Search results for 'S. Hausman' (try it on Scholar)

83 found
Sort by:
  1. Carl R. Hausman (1993). Charles S. Peirce's Evolutionary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 600.0
    In this systematic introduction to the philosophy of Charles S. Peirce, the author focuses on four of Peirce's fundamental conceptions: pragmatism and Peirce's development of it into what he called 'pragmaticism'; his theory of signs; his phenomenology; and his theory that continuity is of prime importance for philosophy. He argues that at the centre of Peirce's philosophical project is a unique form of metaphysical realism, whereby continuity and evolutionary change are both necessary for our understanding of experience. In his final (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. D. M. Hausman (2011). Is an Overdose of Paracetamol Bad for One's Health? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (3):657-668.score: 420.0
    1 Overview of the problem2 Situationally Specific Normal Functioning and Capacities3 Kingma’s Criticism4 How Normal Responses can be Pathological5 Too Many Pathologies?6 Conclusions.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Daniel M. Hausman (1981). John Stuart Mill's Philosophy of Economics. Philosophy of Science 48 (3):363-385.score: 420.0
    John Stuart Mill regards economics as an inexact and separate science which employs a deductive method. This paper analyzes and restates Mill's views and considers whether they help one to understand philosophical peculiarities of contemporary microeconomic theory. The author concludes that it is philosophically enlightening to interpret microeconomics as an inexact and separate science, but that Mill's notion of a deductive method has only a little to contribute.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Carl R. Hausman (2002). Charles Peirce's Evolutionary Realism as a Process Philosophy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 38 (1/2):13 - 27.score: 420.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Carl R. Hausman (1988). Fourthness: Carl Vaught on Peirce's Categories. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 24 (2):265 - 278.score: 420.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Carl Hausman (1998). Infinitesimals as Origins of Evolution: Comments Prompted by Timothy Herron and Hilary Putnam on Peirce's Synechism and Infinitesimals. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 34 (3):627 - 640.score: 420.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Bernice L. Hausman (1999). Between Science and Nature: Interpreting Lactation Failure in Elizabeth von Arnim's The Pastor's Wife. Journal of Medical Humanities 20 (2):101-115.score: 420.0
    Interpreting a scene of lactation failure allows us to represent breast-feeding as a contested social practice. This essay reads a novelistic scene of lactation failure in the context of the decline of breast-feeding in the twentieth century. The protagonist's ignorance of the female experiences of pregnancy, childbirth, and lactation is an effect of her objectification within the opposition between science and nature. Unnatural as a woman because she is a natural individual, the pastor's wife exemplifies the dilemmas of breast-feeding as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Carl R. Hausman (1990). In and Out of Peirce's Percepts. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 26 (3):271 - 308.score: 420.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Carl Hausman & Douglas R. Anderson (1994). The Telos of Peirce's Realism: Some Comments on Margolis's "The Passing of Peirce's Realism". Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 30 (4):825 - 838.score: 420.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Carl R. Hausman (1987). Metaphorical Reference and Peirce's Dynamical Object. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 23 (3):381 - 409.score: 420.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Carl R. Hausman (1991). Peirce's Evolutionary Realism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 27 (4):475 - 500.score: 420.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Carl R. Hausman (2008). Charles Peirce's Categories and the Growth of Reason. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (3):209-222.score: 420.0
    Charles Peirce’s semeiotic is inseparable from his account of the three categories of experience and his metaphysics. The discussion summarizes his account of the categories and considers the way they have ontological implications. These implications are then focused on Peirce’s Apapism, which is his way of referring to a theory of evolution. Finally, some suggestions are offered for a way the semeiotic with the metaphysical implications, especially their relevance for a theory of evolution, propose how Peirce might apply them for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Alan Hausman & David Hausman (1995). A New Approach to Berkeley's Ideal Reality. In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 420.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Alan Hausman & David Hausman (1995). On Allaire's "Yet Another Visit&Quot;. In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 420.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Douglas R. Anderson & Carl R. Hausman (1992). The Role of Aesthetic Emotion in R. G. Collingwood's Conception of Creative Activity. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (4):299-305.score: 360.0
