Search results for 'S. Runte Mary' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  34
    Debra Z. Basil, Mary S. Runte, M. Easwaramoorthy & Cathy Barr (2009). Company Support for Employee Volunteering: A National Survey of Companies in Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):387 - 398.
    Company support for employee volunteerism (CSEV) benefits companies, employees, and society while helping companies meet the expectations of corporate social responsibility (CSR). A nationally representative telephone survey of 990 Canadian companies examined CSEV through the lens of Porter and Kramer's (2006, 'Strategy and society: the link between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility', Harvard Business Review, 78-92.) CSR model. The results demonstrated that Canadian companies passively support employee volunteerism in a variety of ways, such as allowing employees to take time (...)
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  2.  14
    Z. Basil Debra, S. Runte Mary & Cathy Barr M. Easwaramoorthy (forthcoming). Company Support for Employee Volunteering: A National Survey of Companies in Canada. Journal of Business Ethics.
    Company support for employee volunteerism (CSEV) benefits companies, employees, and society while helping companies meet the expectations of corporate social responsibility (CSR). A nationally representative telephone survey of 990 Canadian companies examined CSEV through the lens of Porter and Kramer’s (2006, ‘Strategy and society: the link between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility’, Harvard Business Review , 78–92.) CSR model. The results demonstrated that Canadian companies passively support employee volunteerism in a variety of ways, such as allowing employees to take (...)
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  3.  10
    K. Hendrickson Mary, S. James Harvey & D. Heffernan William (2008). Does the World Need U.S. Farmers Even If Americans Don't? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4).
    We consider the implications of trends in the number of U.S. farmers and food imports on the question of what role U.S. farmers have in an increasingly global agrifood system. Our discussion stems from the argument some scholars have made that American consumers can import their food more cheaply from other countries than it can produce it. We consider the distinction between U.S. farmers and agriculture and the effect of the U.S. food footprint on developing nations to argue there might (...)
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  4.  6
    George Graham, Terence Horgan, Mary Mary & Quite Contrary (2000). Editorial 1 Knowing One's Own Actions George Wilson/Proximal Practical Foresight 3–19 Kevin Falvey/Knowledge in Intention 21–44 Nomy Arpaly/Hamlet and the Utilitarians 45–57. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 99:373-374.
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  5.  5
    Roseann Runte (1989). The Surprising Effects of Sympathy: Marivaux, Diderot, Rousseau and Mary Shelley (Review). Philosophy and Literature 13 (1):193-194.
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  6. Karen Detlefsen (2016). Custom Freedom and Equality: Mary Astell on Marriage and Women's Education. In Penny Weiss & Alice Sowaal (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell. Penn State University Press 74-92.
    Whatever may be said about contemporary feminists’ evaluation of Descartes’ role in the history of feminism, Mary Astell herself believed that Descartes’ philosophy held tremendous promise for women. His urging all people to eschew the tyranny of custom and authority in order to uncover the knowledge that could be found in each one of our unsexed souls potentially offered women a great deal of intellectual and personal freedom and power. Certainly Astell often read Descartes in this way, and Astell (...)
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  7.  59
    Aaron Simmons (2007). A Critique of Mary Anne Warren's Weak Animal Rights View. Environmental Ethics 29 (3):267-278.
    In her book, Moral Status, Mary Anne Warren defends a comprehensive theory of the moral status of various entities. Under this theory, she argues that animals may have some moral rights but that their rights are much weaker in strength than the rights of humans, who have rights in the fullest, strongest sense. Subsequently, Warren believes that our duties to animals are far weaker than our duties to other humans. This weakness is especially evident from the fact that Warren (...)
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  8. Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (2003). Introduction to There's Something About Mary. In Peter Ludlow, Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), There's Something About Mary.
    Mary is confined to a black-and-white room, is educated through black-and-white books and through lectures relayed on black-and white television. In this way she learns everything there is to know about the physical nature of the world. She knows all the physical facts about us and our environment, in a wide sense of 'physical' which includes everything in completed physics, chemistry, and neurophysiology, and all there is to know about the causal and relational facts consequent upon all this, including (...)
