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  1. S. Douglas Olson (forthcoming). The Staging of Aristophanes, Ec. 504-727. American Journal of Philology.
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  2. S. Douglas Olson (2013). A. De Cremoux La Cité parodique. Études sur les Acharniens d'Aristophane. (Supplementi di Lexis 36.) Pp. iv + 423. Amsterdam: Adolf M. Hakkert, 2011. Paper, €96. ISBN: 978-90-256-1262-7. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (2):620-621.
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  3. S. Douglas Olson (2013). The Birth of Comedy: Texts, Documents, and Art From Athenian Comic Competitions, 486-280 Ed. By Jeffrey Rusten (Review). Classical World 106 (3):538-539.
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  4. S. Douglas Olson (2011). (S.) Reece Homer's Winged Words: The Evolution of Early Greek Epic Diction in the Light of Oral Theory (Mnemosyne Supplements 313). Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2009. Pp. Xi + 413, Illus. €163/$241. 9789004174412. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 131:279-.
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  5. S. Douglas Olson (2010). Aristophanes (N.G.) Wilson Aristophanea. Studies on the Text of Aristophanes. Pp. X + 218. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £50. ISBN: 978-0-19-928299-9. (N.G.) Wilson (Ed.) Aristophanis Fabulae. Tomus I. Acharnenses, Equites, Nubes, Vespae, Pax, Aves. (Scriptorum Classicorum Bibliotheca Oxoniensis.) Pp. X + 427. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £19.50. ISBN: 978-0-19-872180-2. (N.G.) Wilson (Ed.) Aristophanis Fabulae. Tomus II. Lysistrata, Thesmophoriazusae, Ranae, Ecclesiazusae, Plutus. (Scriptorum Classicorum Bibliotheca Oxoniensis.) Pp. Iv + 326. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £19.50. ISBN: 978-0-19-872181-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (02):354-357.
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  6. S. Douglas Olson (2010). (R.) Bertolín Cebrián Comic Epic and Parodies of Epic. Literature for Youth and Children in Ancient Greece. (Spudasmata 122.) Pp. Vi + 133. Hildesheim, Zurich and New York: Georg Olms, 2008. Paper, €29.80. ISBN: 978-3-487-13879-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (01):304-.
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  7. S. Douglas Olson (2010). The Comic Poet Pherecrates, a War-Casualty of the Late 410s BC. Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:49-50.
    The comic poet Pherecrates does not appear to have been active after the mid 410s. I suggest that he is to be identified with an epigraphically-attested war-casualty from a few years later.
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  8. S. Douglas Olson (2008). Humour, Obscenity, and Aristophanes (Review). Classical World 101 (2):260-261.
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  9. S. Douglas Olson (2008). (R.F.) Regtuit Scholia in Thesmophoriazusas; Ranas; Ecclesiazusas Et Plutum. (Scholia in Aristophanem, Pars 3, Fasciculus 2/3.) Pp. Vi + 131, Ills. Groningen: Egbert Forsten, 2007. Cased, €110. ISBN: 978-90-6980-173-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (02):619-.
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  10. S. Douglas Olson (2006). Greek Historical Inscriptions 404-323 B.C. (Review). Classical World 99 (4):463-464.
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  11. S. Douglas Olson (2004). Ab Ovo Usque Ad Mala A. Dalby: Food in the Ancient World From a to Z . Pp. XVI + 408, Maps, Ills. London and New York: Routledge, 2003. Cased. Isbn:0-415-23259-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):529-.
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  12. S. Douglas Olson (1999). Kleon's Eyebrows (Cratin. Fr. 228 K-A) and Late 5th-Century Comic Portrait-Masks. Classical Quarterly 49 (01):320-321.
    At Aristophanes, Equites 230–2, one of the slaves who speak the prologue informs the audience that, when the Paphlagonian appears onstage, his mask will not resemble him, for the σκεoπoιoí were afraid to make one that depicted him accurately. In an important article, K. J. Dover argued that it must in fact have been very difficult to create easily recognizable portrait-masks, and suggested that the joke in Eq. 230–2 may be that the Paphlagonian's mask is horribly ugly but allegedly still (...)
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  13. S. Douglas Olson & D. Kidd (1999). Aratus, Phaenomena. Journal of Hellenic Studies 119:187.
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  14. S. Douglas Olson (1998). Studies in the Later Manuscript Tradition of Aristophanes' Peace. Classical Quarterly 48 (01):62-.
    Aristophanes' Peace is preserved in ten manuscripts, the oldest and most complete of which are the tenth-century Ravennas 429 and the eleventh-century Venetus Marcianus 474 . A third manuscript, Venetus Marcianus 475 , is almost certainly a direct copy of V and can therefore be eliminated. The seven remaining manuscripts of the play, along with the Aldine edition of 1498, share numerous variant readings, as well as lacunae at 948–1011 and 1076b, and can accordingly be described as a family. As (...)
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  15. S. Douglas Olson & Ineke Sluiter (1996). An Emendation in Porphyry's Commentary on Ptolemy's Harmonics. Classical Quarterly 46 (02):596-.
    So far am I from rejecting the use of what has been well stated by others, that I would wish that everyone said the same things about the same things and, as Socrates puts it, in the same words, and then there would be no undisputed quarrelling among men about the matters at hand.
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  16. S. Douglas Olson (1992). Names and Naming in Aristophanic Comedy. Classical Quarterly 42 (02):304-.
    One of the ironies of literary history is that the survival of Aristophanic comedy and indeed of all Greek drama is due to the more or less faithful transmission of a written text. Reading a play and watching one, after all, are very different sorts of activities. Unlike a book, in which the reader can leaf backward for reminders of what has already happened or forward for information about what is to come, a play onstage can be experienced in one (...)
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  17. S. Douglas Olson (1991). Anonymous Male Parts in Aristophanes' Ecclesiazusae and the Identity of the Δεσπóτης. Classical Quarterly 41 (01):36-.
    The staging of Aristophanes' Ecclesiazusae is complicated considerably by the large number of individual male citizen parts in the play. These include Praxagora's husband Blepyrus , Blepyrus' anonymous Neighbour and his friend Chremes , the First Citizen and the Second Citizen , the Young Man ‘Epigenes’ , and the δεσπτης who leads out the Chorus . These are not necesarily all independent characters, but the great difficulty with the play is in deciding precisely who is to be identified with whom. (...)
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  18. S. Douglas Olson (1991). Dicaepolis' Motivation in Aristophanes' "Acharnians". Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:200-203.
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  19. S. Douglas Olson (1988). Dionysus and the Pirates in Euripides' 'Cyclops'. Hermes 116 (4):502-504.
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  20. S. Douglas Olson (1988). The 'Love Duet' In Aristophanes' Ecclesiazusae. Classical Quarterly 38 (02):328-.
    Over sixty years ago, Walter Headlam identified Ecclesiazusae 960–76 as a paraclausithyron, or song sung by an excluded lover from the street to his beloved within. In 1958, however, C. M. Bowra suggested that the whole of Eccl. 952–75 was actually the sole surviving example of a previously unrecognized genre of Greek lyric poetry, the informal love duet. The thesis has been widely accepted, and is adopted by Rossi, Henderson and Silk, as well as by the Oxford editor, Ussher, who (...)
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