  16. Daniel M. Hausman (2007). What's Wrong with Health Inequalities? Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (1):46–66.score: 360.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Carl R. Hausman (1960). Maritain's Interpretation of Creativity in Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (2):215-219.score: 360.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Alan Hausman (1967). Hume's Theory of Relations. Noûs 1 (3):255-282.score: 360.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Carl R. Hausman (1998). Aaron Ridley's Defense of Collingwood Pursued. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (4):391-393.score: 360.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Alan Hausman & David Hausman (1996). Berkeley's Semantic Dilemma: Beyond the Inherence Model. History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (2):221 - 238.score: 360.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. D. Hausman (2008). Price Huw, Corry Richard (Eds.), Causation, Physics, and the Constitution of Reality: Russell's Republic Revisited. Oxford University Press (2007), Pp. 403+Ix, $35, 978-0-19-927819-. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (1):231-233.score: 360.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Alan Hausman (1984). Adhering to Inherence: A New Look at the Old Steps in Berkeley's March to Idealism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 14 (3):421 - 443.score: 360.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Alan Hausman (1979). Goodman's Perfect Communities. Synthese 41 (2):185 - 237.score: 360.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. David B. Hausman (1988). Can Hume's Use of a Simple/Complex Distinction Be Made Consistent? Hume Studies 14 (2):424-428.score: 360.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. R. E. Hausman (1981). Behavior of Cells Cell Adhesion and Motility A. S. G. Curtis J. D. Pitts. BioScience 31 (10):771-771.score: 360.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Alan Hausman & David Hausman (1992). Descartes's Secular Semantics. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):81 - 104.score: 360.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. David Hausman (1989). Hume's Use of Illicit Substances. Hume Studies 15 (1):1-38.score: 360.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Daniel M. Hausman (2009). Review of C. L. Ten (Ed.), Mill's on Liberty: A Critical Guide. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).score: 360.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Carl R. Hausman (1996). Charles Peirce's Pragmatic Pluralism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):472-473.score: 360.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Alan Hausman (1968). Solipsism and Berkeley's Alleged Realism. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 22:403-412.score: 360.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. David B. Hausman (1978). Should Hume's Psychology Be Endured? Southern Journal of Philosophy 16 (3):183-192.score: 360.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Heidi Y. Lawrence, Bernice L. Hausman & Clare J. Dannenberg (forthcoming). Reframing Medicine's Publics: The Local as a Public of Vaccine Refusal. Journal of Medical Humanities.score: 360.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (2009). Preference Satisfaction and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):1-25.score: 300.0
    The tenuous claims of cost-benefit analysis to guide policy so as to promote welfare turn on measuring welfare by preference satisfaction and taking willingness-to-pay to indicate preferences. Yet it is obvious that people's preferences are not always self-interested and that false beliefs may lead people to prefer what is worse for them even when people are self-interested. So welfare is not preference satisfaction, and hence it appears that cost-benefit analysis and welfare economics in general rely on a mistaken theory of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Daniel M. Hausman (2012). Well-Being and Fair Distribution: Beyond Cost-Benefit Analysis, Adler. Oxford University Press, 2012, 634 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):435-443.score: 300.0
    Book Reviews Daniel M. Hausman, Economics and Philosophy , FirstView Article(s) .
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Robert S. Corrington, Carl Hausman & Thomas M. Seebohm (eds.) (1987). Pragmatism Considers Phenomenology. University Press of America.score: 300.0
    A collection of papers from a conference held in 1984.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. James S. Kelly & Alan Hausman (1986). Identifying Identity. Erkenntnis 25 (3):319 - 322.score: 300.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. D. Pimentel, N. Brown, F. Vecchio, V. La Capra, S. Hausman, O. Lee, A. Diaz, J. Williams, S. Cooper & E. Newburger (1992). Ethical Issues Concerning Potential Global Climate Change on Food Production. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 5 (2):113-146.score: 240.0
    Burning fossil fuel in the North American continent contributes more to the CO2 global warming problem than in any other continent. The resulting climate changes are expected to alter food production. The overall changes in temperature, moisture, carbon dioxide, insect pests, plant pathogens, and weeds associated with global warming are projected to reduce food production in North America. However, in Africa, the projected slight rise in rainfall is encouraging, especially since Africa already suffers from severe shortages of rainfall. For all (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (1988). Standards. Economics and Philosophy 4 (01):1-.score: 240.0
  39. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (1998). [Book Review] Economic Analysis and Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics 109 (1):198-200.score: 240.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Daniel M. Hausman, Michael S. McPherson, James Luther Adams, Wilhelm Pauck, Roger-Lincoln Shinn, Julia Annas, Jonathan Barnes, Richard J. Bernstein, Paul Canick & Ronald Christenson (1986). Received by 1 November 1985. Teaching Philosophy 9 (1).score: 240.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Cheshire Calhoun, Mark LeBar, Matthew S. Bedke, Seth Lazar, Neil Levy & Daniel M. Hausman (2009). 10. Iakovos Vasiliou, Aiming at Virtue in Plato Iakovos Vasiliou, Aiming at Virtue in Plato (Pp. 796-800). In John Hawthorne (ed.), Ethics. Wiley Periodicals, Inc..score: 240.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Carl R. Hausman (2007). Metaphorical Semeiotic Referents: Dyadic Objects. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (2):276-287.score: 180.0