     
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  9.  10
    Martina Reuter (2014). “Like a Fanciful Kind of Half Being”: Mary Wollstonecraft's Criticism of Jean‐Jacques Rousseau. Hypatia 29 (4):925-941.
    The article investigates the philosophical foundations and details of Mary Wollstonecraft's criticism of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's views on the education and nature of women. I argue that Wollstonecraft's criticism must not be understood as a constructionist critique of biological reductionism. The first section analyzes the differences between Wollstonecraft's and Rousseau's views on the possibility of a true civilization and shows how these differences connect to their respective conceptions of moral psychology. The section shows that Wollstonecraft's disagreement with Rousseau's views on (...)
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  10. Luca Malatesti (2008). Mary's Scientific Knowledge. Prolegomena 7 (1):37-59.
    Frank Jackson’s knowledge argument (KA) aims to prove, by means of a thought experiment concerning the hypothetical scientist Mary, that conscious experiences have non-physical properties, called qualia. Mary has complete scientific knowledge of colours and colour vision without having had any colour experience. The central intuition in the KA is that, by seeing colours, Mary will learn what it is like to have colour experiences. Therefore, her scientific knowledge is incomplete, and conscious experiences have qualia. In this (...)
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  11.  68
    Nicholas Everitt (2014). Critical Review of Mary Midgley's Intelligent Design Theory and Other Ideological Problems. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (4):665-674.
    Mary Midgley's pamphlet Intelligent Design Theory and Other Ideological Problems has been a widely read contribution to discussions of the place of creationism in schools. In this critique of her account, I outline Midgley's view of the relations between science and religion, her claims about what material can legitimately appear in science lessons, and her account of the nature of religion. I argue that she is mistaken in all three areas, and show that her most plausible reply to these (...)
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  12.  18
    Claudia Rozas Gómez (2012). Strangers and Orphans: Knowledge and Mutuality in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (4):360-370.
    Paulo Freire consistently upheld humanization and mutuality as educational ideals. This article argues that conceptualizations of knowledge and how knowledge is sought and produced play a role in fostering humanization and mutuality in educational contexts. Drawing on Mary Shelley?s novel Frankenstein, this article focuses on the two central characters who ?ardently? pursue knowledge at all costs. It will be argued that the text suggests two possible outcomes from the pursuit of knowledge. One is mutuality; the other is social disconnectedness.
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  13. David Konstan (2010). « Review Of: Mary P. Nichols, Socrates On Friendship And Community: Reflections On Plato’s Symposium, Phaedrus, And Lysis ; And Laurence D. Cooper, Eros In Plato, Rousseau, And Nietzsche: The Politics Of Infinity ». [REVIEW] Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 10.
    Mary P. Nichols, Socrates on Friendship and Community: Reflections on Plato’s Symposium, Phaedrus, and Lysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Pp. viii + 229. ISBN 978-0-521-89973-4. Laurence D. Cooper, Eros in Plato, Rousseau, and Nietzsche: The Politics of Infinity. University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2008. Pp. xii + 357. ISBN 978-0-271-03330-3.
     
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  14. Diana I. Pérez (2011). Phenomenal Concepts, Color Experience, and Mary's Puzzle. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy (3):113-133.
    The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between phenomenal experience and our folk conceptualization of it. I will focus on the phenomenal concept strategy as an answer to Mary's puzzle. In the first part I present Mary's argument and the phenomenal concept strategy. In the second part I explain the requirements phenomenal concepts should satisfy in order to solve Mary's puzzle. In the third part I present various accounts of what a phenomenal concept is, (...)
     
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  15.  63
    Martina Fürst (2011). What Mary's Aboutness Is About. Acta Analytica 26 (1):63-74.
