Search results for 'S. T. Adams' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Merrihew Adams (2001). Scanlon's Contractualism: Critical Notice of T. M. Scanlon, "What We Owe to Each Other". Philosophical Review 110 (4):563-586.
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  2. Ernest W. Adams (1984). Convention T's Pragmatic and Semantic Association, and Its Limitations. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 65 (2):124.
     
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  3.  13
    P. L. S. (1934). S. T. Coleridge's Treatise on Method as Published in the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 31 (19):528-529.
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  4. Frederick R. Adams (1993). Reply to Russow's Fodor, Adams and Causal Properties. Philosophical Psychology 6 (1):63-65.
     
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  5.  20
    Doug Adams (1975). II. "Implications of Polanyi's Thought Within the Arts" A Bibliographic Essay" by Doug Adams. Tradition and Discovery 2 (2):3-5.
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  6.  11
    A. Beckmann & A. Weiermann (2000). Analyzing Godel's T Via Expanded Head Reduction Trees. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 46 (4):517-536.
    Inspired from Buchholz' ordinal analysis of ID1 and Beckmann's analysis of the simple typed λ-calculus we classify the derivation lengths for Gödel's system T in the λ-formulation.
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  7.  8
    P. T. Stevens (1960). Sophocles the Playwright S. M. Adams: Sophocles the Playwright. Pp. Ix + 182. (The Phoenix, Supplementary Vol. Iii.) Toronto: University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1957. Paper, 38s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 10 (01):21-23.
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  8.  21
    Ming Hsiung (2009). Jump Liars and Jourdain's Card Via the Relativized T-Scheme. Studia Logica 91 (2):239 - 271.
    A relativized version of Tarski’s T-scheme is introduced as a new principle of the truth predicate. Under the relativized T-scheme, the paradoxical objects, such as the Liar sentence and Jourdain’s card sequence, are found to have certain relative contradictoriness. That is, they are contradictory only in some frames in the sense that any valuation admissible for them in these frames will lead to a contradiction. It is proved that for any positive integer n , the n -jump liar sentence is (...)
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  9.  72
    Dominic Griffiths (2015). The Poet as ‘Worldmaker’: T.S. Eliot and the Religious Imagination. In Francesca Knox & David Lonsdale (eds.), The Power of the Word: Poetry and the Religious Imagination. Ashgate 161-175.
    Martin Heidegger defines the world as ‘the ever non-objective to which we are subject as long as the paths of birth and death . . . keep us transported into Being’. He writes that the world is ‘not the mere collection of the countable or uncountable, familiar and unfamiliar things that are at hand . . . The world worlds’. Being able to fully and richly express how the world worlds is the task of the artist, whose artwork is the (...)
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  10.  47
    Dominic Griffiths (2014). Looking Into the Heart of Light: Considering the Poetic Event in the Work of T.S. Eliot and Martin Heidegger. Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):350-367.
    No one is quite sure what happened to T.S. Eliot in that rose-garden. What we do know is that it formed the basis for Four Quartets, arguably the greatest English poem written in the twentieth century. Luckily it turns out that Martin Heidegger, when not pondering the meaning of being, spent a great deal of time thinking and writing about the kind of event that Eliot experienced. This essay explores how Heidegger developed the concept of Ereignis, “event” which, in (...)
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  11. Dominic Heath Griffiths (2012). 'A Raid on the Inarticulate': Exploring Authenticity, Ereignis and Dwelling in Martin Heidegger and T.S. Eliot. Dissertation, University of Auckland
    This thesis explores, thematically and chronologically, the substantial concordance between the work of Martin Heidegger and T.S. Eliot. The introduction traces Eliot's ideas of the 'objective correlative' and 'situatedness' to a familiarity with German Idealism. Heidegger shared this familiarity, suggesting a reason for the similarity of their thought. Chapter one explores the 'authenticity' developed in Being and Time, as well as associated themes like temporality, the 'they' (Das Man), inauthenticity, idle talk and angst, and applies them to interpreting Eliot's poem, (...)
