Search results for 'S. J. Helling' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Philip Patterson, Monte Myrick, S. J. Helling, Don Ridgway & George Tanner (1987). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 2 (2):102 – 108.score: 870.0
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  2. Louis Brunet (1987). SCHALL, James V., S.J., The Politics of Heaven and Hell. Christian Themes From Classical, Medieval and Modern Political Philosophy SCHALL, James V., S.J., The Politics of Heaven and Hell. Christian Themes From Classical, Medieval and Modern Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Laval Théologique et Philosophique 43 (3):428-429.score: 145.0
  3. Brian R. Clack (1995). Frank G. Kirkpatrick. Together Bound: God, History, and the Religious Community. Pp. Xviii+195. (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994).£27.50.Jonathan L. Kvanvig. The Problem of Hell. Pp. Viii+182. (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993). £22.50.Anders Nordgren. Evolutionary Thinking: An Analysis of Rationality, Morality and Religion From an Evolutionary Perspective. Pp. 244. (Stockholm: Almqvist and Wicksell (Studia Philosophiae Religionis), 1994). SEK 218.Jean Porter. The Recovery of Virtue. Pp. 208. (London: S.P.C.K., 1994).Elizabeth S. Radcliffe and Carol J. White (Eds). Faith in Theory and Practice: Essays on Justifying Religious Belief. Pp. Xix + 235. (Chicago and La Salle, Illinois: Open Court, 1993).John E. Smith. Quasi-Religions: Humanism, Marxism and Nationalism. Pp. 154. (London and Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1994). £11–99 Pbk. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 31 (1):145.score: 135.0
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  4. Ulrich Schmidt (2012). An Examination of Michael J. Almedia's “The Metaphysics of Perfect Beings”. Philo 15 (1):38-54.score: 72.0
    A perfect being is a being which possesses all perfections essentially. A perfect being is essentially omniscient, essentially omnipotent, essentially perfectly good, and necessarily existing. In his excellent book “The Metaphysics of Perfect Beings” Michael J. Almeida investigates the following tough questions about perfect beings: What would a perfect being create? Which moral requirements would a perfect being (have to) fulfill when deciding what to create? Is there a minimum or a maximum amount of evil a perfect being would allow (...)
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  5. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2003). In Defense of Naïve Universalism. Faith and Philosophy 20 (3):345-363.score: 33.0
    Michael J. Murray defends the traditional doctrine of hell by arguing directly against its chief competitor, universalism. Universalism, says Murray, comes in “naïve” and “sophisticated” forms. Murray poses two arguments against naïve universalism before focusing on sophisticated universalism, which is his real target. He proceeds in this fashion because he thinks that his arguments against sophisticated universalism are more easily motivated against naïve universalism, and once their force is clearly seen in the naïve case they will be more clearly seen (...)
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  6. A. J. Coates (1997). The Ethics of War. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.score: 30.0
    Drawing on examples from the history of warfare from the crusades to the present day, "The ethics of war" explores the limits and possibilities of the moral regulation of war. While resisting the commonly held view that 'war is hell', A.J. Coates focuses on the tensions which exist between war and morality. The argument is conducted from a just war standpoint, though the moral ambiguity and mixed record of that tradition is acknowledge and the dangers which an exaggerated view of (...)
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  7. Raymond J. VanArragon (2001). Transworld Damnation and Craig's Contentious Suggestion. Faith and Philosophy 18 (2):241-260.score: 30.0
    In this paper I discuss William Lane Craig’s response to problems faced by Molinists who hold that an eternal hell exists and that most people who fail to accept Christ during their earthly lives end up there. Craig suggests that it is plausible to suppose that most people who fail to accept Christ suffer from transworld damnation, and that the fact that they do ensures that it is fair that they end up in hell regardless of whether they hear the (...)
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  8. Erik J. Olsson (2003). Avoiding Epistemic Hell: Levi on Pragmatism and Inconsistency. Synthese 135 (1):119 - 140.score: 30.0
    Isaac Levi has claimed that our reliance on the testimony of others, and on the testimony of the senses, commonly produces inconsistency in our set of full beliefs. This happens if what is reported is inconsistent with what we believe to be the case. Drawing on a conception of the role of beliefs in inquiry going back to Dewey, Levi has maintained that the inconsistent belief corpus is a state of ``epistemic hell'': it is useless as a basis for inquiry (...)
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  9. Mark Colyvan, Scientific Realism and Mathematical Nominalism: A Marriage Made in Hell.score: 27.0
    The Quine-Putnam Indispensability argument is the argument for treating mathematical entities on a par with other theoretical entities of our best scientific theories. This argument is usually taken to be an argument for mathematical realism. In this chapter I will argue that the proper way to understand this argument is as putting pressure on the viability of the marriage of scientific realism and mathematical nominalism. Although such a marriage is a popular option amongst philosophers of science and mathematics, in light (...)
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  10. Jeroen Mettes (2012). Political Poetry: A Few Notes. Poetics for N30. Continent 2 (1):29-35.score: 27.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 29–35. Translated by Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei from Jeroen Mettes. "Politieke Poëzie: Enige aantekeningen, Poëtica bij N30 (versie 2006)." In Weerstandbeleid: Nieuwe kritiek . Amsterdam: De wereldbibliotheek, 2011. Published with permission of Uitgeverij Wereldbibliotheek, Amsterdam. L’égalité veut d’autres lois . —Eugène Pottier The modern poem does not have form but consistency (that is sensed), no content but a problem (that is developed). Consistency + problem = composition. The problem of modern poetry is capitalism. Capitalism—which has no (...)
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  11. Samuel Vriezen (2012). The Poetry of Jeroen Mettes. Continent 2 (1):22-28.score: 27.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 22–28. Jeroen Mettes burst onto the Dutch poetry scene twice. First, in 2005, when he became a strong presence on the nascent Dutch poetry blogosphere overnight as he embarked on his critical project Dichtersalfabet (Poet’s Alphabet). And again in 2011, when to great critical acclaim (and some bafflement) his complete writings were published – almost five years after his far too early death. 2005 was the year in which Dutch poetry blogging exploded. That year saw the foundation (...)
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  12. Michael J. Almeida (2008). On Vague Eschatology. Faith and Philosophy 25 (4):359-375.score: 15.0
    Ted Sider’s Proportionality of Justice condition requires that any two moral agents instantiating nearly the same moral state be treated in nearly the same way. I provide a countermodel in supervaluation semantics to the proportionality of justice condition. It is possible that moral agents S and S' are in nearly the same moral state, S' is beyond all redemption and S is not. It is consistent with perfect justice then that moral agents that are not beyond redemption go determinately to (...)
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  13. Robert J. Hartman (2014). How to Apply Molinism to the Theological Problem of Moral Luck. Faith and Philosophy 31 (1):68-90.score: 15.0
    The problem of moral luck is that a general fact about luck and an intuitive moral principle jointly imply the following skeptical conclusion: human beings are morally responsible for at most a tiny fraction of each action. This skeptical conclusion threatens to undermine the claim that human beings deserve their respective eternal reward and punishment. But even if this restriction on moral responsibility is compatible with the doctrine of the final judgment, the quality of one’s afterlife within heaven or hell (...)
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