    The aim of this paper is to reinforce anti-physicalism by extending the hard problem to a specific kind of intentional states. For reaching this target, I investigate the mental content of the new intentional states of Jackson’s Mary. I proceed in the following way: I start analyzing the knowledge argument, which highlights the hard problem tied to phenomenal consciousness. In a second step, I investigate a powerful physicalist reply to this argument: the phenomenal concept strategy. In a third step, (...)
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  16.  6
    Lena Halldenius, Representation in Mary Wollstonecraft’s Political Philosophy.
    For Mary Wollstonecraft, the moral purpose of government is to act on the principle of equality and protect the weak against the fact of inequality. The political day-to-day is characterized by classes and groups with competing interests, some more powerful than others. Wollstonecraft was a republican thinker and so it is reasonable to expect in her writings a notion of political society as representative, but how? After placing Wollstonecraft in relation to contemporary republicanism, we can see that Wollstonecraft’s notion (...)
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  17. D. O'Neill (2002). Shifting the Scottish Paradigm: The Discourse of Morals and Manners in Mary Wollstonecraft's French Revolution. History of Political Thought 23 (1):90-116.
    In the past decade Mary Wollstonecraft has become an increasingly important figure in the history of political thought. However, relatively few interpretations of her work exist. This piece focuses on Wollstonecraft's least-read text, An Historical and Moral View of the Origin and Progress of the French Revolution; and the Effect It Has Produced in Europe . It provides a new interpretation of this work, one that stresses its relation to the Scottish Enlightenment. The argument is that Wollstonecraft's text can (...)
     
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  18.  10
    Lena Halldenius (2014). Mary Wollstonecraft's Feminist Critique of Property: On Becoming a Thief From Principle. Hypatia 29 (4):942-957.
    The scholarship on Mary Wollstonecraft is divided concerning her views on women's role in public life, property rights, and distribution of wealth. Her critique of inequality of wealth is undisputed, but is it a complaint only of inequality or does it strike more forcefully at the institution of property? The argument in this article is that Wollstonecraft's feminism is partly defined by a radical critique of property, intertwined with her conception of rights. Dissociating herself from the conceptualization of rights (...)
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  19.  11
    Eileen Botting (2013). Making an American Feminist Icon: Mary Wollstonecraft's Reception in Us Newspapers, 1800-1869. History of Political Thought 34 (2):273-295.
    This article examines Mary Wollstonecraft's public reception in American newspapers from 1800 to 1869. Wollstonecraft was portrayed to the American public as a philosopher of women's rights, a new model of femininity, and a pioneer of women's political activism. Although these iconic uses of Wollstonecraft were regularly negative, they grew more positive as the women's rights movement gained steam alongside the abolition movement.
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  20.  12
    Trevor G. Elkington (2004). Between Order and Chaos, on Peter Greenaway's Postmodern/Poststructuralist Cinema , Edited by Paula Willoquet-Maricondi and Mary Alemany-Galway. Film-Philosophy 8 (1).
    _Peter Greenaway's Postmodern/Poststructuralist Cinema_ Edited by Paula Willoquet-Maricondi and Mary Alemany-Galway Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, 2001 ISBN 0-8108-3892-3 xxviii + 360 pp.
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  21.  19
    Graham Allen (2011). The Gift and the Return: Deconstructing Mary Shelley's Lodore. Derrida Today 4 (1):44-58.
    This paper begins with Barbara Johnson's examination of the erasure of sexual difference within the Yale school, and in particular her comments upon the work of Mary Shelley. Taking up hints in her statements about the relation between Mary Shelley's work and deconstruction, I suggest a reading of Mary Shelley's penultimate novel, Lodore, in relation to Derrida's Given Time. Lodore, which traditionally appeared a rather conservative novel to Mary Shelley's critics, has a number of parallels in (...)
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  22.  1
    Zoe Beenstock (2016). Lyrical Sociability: The Social Contract and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):406-421.
    Although all readers of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein agree with Victor that his creation of the monster was a mistake, few are certain about how it should be resolved. Shelley offers two vexed solutions to the problem of the creature. The first, explored in the plot of Frankenstein, unfolds with an air of tragic inevitability; Victor destroys his creature and—by extension—himself. But the second solution that Shelley raises, through the creature’s earnest behest that Victor make him a partner, also presents (...)
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  23. Torin Alter (2005). Review of P. Ludlow, Y. Nagasawa & D. Stoljar , There's Something About Mary: Essays on Phenomenal Consciousness and Frank Jackson's Knowledge Argument. [REVIEW] Psyche 11.
    The titular ‘Mary’ refers to Jackson’s famous protagonist. Her story takes place in the future, when all physical facts have been discovered. This includes “everything in completed physics, chemistry, and neurophysiology, and all there is to know about the causal and relational facts consequent upon all this, including of course functional roles” . Mary learns all this by watching lectures on a monochromatic television monitor. But she spends her life in a black-and-white room and has no color experiences. (...)
     
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  24.  11
    T. P. Wiseman (1988). Hadrian's Rome Mary Taliaferro Boatwright: Hadrian and the City of Rome. Pp. Xx + 312; 1 Map; 60 Illustrations. Princeton University Press, 1987. £26.60. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (02):357-358.
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  25.  32
    Verity Harte (1995). Plato's Individuals Mary Margaret McCabe Princeton University Press, 1994, 399 Pages. [REVIEW] Philosophy 70 (274):594-.
  26.  13
    Peter Milward (2013). The French Queen's Letters: Mary Tudor Brandon and the Politics of Marriage in Sixteenth‐Century Europe. By Erin A. Sadlack. Pp.Xi, 266, NY, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, $71.24. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (3):488-489.
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  27.  6
    James Robert Brown (1990). The Philosophy of Set Theory: An Introduction to Cantor's Paradise Mary Tiles Oxford: Blackwell, 1989, X + 239 P. £30. Dialogue 29 (02):314-.
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  28.  2
    Justin D. Garwood (2013). A Review of “Teaching About Disabilities Through Children's Literature” Mary Anne Prater and Tina Taylor Dyches. Westport, CT: Teacher Ideas Press, 2008; 131 Pp. $30.99. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 49 (3):285-289.
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  29.  3
    C. W. Hendel (1933). Book Review:Studies in the Eighteenth Century Background of Hume's Empiricism. Mary Shaw Kuypers. [REVIEW] Ethics 43 (3):361-.
  30. Sylvia Huot (1993). Poems of Cupid, God of Love: Christine de Pizan's "Epistre au Dieu d'Amours" and "Dit de la Rose"; Thomas Hoccleve's "The Letter of Cupid," with George Sewell's "The Proclamation of Cupid."Thelma S. Fenster Mary Carpenter Erler. Speculum 68 (1):141-142.
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  31.  2
    Mary A. Mccloskey (1976). Kant's Kingdom of Ends: Mary A. McCloskey. Philosophy 51 (198):391-399.
    There are many uses of the word ‘ought’, not all of which are moral uses. The following sentences contain ‘oughts’ which are not moral ‘oughts’. The peaches on the tree nearest the house ought to be ripe. The old car ought to go now it's had a re-bore. You ought to prune your Lorraine Lee roses in February. You ought to wash your hands before meals. You ought to take more exercise.
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  32. Catherine Johnson (1995). The Interrelation of Mary Wollstonecraft's a Vindication of the Rights of Woman with Rousseau's Philosophy and Why This is of Value to Feminism.
     
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  33. Pete Mandik (2010). Swamp Mary's Revenge: Deviant Phenomenal Knowledge and Physicalism. Philosophical Studies 148 (2):231 - 247.
    Deviant phenomenal knowledge is knowing what it's like to have experiences of, e. g., red without actually having had experiences of red. Such a knower is a deviant. Some physicalists have argued and some anti-physicalists have denied that the possibility of deviants undermines anti-physicalism and the Knowledge Argument. The current paper presents new arguments defending the deviant-based attacks on anti-physicalism. Central to my arguments are considerations concerning the psychosemantic underpinnings of deviant phenomenal knowledge. I argue that physicalists are in a (...)