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  12. Gregory S. Jay & T. S. Eliot (1983). T.S. Eliot and the Poetics of Literary History.
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  13.  8
    W. T. Lendrum (1900). Adam's Hesiod and Pindar A Comparative Study of Hesiod and Pindar. By John Scott Adams. Chicago. The University of Chicago Press. PP. 47. 1899. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 14 (01):63-64.
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  14. J. T. Shotwell (1916). Hythian-Adams's Mithraism. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 13 (18):501.
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  15. Anna Pietryga (2007). Tarski's T-Scheme as an Alleged Basis of Montague Semantics. Logic and Logical Philosophy 15 (4):369-379.
    My point in this paper is to focus on some details of Alfred Tarski’s writing that in my opinion have not been aptly represented — or aptly rejected — in Richard Montague’s grammar and to agree with those who share Tarski’s view that human language is something uncapturable. The paper consists of two parts, concerning 1) some attempts to formalize the non-declarative utterances, and 2) the limitations of T-scheme and of Montague grammar.
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  16. Richard Dietz & Igor Douven (2010). Ramsey’s Test, Adams’ Thesis, and Left-Nested Conditionals. Review of Symbolic Logic 3 (3):467-484.
    Adams famously suggested that the acceptability of any indicative conditional whose antecedent and consequent are both factive sentences amounts to the subjective conditional probability of the consequent given the antecedent. The received view has it that this thesis offers an adequate partial explication of Ramsey’s test, which characterizes graded acceptability for conditionals in terms of hypothetical updates on the antecedent. Some results in van Fraassen may raise hope that this explicatory approach to Ramsey’s test is extendible to left-nested conditionals, (...)
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  17.  19
    Felix Joachimski & Ralph Matthes (2003). Short Proofs of Normalization for the Simply- Typed Λ-Calculus, Permutative Conversions and Gödel's T. Archive for Mathematical Logic 42 (1):59-87.
    Inductive characterizations of the sets of terms, the subset of strongly normalizing terms and normal forms are studied in order to reprove weak and strong normalization for the simply-typed λ-calculus and for an extension by sum types with permutative conversions. The analogous treatment of a new system with generalized applications inspired by generalized elimination rules in natural deduction, advocated by von Plato, shows the flexibility of the approach which does not use the strong computability/candidate style à la Tait and Girard. (...)
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  18. Andreas Weiermann (1998). How is It That Infinitary Methods Can Be Applied to Finitary Mathematics? Gödel's T: A Case Study. Journal of Symbolic Logic 63 (4):1348-1370.
    Inspired by Pohlers' local predicativity approach to Pure Proof Theory and Howard's ordinal analysis of bar recursion of type zero we present a short, technically smooth and constructive strong normalization proof for Gödel's system T of primitive recursive functionals of finite types by constructing an ε 0 -recursive function [] 0 : T → ω so that a reduces to b implies [a] $_0 > [b]_0$ . The construction of [] 0 is based on a careful analysis of the Howard-Schütte (...)
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  19. Russell Kirk (1971). Eliot and His Age T. S. Eliot's Moral Imagination in the Twentieth Century. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  20. William H. Quillian (1983). Hamlet and the New Poetic James Joyce and T.S. Eliot.
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  21. Martin Warner (1999). A Philosophical Study of T.S. Eliot's Four Quartets. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  22.  8
    Arnold Beckmann & Andreas Weiermann (2000). Characterizing the Elementary Recursive Functions by a Fragment of Gödel's T. Archive for Mathematical Logic 39 (7):475-491.
    Let T be Gödel's system of primitive recursive functionals of finite type in a combinatory logic formulation. Let $T^{\star}$ be the subsystem of T in which the iterator and recursor constants are permitted only when immediately applied to type 0 arguments. By a Howard-Schütte-style argument the $T^{\star}$ -derivation lengths are classified in terms of an iterated exponential function. As a consequence a constructive strong normalization proof for $T^{\star}$ is obtained. Another consequence is that every $T^{\star}$ -representable number-theoretic function is elementary (...)
