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Stephen R. L. Clark [181]Stephen Clark [27]S. R. L. Clark [11]S. Clark [11]
Samuel Clark [11]Stephen Rl Clark [10]Stuart Clark [10]Stacy Clark [4]

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Profile: Stephen R.L. Clark (University of Liverpool, Bristol University)
Profile: Stuart clark
Profile: Sean Clark
Profile: Simon Clark
Profile: Simon Clark
Profile: Steven Joseph Clark (Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education)
Profile: Shawn Clark
Profile: Sarah Clark (Deakin University)
Profile: Sam Clark (Lancaster University)
  1. Patrick Haggard, Sam Clark & Jeri Kalogeras (2002). Voluntary Action and Conscious Awareness. Nature Neuroscience 5 (4):382-385.
  2.  74
    Patrick Haggard & S. Clark (2003). Intentional Action: Conscious Experience and Neural Prediction. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):695-707.
    Intentional action involves both a series of neural events in the motor areas of the brain, and also a distinctive conscious experience that ''I'' am the author of the action. This paper investigates some possible ways in which these neural and phenomenal events may be related. Recent models of motor prediction are relevant to the conscious experience of action as well as to its neural control. Such models depend critically on matching the actual consequences of a movement against its internally (...)
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  3.  41
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1977/1984). The Moral Status of Animals. Oxford University Press.
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  4.  58
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2009). Book Review: Stephen J. Pope, Human Evolution and Christian Ethics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007). Xiii + 359 Pp. £50/US$95 (Hb), ISBN 978-0-521-86340-7. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (4):506-509.
  5. Stephen R. L. Clark (1982/1984). The Nature of the Beast: Are Animals Moral? Oxford University Press.
  6. Stephen R. L. Clark (2003). Constructing Persons: The Psychopathology of Identity. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):157-159.
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  7.  4
    Stephen R. L. Clark & John C. Eccles (1985). The Human Mystery. Philosophical Quarterly 35 (140):323.
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  8.  12
    Stephen Clark & R. Kraut (1993). Aristotle on the Human Good. Journal of Hellenic Studies 113 (3):193.
    Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, which equates the ultimate end of human life with happiness, is thought by many readers to argue that this highest goal consists in the largest possible aggregate of intrinsic goods. Richard Kraut proposes instead that Aristotle identifies happiness with only one type of good: excellent activity of the rational soul. In defense of this reading, Kraut discusses Aristotle's attempt to organize all human goods into a single structure, so that each subordinate end is desirable for the sake (...)
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  9. S. R. L. Clark (2005). Review: Can a Darwinian Be a Christian? The Relationship Between Science and Religion. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (455):773-777.
  10.  96
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). Philosophers and Popular Cosmology. Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (1):115-122.
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  11.  8
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2015). Changing Kinds: Aristotle and the Aristotelians. Diametros 45:19-34.
    Aristotle is routinely blamed for several errors that, it is supposed, held 'science' back for centuries - among others, a belief in distinct, homogenous and unchanging species of living creatures, an essentialist account of human nature, and a suggestion that 'slavery' was a natural institution. This paper briefly examines Aristotle's own arguments and opinions, and the perils posed by a contrary belief in changeable species. Contrary to received opinion even amongst some of his followers, Aristotle was not a species essentialist (...)
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  12.  7
    Samuel Clark (2014). Hume's Uses of Dialogue. Hume Studies 39 (1):61-76.
    What does David Hume do with the dialogue form in Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion? I pursue this question in the context of a partial taxonomy of uses for the dialogue form in philosophy in general—although I want to emphasize the word “partial.” My driving concern here is Hume’s use of dialogue, not to list all possible uses of dialogue or to draw conclusions about the uses of dialogue in philosophy in general. My question sits between two other related questions: a (...)
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  13.  84
    Samuel Clark (2012). Pleasure as Self-Discovery. Ratio 25 (3):260-276.
    This paper uses readings of two classic autobiographies, Edmund Gosse's Father & Son and John Stuart Mill's Autobiography, to develop a distinctive answer to an old and central question in value theory: What role is played by pleasure in the most successful human life? A first section defends my method. The main body of the paper then defines and rejects voluntarist, stoic, and developmental hedonist lessons to be taken from central crises in my two subjects' autobiographies, and argues for a (...)
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  14.  13
    Stuart Clark (2007). Vanities of the Eye: Vision in Early Modern European Culture. Oxford University Press.