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  34.  37
    Catriona MacKenzie (1993). Reason and Sensibility: The Ideal of Women's Self-Governance in the Writings of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 8 (4):35 - 55.
    It is standard in feminist commentaries to argue that Wollstonecraft's feminism is vitiated by her commitment to a liberal philosophical framework, relying on a valuation of reason over passion and on the notion of a sex-neutral self. I challenge this interpretation of Wollstonecraft's feminism and argue that her attempt to articulate an ideal of self-governance for women was an attempt to diagnose and resolve some of the tensions and inadequacies within traditional liberal thought.
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  35.  11
    Whipps (2014). A Pragmatist Reading of Mary Parker Follett's Integrative Process. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (3):405.
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  36. Torin Alter (1995). Mary's New Perspective. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (4):585-84.
    I wish to consider an objection to Frank Jackson's knowledge argument recently made by Derk Pereboom.
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  37.  20
    H. Davies (2004). Can Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Be Read as an Early Research Ethics Text? Medical Humanities 30 (1):32-35.
    The current, popular view of the novel Frankenstein is that it describes the horrors consequent upon scientific experimentation; the pursuit of science leading inevitably to tragedy. In reality the importance of the book is far from this. Although the evil and tragedy resulting from one medical experiment are its theme, a critical and fair reading finds a more balanced view that includes science’s potential to improve the human condition and reasons why such an experiment went awry. The author argues that (...)
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  38.  14
    Daniel Lim & Wang Hao (2014). Can Mary's Qualia Be Epiphenomenal? Res Philosophica 91 (3):503-512.
    Frank Jackson famously argued, with his so-called Knowledge Argument , that qualia are non-physical. Moreover, he argued that qualia are epiphenomenal. Some have objected that epiphenomenalism is inconsistent with the soundness of KA. One way of developing this objection, following Neil Campbell , is to argue that epiphenomenalism is at odds with the kind of behavioral evidence that makes the soundness of KA plausible. We argue that Campbell’s claim that epiphenomenalism is inconsistent with the soundness of KA is false.
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  39. S. Tomaselli (2005). Saba Bahar: Mary Wollstonecraft's Social and Aesthetic Philosophy:An Eve to Please Me'. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3).
     
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  40.  6
    Jane Duran (2014). Christianity and Women's Education: Anna Maria van Schurman and Mary Astell. Philosophy and Theology 26 (1):3-18.
    A contrast is developed between the educational views of van Schurman and Astell, revolving around their sense of Christian piety and their stance on women’s place in the social and political sphere. The work of Irwin, Hill, and others is cited, and it is concluded that important differences between the views of the two thinkers can be delineated, and that doing so helps us to understand the intellectual and philosophical milieu of the seventeenth century. In addition, the debate sheds light (...)
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  41. Daniel Lim & Hao Wang (2014). Can Mary's Qualia Be Epiphenomenal? Res Philosophica 91 (3):503-512.
    Frank Jackson (1982) famously argued, with his so-called Knowledge Argument (KA), that qualia are non-physical. Moreover, he argued that qualia are epiphenomenal. Some have objected that epiphenomenalism is inconsistent with the soundness of KA. One way of developing this objection, following Neil Campbell (2003; 2012), is to argue that epiphenomenalism is at odds with the kind of behavioral evidence that makes the soundness of KA plausible. We argue that Campbell’s claim that epiphenomenalism is inconsistent with the soundness of KA is (...)
     
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  42.  12
    Tina Chanter, Antigone's Exemplarity: Irigaray, Hegel, and Excluded Grounds as Constitutive of Feminist Theory In: Rawlinson, Mary C. , Hom, Sabrina L. And Khader, Serene J., (Eds.) Thinking with Irigaray. Albany, U.S. : State University of New York Press, 2011, Pp. 265-292. ISBN 9781438439174.
    Irigaray raises the question of sexual difference. Yet there are moments at which Irigaray’s own pursuit of this question recapitulates the kind of universalism it is meant to combat. She remains ensconced in judgments that close down the attempt to think beyond sexual difference. The article pursues this line of thought particularly in relation to her figuring of Antigone, suggesting that there is a need to open up sexual difference so that it does not function as a universal discourse, but (...)
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  43.  5
    John T. Ford C. S. C. (2011). Sister Mary Christopher Ludden, S.C. (1921-2011). Newman Studies Journal 8 (2):101-101.
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  44.  15
    Susan Khin Zaw (1998). The Reasonable Heart: Mary Wollstonecraft's View of the Relation Between Reason and Feeling in Morality, Moral Psychology, and Moral Development. Hypatia 13 (1):78 - 117.
    Wollstonecraft's early works express a coherent view of moral psychology, moral education and moral philosophy which guides the construction of her early fiction and educational works. It includes a valuable account of the relation between reason and feeling in moral development. Failure to recognize the complexity and coherence of the view and unhistorical readings have led to mistaken criticisms of Wollstonecraft's position. Part I answers these criticisms; Part II describes and textually supports her view.
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  45.  7
    Jong Hwan Lee (2013). Philosophos: Plato's Missing Dialogue by Mary Louise Gill (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (4):675-676.
    Many readers of Plato find it difficult to figure out what the author is really arguing in his works. Unlike other philosophical writing, most of Plato’s works are dialogues, which causes difficulty because Plato does not clearly endorse any one of the characters as his spokesman. In order to overcome this, readers should presumably exercise their own reason when reading Plato’s dialogues in order to find out what the author’s main idea is. In fact, this is exactly what Plato expects (...)
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  46.  14
    S. L. Greenslade (1954). Mary Francis McDonald: Saint Augustine's De Fide Rerum Quae Non Videntur. A Critical Text and Translation with Introduction and Commentary. (Patristic Studies, Vol. Lxxxiv.) Pp. Xvi+148. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 1950. Paper, $1.75.S. Dominic Ruegg: Sancti Aurelii Augustini, De Utilitate Leiunii. A Text with a Translation, Introduction and Commentary. (Patristic Studies, Vol. Lxxxv.) Pp. Xviii+134. Washington, D.C: Catholic University of America Press, 1951. Paper, $1.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (02):170-171.
  47.  13
    O. S. Pickering (1972). Some Similarities Between Queen Mary's Psalter and the Northern Passion. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 35:135-144.
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  48. Yujin Nagasawa, Perry and Mary: Review of John Perry's Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness. [REVIEW]
    John Perry’s Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness is based on the Jean Nicod Lectures, which he gave in Paris in 1999. The main goal of this book is to defend what he calls ‘antecedent physicalism’ from various common objections to physicalism. I do not agree with Perry’s approach to the problem of phenomenal consciousness; in particular, I disagree with his approach to the knowledge argument. Nevertheless, I found his book extremely helpful in understanding complex issues in the recent debate on the (...)
     
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  49.  3
    Birute Arendarcikas (2014). 'God so Loved the World, That He Was Born of a Woman': Mary's Place in God's Loving of His Creation. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (2):194.
    Arendarcikas, Birute Since the Second Vatican Council and the historic embrace of Paul VI and the Patriarch of Constantinople Athenagoras I in January 1964, the pope and the hierarchs of the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches have, after centuries of mutual separation, embraced each other once again as sister churches. On many occasions the pope and the hierarchs of the respective churches have drawn attention to the loving veneration of, and special devotion to, Mary, the Mother of God, (...)
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  50. Ella Lyman Cabot & John Kaag (2008). Project MUSE Journals Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy Volume 44, Number 1, Winter 2008 Women and Forgotten Movements in American Philosophy: The Work of Ella Lyman Cabot and Mary Parker Follett. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (1).
     
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