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  23.  2
    Klaus Aehlig & Felix Joachimski (2005). Continuous Normalization for the Lambda-Calculus and Gödel’s T. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 133 (1-3):39-71.
    Building on previous work by Mints, Buchholz and Schwichtenberg, a simplified version of continuous normalization for the untyped λ-calculus and Gödel’s is presented and analysed in the coalgebraic framework of non-wellfounded terms with so-called repetition constructors.The primitive recursive normalization function is uniformly continuous w.r.t. the natural metric on non-wellfounded terms. Furthermore, the number of necessary repetition constructors is locally related to the number of reduction steps needed to reach the normal form and its size.It is also shown how continuous normal (...)
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  24. Uri Zoller, J. Ebenezer, K. Morely, S. Paras, V. Sandberg, C. West, T. Wolthers & S. H. Tan (1990). Goal Attainment in Science‐Technology‐Society (S/T/S) Education and Reality: The Case of British Columbia. Science Education 74 (1):19-36.
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  25.  95
    Ittay Nissan-Rozen (2013). Jeffrey Conditionalization, the Principal Principle, the Desire as Belief Thesis, and Adams's Thesis. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (4):axs039.
    I show that David Lewis’s principal principle is not preserved under Jeffrey conditionalization. Using this observation, I argue that Lewis’s reason for rejecting the desire as belief thesis and Adams’s thesis applies also to his own principal principle. 1 Introduction2 Adams’s Thesis, the Desire as Belief Thesis, and the Principal Principle3 Jeffrey Conditionalization4 The Principal Principles Not Preserved under Jeffrey Conditionalization5 Inadmissible Experiences.
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  26.  67
    David Decosimo (2012). Intrinsic Goodness and Contingency, Resemblance and Particularity: Two Criticisms of Robert Adams's Finite and Infinite Goods. Studies in Christian Ethics 25 (4):418-441.
    Robert Adams’s Finite and Infinite Goods is one of the most important and innovative contributions to theistic ethics in recent memory. This article identifies two major flaws at the heart of Adams’s theory: his notion of intrinsic value and his claim that ‘excellence’ or finite goodness is constituted by resemblance to God. I first elucidate Adams’s complex, frequently misunderstood claims concerning intrinsic value and Godlikeness. I then contend that Adams’s notion of intrinsic value cannot explain (...)
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  27.  6
    James Wetzel (2006). God in the Cave: A Look Back at Robert Merrihew Adams's "Finite and Infinite Goods". [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (3):485 - 520.
    When "Finite and Infinite Goods" was published in 1999, it took its place as one of the few major statements of a broadly Augustinian ethical philosophy of the past century. By "broadly Augustinian" I refer to the disposition to combine a Platonic emphasis on a transcendent source of value with a traditionally theistic emphasis on the value-creating capacities of absolute will. In the form that this disposition takes with Robert Merrihew Adams, it is the resemblance between divine and a (...)
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  28. Greg Ray (2006). Tarski's Grelling and the T-Strategy. In Bryson Brown (ed.), Truth and Probability: Essays in Honour of Hugues Leblanc. College Publications
    Tarski's argumentative use of the liar paradox is well-known, but officially it is the Grelling paradox that has final pride of place in Tarski's argument, not the Liar at all. Tarski explicitly gives argumentation that adverts to the liar argument, but it is an alternative argument—one he only hints at and which adverts to the Grelling—which he says has the advantage of removing any empirical element. In this paper, we will examine how the Grelling might be used in place of (...)