    Species : visions and values -- Fantasies : seeing without what was within -- Prestiges : illusions in magic and art -- Glamours : demons and virtual worlds -- Images : the reformation of the eyes -- Apparitions : the discernment of spirits -- Sights : King Saul and King Macbeth -- Seemings : philosophical scepticism -- Dreams : the epistemology of sleep -- Signs : vision and the new philosophy.
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  15. S. R. L. Clark (1991). Book Review : Ethics After Babel, by Jeffrey Stout. Cambridge, James Clarke, 1990. Xiv + 338 Pp. 9.95. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 4 (2):92-93.
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  16. Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). Book Reviews : Environmental Ethics and Process Thinking, by Clare Palmer. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998. 243 Pp. Hb. 35. ISBN 0-19-826952-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 12 (2):89-91.
  17.  8
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1975/1983). Aristotle's Man: Speculations Upon Aristotelian Anthropology. Clarendon Press.
    Words have determinable sense only within a complex of unstated assumptions, and all interpretation must therefore go beyond the given material. This book addresses what is man's place in the Aristotelian world. It also describes man's abilities and prospects in managing his life, and considers how far Aristotle's treatment of time and history licenses the sort of dynamic interpretation of his doctrines that have been given. The ontological model that explains much of Aristotle's conclusions and methods is one of life-worlds, (...)
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  18.  42
    Stephen Clark (2001). The Rules of Division. The Philosophers' Magazine 13 (13):42-43.
    I consider, and rebut, the argument from "twinning" - that zygotes can't be considered human individuals as two or more such individuals could be (sometimes are) produced from one zygote.
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  19. S. E. L. Clark (1996). Book Reviews : The Hungry Soul: Eating and the Perfecting of Our Nature, by Leon R. Kass. New York, Free Press, (London, Simon & Schuster) 1994. Xviii+248 Pp. Hb. 19.95. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 9 (2):100-102.
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  20.  96
    Samuel Clark (2009). No Abiding City: Hume, Naturalism, and Toleration. Philosophy 84 (1):75-94.
    This paper rereads David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion as dramatising a distinctive, naturalistic account of toleration. I have two purposes in mind: first, to complete and ground Hume's fragmentary explicit discussion of toleration; second, to unearth a potentially attractive alternative to more recent, Rawlsian approaches to toleration. To make my case, I connect Dialogues and the problem of toleration to the wider themes of naturalism, scepticism and their relation in Hume's thought, before developing a new interpretation of Dialogues part (...)
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  21.  9
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Animal Rights and Human Morality. Environmental Ethics 5 (2):185-188.
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  22.  21
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2002). Feyerabend's Conquest of Abundance. Inquiry 45 (2):249 – 267.
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  23.  8
    Samuel Clark (2015). Good Work. Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4).
    Work is on one side a central arena of self-making, self-understanding, and self-development, and on the other a deep threat to our flourishing. My question is: what kind of work is good for human beings, and what kind bad? I first characterise work as necessary productive activity. My answer to my question then develops a perfectionist account of the human good: the good is the full development and expression of human potentials and capacities; this development and expression happens over a (...)
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  24. Samuel Clark (2011). Love, Poetry, and the Good Life: Mill's Autobiography and Perfectionist Ethics. Inquiry 53 (6):565-578.
    I argue for a perfectionist reading of Mill’s account of the good life, by using the failures of development recorded in his Autobiography as a way to understand his official account of happiness in Utilitarianism. This work offers both a new perspective on Mill’s thought, and a distinctive account of the role of aesthetic and emotional capacities in the most choiceworthy human life. I consider the philosophical purposes of autobiography, Mill’s disagreements with Bentham, and the nature of competent judges and (...)
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  25.  30
    Stephen R. L. Clark & P. K. Feyerabend (1984). Philosophical PapersVol. I Realism, Rationalism & Scientific MethodVol. II Problems of Empiricism. Philosophical Quarterly 34 (135):172.
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  26.  4
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2015). Atheism Considered as a Christian Sect. Philosophy 90 (2):277-303.
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  27.  4
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1997). Animals and Their Moral Standing. Routledge.
    Twenty years ago, people thought only cranks or sentimentalists could be seriously concerned about the treatment of non-human animals. However, since then philosophers, scientists and welfarists have raised public awareness of the issue; and they have begun to lay the foundations for an enormous change in human practice. This book is a record of the development of 'animal rights' through the eyes of one highly-respected and well-known thinker. This book brings together for the first time Stephen R.L. Clark's major essays (...)
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  28. Stephen Rl Clark (1982). Aristotle Woman. History of Political Thought 3 (2):177-191.
