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S. Dexter [3]Scott Dexter [3]
  1. Samir Chopra & Scott Dexter, Decoding Liberation: The Promise of Free and Open Source Software.
    Routledge (New Media and Cyberculture Series), July 2007.
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  2. Scott Dexter & Aaron Kozbelt (2013). Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) as a Model Domain for Answering Big Questions About Creativity. Mind and Society 12 (1):113-123.
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  3. S. Chopra & S. Dexter (2011). Free Software and the Economics of Information Justice. Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):173-184.
    Claims about the potential of free software to reform the production and distribution of software are routinely countered by skepticism that the free software community fails to engage the pragmatic and economic ‘realities’ of a software industry. We argue to the contrary that contemporary business and economic trends definitively demonstrate the financial viability of an economy based on free software. But the argument for free software derives its true normative weight from social justice considerations: the evaluation of the basis for (...)
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  4. S. Chopra & S. Dexter (2009). Free Software, Economic 'Realities', and Information Justice. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 39 (3):12-26.
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  5. Samir Chopra & Scott Dexter (2009). The Freedoms of Software and its Ethical Uses. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (4):287-297.
    The “free” in “free software” refers to a cluster of four specific freedoms identified by the Free Software Definition. The first freedom, termed “Freedom Zero,” intends to protect the right of the user to deploy software in whatever fashion, towards whatever end, he or she sees fit. But software may be used to achieve ethically questionable ends. This highlights a tension in the provision of software freedoms: while the definition explicitly forbids direct restrictions on users’ freedoms, it does not address (...)
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  6. S. Chopra & S. Dexter (2007). Free Software and the Political Philosophy of the Cyborg World. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 37 (2):41-52.
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