     
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  29. S. Andrew Schroeder (2011). You Don't Have to Do What's Best! (A Problem for Consequentialists and Other Teleologists). In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, vol. 1. Oxford University Press
    Define teleology as the view that requirements hold in virtue of facts about value or goodness. Teleological views are quite popular, and in fact some philosophers (e.g. Dreier, Smith) argue that all (plausible) moral theories can be understood teleologically. I argue, however, that certain well-known cases show that the teleologist must at minimum assume that there are certain facts that an agent ought to know, and that this means that requirements can't, in general, hold in virtue of facts about value (...)
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  30. Robert Northcott & A. Alexandrova (2015). Prisoner's Dilemma Doesn't Explain Much. In Martin Peterson (ed.), The Prisoner’s Dilemma. Cambridge 64-84.
    We make the case that the Prisoner’s Dilemma, notwithstanding its fame and the quantity of intellectual resources devoted to it, has largely failed to explain any phenomena of social scientific or biological interest. In the heart of the paper we examine in detail a famous purported example of Prisoner’s Dilemma empirical success, namely Axelrod’s analysis of WWI trench warfare, and argue that this success is greatly overstated. Further, we explain why this negative verdict is likely true generally and not just (...)
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  31.  19
    Mary K. Hendrickson, Harvey S. James & William D. Heffernan (2008). Does the World Need U.S. Farmers Even If Americans Don't? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):311-328.
    We consider the implications of trends in the number of U.S. farmers and food imports on the question of what role U.S. farmers have in an increasingly global agrifood system. Our discussion stems from the argument some scholars have made that American consumers can import their food more cheaply from other countries than it can produce it. We consider the distinction between U.S. farmers and agriculture and the effect of the U.S. food footprint on developing nations to argue there might (...)
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  32. T. S. Champlin (1977). Self-Deception: A Reflexive Dilemma: T. S. Champlin. Philosophy 52 (201):281-299.
    It is not easy to see how self-deception is possible because the man who deceives himself seems to be required to play two incompatible roles, that of deceiver and that of deceived. This makes self-deception sound about as difficult as presiding at one's own funeral. Many attempts have been made to remove the air of paradox from self-deception. These attempts are all unsuccessful, and they are best seen as expressions of philosophical puzzlement rather than as actual solutions. In particular, the (...)
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  33.  14
    Mats Bergman (2007). Development, Purpose, and the Spectre of Anthropomorphism: Sundry Comments on T. L. Short's Peirce's Theory of Signs. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4):601 - 609.
    T. L. Short's Peirce's Theory of Signs offers a strong interpretation of semeiotic, advocating a developmental and naturalistic position. This commentary examines some of the main features of Short's approach, raising a number of critical questions concerning the growth of Peirce's thought and the problem of anthropomorphism. First, two possible weaknesses in Short's account of the development of semeiotic, connected to the treatment of the "New List of Categories" and the role of the index, are noted. Next, the menace of (...)
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  34.  19
    Mats Bergman (2007). Development, Purpose, and the Spectre of Anthropomorphism: Sundry Comments on T. L. Short's. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4).
    : T. L. Short's Peirce's Theory of Signs offers a strong interpretation of semeiotic, advocating a developmental and naturalistic position. This commentary examines some of the main features of Short's approach, raising a number of critical questions concerning the growth of Peirce's thought and the problem of anthropomorphism. First, two possible weaknesses in Short's account of the development of semeiotic, connected to the treatment of the "New List of Categories" and the role of the index, are noted. Next, the menace (...)
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  35.  11
    T. K. Abbott (1887). Lexicons to the Greek Testament A Greek English Lexicon of the New Testament, Being Grimm's Wilke's Clavis Novi Testamenti. Translated, Revised and Enlarged by Joseph Henry Thayer, D.D., Bussey Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation in the Divinity School of Harvard University. Edinburgh, T. And T. Clark. 1886. 4to. Pp. 726. 36s. Biblico Theological Lexicon to New Testament Greek. By Hermann Cremer, D.D., Professor of Theology in the University of Greifswald. Third English Edition. With Supplement. Translated From the Latest German Edition by William Uewick, M.A. Edinburgh, T. And T. Clark. 1886. 4to. Pp. 943. 38s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (04):106-109.