    : When language is expressed metaphorically, metaphors seem to "say" something that has never seen said before. Some of them seem to express insights. What then are the constraints on their interpretations? Charles Peirce's semeiotic suggests a way to answer the question. Crucial to the answer is Peirce's account of semeiotic objects as two-fold, one side, the dynamic or "real" object to be interpreted, the other side, the immediate object, which is the dynamic object that has been interpreted. The interaction (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. H. G. Callaway (1996). Review: Carl R. Hausman, Charles S. Peirce's Evolutionary Philosophy. [REVIEW] Dialectica 50 (No. 2):153-161.score: 156.0
    Carl Hausman is a former editor of The Journal of Speculative Philosophy, a revival of one of the first American philosophy journals, where Peirce published some of his early work; and Hausman has devoted a good deal of his career to Peirce scholarship. He interprets Peirce’s thought “as a fallibilistic foundationalism that affirms a unique realism according to which what is real is a dynamic, evolving extramental condition.” The theme is an interesting one partly in view of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Geert Reuten (1997). What About Falsifiability? Further Notes on Hausman's Revision of the Neoclassical Economic Methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology 4 (2):297-302.score: 144.0
    Even if falsificationism in the strict Popper-Lakatos sense may be too harsh for economics, falsifiability and refutability are eminent criteria for theory appraisal. Hausman's (1997) revision of his (1992) methodology of economics does not come sufficiently close to meeting such a methodological requirement and risks allowing the prioritising of irrefutable theories over empirical phenomena. It therefore needs further advancement.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Neil De Marchi (1986). Mill's Unrevised Philosophy of Economics: A Comment on Hausman. Philosophy of Science 53 (1):89 - 100.score: 126.0
    Hausman has argued that Mill in the Logic demands verification of qualified, inexact statements if they are to be considered lawlike. This puts Mill in line with a reasonable interpretation of what modern microeconomists are about, but requires the additional hypothesis that Mill abandoned his earlier stress on modal truth in his 1836 essay on the method of economics. The paper maintains that neither textual nor contextual evidence supports this hypothesis. Moreover, it is superfluous if one attends carefully (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Daniel M. Hausman & Matt Sensat Waldren (2012). Egalitarianism Reconsidered. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):567-586.score: 120.0
    This paper argues that egalitarian theories should be judged by the degree to which they meet four different challenges. Fundamentalist egalitarianism, which contends that certain inequalities are intrinsically bad or unjust regardless of their consequences, fails to meet these challenges. Building on discussions by T.M. Scanlon and David Miller, we argue that egalitarianism is better understood in terms of commitments to six egalitarian objectives. A consequence of our view, in contrast to Martin O'Neill's “non-intrinsic egalitarianism,“ is that egalitarianism is better (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Daniel M. Hausman (2010). Hedonism and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 26 (03):321-344.score: 120.0
    This essay criticizes the proposal recently defended by a number of prominent economists that welfare economics be redirected away from the satisfaction of people's preferences and toward making people happy instead. Although information about happiness may sometimes be of use, the notion of happiness is sufficiently ambiguous and the objections to identifying welfare with happiness are sufficiently serious that welfare economists are better off using preference satisfaction as a measure of welfare. The essay also examines and criticizes the position associated (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Daniel M. Hausman (2005). Sympathy, Commitment, and Preference. Economics and Philosophy 21 (1):33-50.score: 120.0
    While very much in Sen's camp in rejecting revealed preference theory and emphasizing the complexity, incompleteness, and context dependence of preference and the intellectual costs of supposing that all the factors influencing choice can be captured by a single notion of preference, this essay contests his view that economists should recognize multiple notions of preference. It argues that Sen's concerns are better served by embracing a single conception of preference and insisting on the need for analysis of the multiple factors (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Daniel M. Hausman & James Woodward (2004). Modularity and the Causal Markov Condition: A Restatement. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (1):147-161.score: 120.0
    expose some gaps and difficulties in the argument for the causal Markov condition in our essay ‘Independence, Invariance and the Causal Markov Condition’ ([1999]), and we are grateful for the opportunity to reformulate our position. In particular, Cartwright disagrees vigorously with many of the theses we advance about the connection between causation and manipulation. Although we are not persuaded by some of her criticisms, we shall confine ourselves to showing how our central argument can be reconstructed and to casting doubt (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Daniel M. Hausman, Economics, Philosophy Of.score: 120.0
    People have thought about economics for as long as they have thought about how to manage their households, and indeed Aristotle assimilated the study of the economic affairs of a city to the study of the management of a household. During the two millennia between Aristotle and Adam Smith, one finds reflections concerning economic problems mainly in the context of discussions of moral or policy questions. For example, scholastic philosophers commented on money and interest in inquiries concerning the justice of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 83