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Profile: S. Seth Bordner (University of Alabama)
  1.  45
    S. Seth Bordner (forthcoming). Immaterialism and Common Sense. In Bertil Belfrage & Richard Brook (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Berkeley. Continuum
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  2.  97
    Jamin Asay & S. Seth Bordner (2015). A Modest Defense of Manifestationalism. Synthese 192 (1):147-161.
    As the debate between realists and empiricists in the philosophy of science drags on, one point of consensus has emerged: no one wants to be a manifestationalist. The manifestationalist is a kind of radical empiricist who argues that science provides theories that aim neither at a true picture of the entire world, nor even an empirically adequate picture that captures the world in all its observable respects. For manifestationalists, science aims only at providing theories that are true to the observed (...)
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  3.  7
    S. Seth Bordner (2014). Call ‘Em as They Are: What’s Wrong with Blown Calls and What to Do About Them. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (1):101-120.
    Mistaken judgments of fact by sporting officials – blown calls – are ubiquitous in sport and have altered the outcomes of games, championships, and even the record books. I argue that the effect these blown calls have on sports is deplorable, even unjust, and that given both the nature of sport in general and the social and economic importance of sports as they are played today, we ought to use technology to aid officials in making their judgments whenever doing so (...)
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  4.  90
    S. Seth Bordner (2011). Berkeley's "Defense" of "Commonsense". Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):315-338.
    Berkeley scholars can hardly resist dealing with the question of how his philosophical system relates to commonsense. It is an irresistible question because it first appears to have a sensational answer. On the one hand, Berkeley claims to "side in all things with the Mob," and on the other, his denial of the existence of matter seems as contrary to commonsense as any philosophical view can be. The articles, chapters, books and conference papers on this one aspect of Berkeley's philosophy (...)
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  5.  7
    S. Seth Bordner (2015). ‘All-Things-Considered,’ ‘Better-Than,’ And Sports Rankings. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (2):215-232.
    Comparative judgments abound in sports. Fans and pundits bandy about which of two players or teams is bigger, faster, stronger, more talented, less injury prone, more reliable, safer to bet on, riskier to trade for, and so on. Arguably, of most interest are judgments of a coarser type: which of two players or teams is, all-things-considered, just plain better? Conventionally, it is accepted that such comparisons can be appropriately captured and expressed by sports rankings. Rankings play an important role in (...)
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  6.  16
    S. Seth Bordner (2012). George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 32 (4):313-315.
  7.  1
    S. Seth Bordner (forthcoming). All-Things-Considered,’ ‘Better-Than,’ And Sports Rankings‘. ‘All-Things-Considered,’ ‘Better-Than,’ and Sports Rankings:1-18.
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  8. S. Seth Bordner (forthcoming). If We Stop Thinking About Berkeley's Problem of Continuity, Will It Still Exist? Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    Berkeley holds that the esse of sensible objects is percipi. So, sensible objects cannot exist unperceived. Naturally, this has invited questions about the existence of sensible objects when unperceived by finite minds. This is sometimes called the Problem of Continuity. It is frequently said that Berkeley solves the problem by invoking God’s ever-present perception to ensure that sensible objects maintain a continuous existence. Problems with this line of response have led some to a phenomenalist interpretation. This paper argues that neither (...)
     
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