133 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Stephen Davies [105]S. Davies [13]Sarah R. Davies [2]Susanne Davies [2]
Siriol Davies [2]Sarah Davies [1]Stephen J. Davies [1]Steven Davies [1]

Not all matches are shown. Search with initial or firstname to single out others.

See also:
Profile: Sarah Davies
Profile: Sally Josephine Davies
Profile: Sophie Davies (University of Bath)
Profile: Stephanie Davies (University of Wales, Bangor)
  1. Stephen Davies & Peter Goldie, Cross-Cultural Musical Expressiveness: Theory and the Empirical Programme.
    In sections I-VII of this chapter I outline the theoretical background for a research programme considering whether the expressiveness of a culture’s music can be recognised by people from different musical cultures, that is, by people whose music is syntactically and structurally distinct from that of the target culture. In sections VIII-IX, I examine and assess the cross-cultural studies that have been undertaken by psychologists. Most of these studies are compromised by methodological inadequacies.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Stephen Davies, Balinese Legong: Revival or Decline?
    In my understanding of the current status of the legong dance in Bali, despite dedicated local attempts to revitalize the genre, it is in decline. The debilitation of local Balinese arts is influenced by global and national socioeconomic trends, and, while the centralization of dance education in institutes may guarantee the preservation of representative dances and styles, it simultaneously alienates the dance from the grassroots public that formerly was the source of its strength and appreciation. Such changes undermine the standard (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Stephen Davies, I. Is Art Purely Cultural or Does It Centrally Involve a Biological Component?
    Dissanayake is an ethologist. She is interested in human behavioral predispositions that are universal and innate because they have proved to enhance survival, which is defined as reproductive success (1995:36, 2000:21), and, hence, became selected for at the genetic level. Such behaviors must date back at least to the late Pleistocene (20,000 years ago) since it is then that human biological evolution reached its present condition. Subsequent changes involved cultural evolution, a predisposition that is itself based on evolutionary characteristics of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Stephen Davies, The Origins of Balinese Legong.
    The Genre Legong is a secular (balih-balihan) Balinese dance genre (Anon. 1971).[1] Though originally associated with the palace,[2] legong has long been performed in villages, especially at temple ceremonies, as well as at Balinese festivals of the arts. Since the 1920s, abridged versions of legong dances have featured in concerts organized for tourists and in overseas tours by Balinese orchestras. Indeed, the dance has become culturally emblematic, and its image is used to advertise Bali to the world. Traditionally, the dancers (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Stephen Davies, The Role of Westerners in the Conservation of the Legong Dance.
    The image of legong—sumptuously costumed girl dancers crowned with frangipanis—is the face of Balinese culture. Yet it is only one of twenty dance/drama genres and prominent in only some centers. Legong, a secular court dance, has often been (and still is) in danger of extinction. Balinese are now less interested in legong than ever before and musicians prefer to play other kinds of music.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Stephen Davies, Trying to Define Art as the Sum of the Arts.
    defining art conjunctively, that is, by defining the individual arts and joining these definitions in an exhaustive list. I suggest that the individual art forms are no easier to define than is the general category of art. As well, not everything falling within a given art form counts as art, not every instance of art in the given medium falls within the art form, and some artworks do not belong to an art form at all, so conjoining definitions of the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Stephen Davies, What Constitutes Artistic Expression?
    In its narrative, dramatic, and representational genres, art regularly depicts contexts for human emotions and their expressions. It is not surprising, then, that these artforms are often about emotional experiences and displays, and that they are also concerned with the expression of emotion. What is more interesting is that abstract art genres may also include examples that are highly expressive of human emotion. Pure music – that is, stand-alone music played on musical instruments excluding the human voice, and without words, (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Stephen Davies (forthcoming). Functional and Procedural Definitions of Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Stephen Davies (forthcoming). I Have Finished Today Another New Concerto.. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Stephen Davies (forthcoming). Representation in Music. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Stephen Davies (2014). Art and Aesthetic Behaviors as Possible Expressions of Our Biologically Evolved Human Nature. Philosophy Compass 9 (6):361-367.
    In this paper, I review arguments that have been offered in favor of the view that humans' art and/or aesthetic behaviors are (in part) a product of our biologically evolved human nature, either as adaptations in their own right or as incidental byproducts of adaptations with non-art and non-aesthetic functions. I present an overview of the main positions and options, critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, and outline their presuppositions.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Stephen Davies (2014). Lopes, Dominic Mciver. Beyond Art. Oxford University Press, 2014, Iii + 249 Pp., $35.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (3):329-332.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Matthew Kearnes, Phil Macnaghten & Sarah R. Davies (2014). Narrative, Nanotechnology and the Accomplishment of Public Responses: A Response to Thorstensen. NanoEthics 8 (3):241-250.
    In this paper, we respond to a critique by Erik Thorstensen of the ‘Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies’ project concerning its ‘realist’ treatment of narrative, its restricted analytical framework and resources, its apparent confusion in focus and its unjustified contextualisation and overextension of its findings. We show that these criticisms are based on fairly serious misunderstandings of the DEEPEN project, its interdisciplinary approachand its conceptual context. Having responded to Thorstensen’s criticisms, we take the opportunity to clarify and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. S. Davies (2013). Performing Musical Works Authentically: A Response to Dodd. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):71-75.
