6 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Sheldon Sacks [4]S. Sacks [3]
  1. A. J. Cronin, J. Douglas & S. Sacks (2012). Licenced to Transplant: UK Overkill on EU Organ Directive Provides Golden Opportunity for Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):593-595.
    Progress in transplantation outcomes depends on continuing research into both donor and recipient factors that may enhance graft and patient survival. A system of licencing for transplantation research, introduced by the Human Tissue Act 2004, which separates it from the transplantation process (then exempt from licencing), has damaged this vital activity by a combination of inflexible interpretation of the 2004 Act and fear of criminal liability on the part of researchers. Now, following the European Union (EU) Directive (2010) on standards (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. A. J. Cronin & S. Sacks (2011). The Ethics of Organ Retrieval: Goals, Rights and Responsibilities. Clinical Ethics 6 (3):111-112.
  3. J. Reynolds, N. Crichton, W. Fisher & S. Sacks (2008). Determining the Need for Ethical Review: A Three-Stage Delphi Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):889-894.
    Aims: The aims of the study were to explore expert opinion on the distinction between “research” and “audit”, and to determine the need for review by a National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee (REC). Background: Under current guidelines only “research” projects within the NHS require REC approval. Concerns have been expressed over difficulties in distinguishing between research and other types of project, and no existing guidelines appear to have been validated. The implications of this confusion include unnecessary REC applications, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Sheldon Sacks (1979). The Pursuit of Lew Archer. Critical Inquiry 6 (2):231.
    For example, in the traditional "who done it" , the basic pleasure is in the creation and solution of the riddle itself - somewhat akin to the pleasure of solving a difficult crossword puzzle. In such works the riddle itself must be sufficiently ingenious to surprise us but never so labyrinthine as to destroy the illusion that we may beat the professional to the solution. In no case may necessary clues be withheld for, failing to solve the riddle ourselves, we (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Sheldon Sacks (1976). Chimera II: The Margins of Mutual Comprehension. Critical Inquiry 2 (4):3-630.
    The publication in this issue of Leonard B. Meyer’s superbly detailed analysis of the Trio of Mozart’s G Minor Symphony became the occasion of us to reexamine and restate some of the general aims of Critical Inquiry. From its inception Critical Inquiry was based on the assumption that we can indeed understand each other, at least to the point where critical exchange becomes meaningful and fruitful. It is this belief, for example, that has led us to eschew the more fiery (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Sheldon Sacks (1974). A Chimera for a Breakfast. Critical Inquiry 1 (1):1-3.
    If the editor had done a proper job, his introductory rhetoric would have been superfluous. Indeed in the second fit of hubris immediately consequent upon the heady act of initiating CRITICAL INQUIRY, its coeditors agreed that the success of our venture must be measured by the precise degree to which this issue was self-defining. Our goals would be fully explained by our accomplishment. Our commitment to reasoned inquiry into significant creations of the human spirit would be transformed from proclamation to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation