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Stale Fredriksen [3]S. Fredriksen [3]
  1. S. Fredriksen (2006). Tragedy, Utopia and Medical Progress. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):450-453.
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  2. Stale Fredriksen (2005). Luck, Risk, and Blame. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (5):535 – 553.
    In this article, I defend luck at the expense of risk. Or, more precisely, I try to make a distinction that gives both concepts fair treatment. I start by making it clear that luck stands in opposition to control and not to causation. Both luck and risk are related to causal uncertainty. But it is warranted to talk about risk only when the uncertainty involved is brought under control, as it is in some familiar forms of fair (...)
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  3. Ståle Fredriksen (2005). Limits to Doubt. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (5):379-395.
    Supported by Ian Hacking’s concept of “intervention,” and Charles Taylor’s concept of “intentionality,” this article argues that doubting is acting, and that doubting is therefore subject to the same demands of responsibility as any other action. The argument is developed by using medical practice as a test-case. The central suggestion is that the demand of acting responsibly limits doubt in medicine. The article focuses on two such limitations to doubt. Firstly, the article argues that it is irresponsible to doubt that (...)
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  4. Ståle Fredriksen (2003). Instrumental Colonisation in Modern Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):287-296.
    Stethoscopes, x-rays and other medical technologies are two-edged swords. They make medical treatment and diagnosis more accurate and effective, but do at the same time reveal our perceptual inadequacy. By transcending our senses, these technologies reveal that we can be seriously diseased without experiencing any symptoms at all. This situation has changed our attitude towards our relations and ourselves. The situation can be analysed using Jürgen Habermas’ conception of systems colonisation of the lifeworld. Medical technologies colonise our life world. They (...)
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  5. S. Fredriksen (2002). Diseases Are Invisible. Medical Humanities 28 (2):71-73.
    The success of modern medicine is closely related to its ability to transcend the human senses. Technological advances such as stethoscopes, microscopes, and x rays overstep the boundaries of human perception. They enable us to see what is invisible to the unaided senses. These technologies have brought about fundamental changes to medicine—for the most part for the better. But they have also caught us in a tragic trap. They have left us in an odd position where we can no longer (...)
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  6. T. Arnesen & S. Fredriksen (1995). Coping with Obligations Towards Patient and Society: An Empirical Study of Attitudes and Practice Among Norwegian Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (3):158-161.
    A questionnaire relating to attitudes towards setting economic priorities within the health care system was sent to all 151 general practitioners in Northern Norway. Of these, 109 (72 per cent) responded. Ninety-six per cent of the respondents agreed or partly agreed that the setting of economic priorities within the health care system was necessary. Ninety-three per cent had experienced a conflict between their responsibility towards the individual patient and the requirement for them to manage the health budget. The responses suggest (...)
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