    A kind of musical authenticity Julian Dodd thinks has been neglected, interpretive authenticity, as he calls it, is intended to provide both an insightful and faithful understanding of the work. This kind of authenticity is distinguished from score compliance authenticity (a view I have defended) on grounds that an authentic musical interpretation can sometimes deliberately depart from the score. I argue that none of the four examples Dodd offers in favour of this hypothesis is uncontroversial. I have less faith than (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. S. Davies (2013). The Mess Inside: Narrative, Emotion, and the Mind. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (2):247-249.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. S. F. Davies (2013). The Reception of Reginald Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft: Witchcraft, Magic, and Radical Religion. Journal of the History of Ideas 74 (3):381-401.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Stephen Davies (2013). Artists' Intentions and Artwork Meanings: Some Complications. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):138 - 139.
    Artists' intentions are among the primary data retrieved by art appreciators. However, artistic creation is not always deliberate; artists sometimes fail in their intentions; artists' achievements depend on artworld roles, not only intentions; factors external to the artist contribute to artwork meaning; artworks stand apart from their creators; and interpretation need not be exclusively concerned with recovering intended meaning.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Stephen Davies (2013). Music-to-Listener Emotional Contagion. In Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control. Oup Oxford. 169.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Stephen Davies (2013). The Evolutionary Value of an Aesthetic Sense. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (2):75-79.
    The aesthetic sense we inherited from our successful ancestors drew them toward conditions that made for survival and reproductive success and repelled them away from conditions that impacted negatively on longevity and fertility. But for them, as for us, those desirable outcomes were incidental and uncalculated. Their search was for the beautiful and sublime. Aesthetic behaviours are apparent in our forerunner species about 400,000 years ago. They sometimes made symmetrical hand axes that were then not used. We can take an (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Sarah R. Davies & Arianna Ferrari (2012). Introduction: S.NET and Nanoethics. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 6 (3):211-213.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Stephen Davies (2012). Authentic Performances on Musical Works. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 31 (3):81-88.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Stephen Davies (2012). On Defining Music. The Monist 95 (4):535-555.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Stephen Davies (2012). The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution. Oup Oxford.
    Stephen Davies presents a fascinating exploration of the idea that art, and our aesthetic sensibilities more generally, should be understood as an element in human evolution. He asks: Do animals have aesthetics? Do our aesthetic preferences have prehistoric roots? Is art universal? What is the biological role of aesthetic and artistic behaviour?
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Stephen Davies (2011). Emotions Expressed and Aroused by Music: Philosophical Perspectives. In Patrik N. Juslin & John Sloboda (eds.), Handbook of Music and Emotion: Theory, Research, Applications. Oup Oxford.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Stephen Davies (2011). Expressiveness: Theory and the Empirical Programme. In Elisabeth Schellekens & Peter Goldie (eds.), The Aesthetic Mind: Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. 376.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Stephen Davies (2011). Infectious Music: Music-Listener Emotional Contagion. In Amy Coplan & Peter Goldie (eds.), Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Stephen Davies (2011). Musical Understandings. New York;Oxford University Press.
    In this chapter, I discuss the kinds of understanding expected of and evinced by skilled listeners, performers, analysts, and composers. I confine the discussion to Western, purely instrumental music, mainly with the classical tradition in mind.[1] And I refer primarily to the Anglophone literature of "analytic" philosophy of music. As will become apparent, my concern is with an analysis that maps what are meant to be familiar aspects of musical experience. I investigate the various understandings expected of an accomplished listener, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. S. Davies (2010). Why Art Is Not a Spandrel. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (4):333-341.
    If one views humans’ creation and appreciation of art as grounded in our biological nature, it might be tempting to see art as a spandrel, as an adventitious by-product of some adaptation without adaptive significance in itself. Such a position connects art to our evolved human nature yet apparently avoids the demands of demonstrating how art behaviours enhanced the fitness of our ancestors in the Upper Paleolithic. In this paper I explore two arguments that count against the view that art (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Sarah Davies & Phil Macnaghten (2010). Narratives of Mastery and Resistance: Lay Ethics of Nanotechnology. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 4 (2):141-151.
    This paper contributes towards a lay ethics of nanotechnology through an analysis of talk from focus groups designed to examine how laypeople grapple with the meaning of a technology ‘in-the-making’. We describe the content of lay ethical concerns before suggesting that this content can be understood as being structured by five archetypal narratives which underpin talk. These we term: ‘the rich get richer and the poor get poorer’; ‘kept in the dark’; ‘opening Pandora’s box’; ‘messing with nature’; and ‘be careful (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Stephen Davies (2010). Functional Beauty Examined. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):315-332.