  29.  9
    Stephen Clark (2001). The Rules of Division. The Philosophers' Magazine (13):42-43.
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  30.  6
    Shayne Clark (2006). Miscellaneous Musings on Mūlasarvāstivāda Monks: The Mūlasarvāstivāda Vinaya Revival in Tokugawa Japan. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 33 (1):1-49.
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  31.  51
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and (...)
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  32.  69
    Samuel Clark (2011). Moral Realism as a Moral Doctrine – Matthew H. Kramer. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):425-427.
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  33.  9
    Stuart Clark (2010). The Natural and the Supernatural in the Middle Ages. Common Knowledge 16 (2):290-290.
  34. Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). How to Think About the Earth Philosophical and Theological Models for Ecology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  35.  36
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2008). Deconstructing the Laws of Logic. Philosophy 83 (1):25-53.
    I consider reasons for questioning 'the laws of logic' (identity, non-contradiction, excluded middle, and negation), and suggest that these laws do not accord with everyday reality. Either they are rhetorical tools rather than absolute truths, or else Plato and his successors were right to think that they identify a reality distinct from the ordinary world of experience, and also from the ultimate source of reality.
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  36.  14
    Samuel Clark, Kicking Against the Pricks : Anarchist Perfectionism and the Conditions of Independence.
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  37.  64
    S. R. L. Clark (2005). Book Review: Lying: An Augustinian Theology of Duplicity. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (3):151-153.
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  38. Stephen R. L. Clark (1984). From Athens to Jerusalem: The Love of Wisdom and the Love of God. Oxford University Press.
  39.  60
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). Book Review : Anarchy and Christianity by Jacques Ellul, Translated by G. W. Bromiley. Grand Rapids, Michigan, Eerdmans, 1988. Vi + 110pp. No Price. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 6 (1):52-55.
  40.  2
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1989). Mackie and the Moral Order. Philosophical Quarterly 39 (54):98.
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  41.  50
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1987). How to Believe in Fairies. Inquiry 30 (4):337 – 355.
    To believe in fairies is not to believe in rare Lepidoptera or the like, within a basically materialistic context. It is to take folk?stories seriously as accounts of the ?dreamworld?, the realm of conscious experience of which our ?waking world? is only a province, to acknowledge and make real to ourselves the presence of spirits that enter our consciousness as moods of love or alienation, wild joy or anger. In W. B. Yeats's philosophy fairies are the moods and characters of (...)
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  42. Stephen R. L. Clark & Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Britain) (1998). God, Religion and Reality.
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  43. Stephen Clark & Henry S. Salt (1983). Animals' Rights Considered in Relation to Social Progress. Philosophical Quarterly 33 (130):98.
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  44. Richard E. Ashcroft, D. Chadwick, S. Clark, Richard H. T. Edwards & Lucy Frith (1997). Implications of Socio-Cultural Contexts for the Ethics of Clinical Trials. Core Research.
     
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  45.  30
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). Minds, Memes, and Rhetoric. Inquiry 36 (1-2):3-16.
    Dennett's Consciousness Explained presents, but does not demonstrate, a fully naturalized account of consciousness that manages to leave out the very consciousness he purports to explain. If he were correct, realism and methodological individualism would collapse, as would the very enterprise of giving reasons. The metaphors he deploys actually testify to the power of metaphoric imagination that can no more be identified with the metaphors it creates than minds can be identified with memes. That latter equation, of minds with meme?complexes, (...)
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  46.  7
    Sally Clark (2008). 6 Statistics and the Law. In Andrew Bell, John Swenson-Wright & Karin Tybjerg (eds.), Evidence. Cambridge University Press 19--119.
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  47. Stephen R. L. Clark (2006). Animals and Their Moral Standing. Routledge.
    Twenty years ago, people thought only cranks or sentimentalists could be seriously concerned about the treatment of non-human animals. However, since then philosophers, scientists and welfarists have raised public awareness of the issue; and they have begun to lay the foundations for an enormous change in human practice. This book is a record of the development of 'animal rights' through the eyes of one highly-respected and well-known thinker. This book brings together for the first time Stephen R.L. Clark's major essays (...)
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  48.  9
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2003). Slaves, Servility and Noble Deeds. Philosophical Inquiry 25 (3-4):165-176.
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  49.  4
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1987). The City of the Wise. Apeiron 20 (1):63 - 80.
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  50.  4
    Stephen A. Clark (1993). Revealed Preference and Linear Utility. Theory and Decision 34 (1):21-45.
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