    In Functional Beauty, Glenn Parsons and Allen Carlson defend the importance of Functional Beauty—that is, the view that an item's fitness (or otherwise) for its proper function is a source of positive (or negative) aesthetic value—within a unified comprehensive aesthetic theory that encompasses art, the everyday, animals and organic nature, natural environments and inorganic nature, and artifacts. In the following section, I outline the main lines of argument presented in the book. I then criticize some of these arguments. I do (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Stephen Davies (2010). Perceiving Melodies and Perceiving Musical Colors. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):19-39.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Stephen Davies (2010). The Hypothetical Intentionalist's Dilemma: A Reply to Levinson. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (3):307-312.
    In a recent essay, Jerrold Levinson defends his version of hypothetical intentionalism (HI), which is a theory of literary interpretation, from two criticisms. The first, argued by Stephen Davies, is that it is equivalent to the value-maximizing view. The second, argued by Robert Stecker, is that there are straightforward counterexamples to HI. We will argue that Levinson does not successfully fend off either criticism, and further, that in the process of attempting to do so, creates another dilemma for his view. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Surekha Davies (2010). An Intellectual History of Cannibalism. Intellectual History Review 20 (2):275-277.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. R. Stecker & S. Davies (2010). The Hypothetical Intentionalist's Dilemma: A Reply to Levinson. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (3):307-312.
    In a recent essay, Jerrold Levinson defends his version of hypothetical intentionalism (HI), which is a theory of literary interpretation, from two criticisms. The first, argued by Stephen Davies, is that it is equivalent to the value-maximizing view. The second, argued by Robert Stecker, is that there are straightforward counterexamples to HI. We will argue that Levinson does not successfully fend off either criticism, and further, that in the process of attempting to do so, creates another dilemma for his view.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Stephen Davies (2009). Aesthetics and Music • by Andy Hamilton. Analysis 69 (2):397-398.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Stephen Davies (ed.) (2009). A Companion to Aesthetics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Written by prominent scholars covering a wide-range of key topics in aesthetics and the philosophy of art Features revised and expanded entries from the first ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Stephen Davies (2009). Life is a Passacaglia. Philosophy and Literature 33 (2):315-328.
    Arthur C. Danto taught that an artwork’s identity and content depend on "an atmosphere of theory the eye cannot de[s]cry" (1964:580). By "theory", he did not mean the ideas developed by philosophers of art. His point was that an artwork can be properly recognized and appreciated only when seen in relation to the heritage of works, writings, practices, genres, and conventions that form the ground on which it stands out as subject. In brief, the work must be seen against the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Stephen Davies (2009). Responding Emotionally to Fictions. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (3):269 - 284.
    It is widely held that there is a paradox in the fact that we respond emotionally to characters, situations, or events that we know to be fictional, or in other words, when they do not exist. To take a familiar example.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Stephen Davies (2009). Review of Malcolm Budd, Aesthetic Essays. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (8).
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Stephen Davies (2008). Cosi's Canon Quartet. In Garry Hagberg (ed.), Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell Pub.. 243--258.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Stephen Davies (2008). Introduction to a Philosophy of Music. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):222–224.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Stephen Davies (2008). Musical Works and Orchestral Colour. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (4):363-375.
    known as timbral sonicism, accepts that a musical work's orchestral colour is a factor in its identity, but denies that the use of the specified instruments is required for an authentic rendition of the work provided that sounds as of those instruments are achieved. This position has been defended by Julian Dodd. In arguing against his view, I appeal to empirical work showing that composers, musicians, and listeners typically hear through music to the actions that go into its production. In (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Susanne Davies (2008). Review: Shaughnessy Bishop-Stall, Down to This: A Year Living with the Homeless (University of Queensland Press, St Lucia, 2007). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 92 (1):137-141.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. S. Davies (2007). Gail Hawkes, Sex and Pleasure in Western Culture. Thesis Eleven 88:136.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. S. Davies (2007). The Psychology of Art and the Evolution of the Conscious Brain. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):97-99.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Stephen Davies (2007). And Literary Translations. In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press. 79.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Stephen Davies (2007). Balinese Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (1):21–29.
    According to the Balinese expert, Dr. Anak Agung Mad ´e Djelantik, “no writings about aesthetics specifically as a discipline exist in Bali.”1 The arts are discussed in ancient palm leaf texts, but mainly in connection with religion, spirituality, ceremony, and the like. However, there are famous accounts by expatriate Westerners and anthropologists.2 There have also been collaborations between Balinese and Western scholars.3 In addition, there is a significant literature written in Indonesian by Balinese experts, beginning in the 1970s.4 Considerable experience (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Stephen Davies (2007). La vita a ritmo di Passacaglia. Rivista di Estetica 47 (35):129-146.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Stephen Davies (2007). Musical Ontology. Sounds, Instruments and Works of Music / Julian Dodd ; Doing Justice to Musical Works / Michael Morris ; Versions of Musical Works and Literary Translations. In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.
  50. Stephen Davies (2007/2010). Philosophical Perspectives on Art. New York;Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical Perspectives on Art presents a series of essays devoted to two of the most fundamental topics in the philosophy of art: the distinctive character of artworks and what is involved in understanding them as art. In Part I, Stephen Davies considers a wide range of questions about the nature and definition of art. Can art be defined, and if so, which definitions are the most plausible? Do we make and consume art because there are evolutionary advantages to doing so? (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 133