    A Greek English Lexicon of the New Testament, being Grimm's Wilke's Clavis Novi Testamenti. Translated, Revised and Enlarged by Joseph Henry Thayer, D.D., Bussey Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation in the Divinity School of Harvard University. Edinburgh, T. and T. Clark. 1886. 4to. pp. 726. 36s.Biblico Theological Lexicon to New Testament Greek. by Hermann Cremer, D.D., Professor of Theology in the University of Greifswald. Third English Edition. With Supplement. Translated from the latest German Edition by William Uewick, M.A. (...)
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  36.  14
    James Jakób Liszka (2007). Teleology and Semiosis: Commentary on T. L. Short's. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4).
    : According to T.L. Short, Peirce's early thought-sign account of semeiotic engenders fatal flaws. On the one hand, it entails an infinite regressus of representation that cannot feasibly explain the connection between signs and objects and, on the other, an infinite progressus, leaving Peirce's theory without the wherewithal to account for the sign's meaning and significance. According to Short, Peirce overcomes the first flaw through the robust development of the notion of the index and the concept of collateral experience. The (...)
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  37.  8
    K. Hendrickson Mary, S. James Harvey & D. Heffernan William (2008). Does the World Need U.S. Farmers Even If Americans Don't? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4).
    We consider the implications of trends in the number of U.S. farmers and food imports on the question of what role U.S. farmers have in an increasingly global agrifood system. Our discussion stems from the argument some scholars have made that American consumers can import their food more cheaply from other countries than it can produce it. We consider the distinction between U.S. farmers and agriculture and the effect of the U.S. food footprint on developing nations to argue there might (...)
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  38.  10
    Manju Jain (1992/2004). T.S. Eliot and American Philosophy: The Harvard Years. Cambridge University Press.
    Manju Jain's innovative study of T. S. Eliot 's Harvard years traces the genesis of his major literary, religious and intellectual preoccupations in his early work as a student of philosophy, and explores its influence on his poetic and critical practice. His concerns were located within the mainstream of Harvard philosophical debates, especially in relation to the controversy of science versus religion. These questions point forward to important debates in contemporary philosophy and hermeneutics. Drawing extensively on unpublished sources, Manju Jain (...)
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  39.  62
    David Schweickart, Economic Democracy: A W o R T H y S o C I a L I S M That Would Really Work.
    w a y s h a v e b e e n . W e a l l r e m e m b e r M a r x ' s p o l e m i c a g a i n s t P r o u d h o n , t h e Manifesto's critique of "historical action [yielding] to personal inventive action, historically created conditions of emancipation to fantastic ones, and the gradual spontaneous class (...)
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  40. Igor Douven (2010). Ramsey's Test, Adams' Thesis, and Left-Nested Conditionals. Review of Symbolic Logic 3 (3):467-484.
    Adams famously suggested that the acceptability of any indicative conditional whose antecedent and consequent are both factive sentences amounts to the subjective conditional probability of the consequent given the antecedent. The received view has it that this thesis offers an adequate partial explication of Ramseys test is extendible to left-nested conditionals, that is, conditionals whose antecedent is itself conditional in form. We argue that this interpretation of van Fraassen thesis for left-nested conditionals.
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  41. Alexander Sarch (2011). Internalism About a Person's Good: Don't Believe It. Philosophical Studies 154 (2):161-184.
    Internalism about a person's good is roughly the view that in order for something to intrinsically enhance a person's well-being, that person must be capable of caring about that thing. I argue in this paper that internalism about a person's good should not be believed. Though many philosophers accept the view, Connie Rosati provides the most comprehensive case in favor of it. Her defense of the view consists mainly in offering five independent arguments to think that at least some form (...)
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  42.  77
    J. Kevin O'Regan & Ned Block (2012). Discussion of J. Kevin O'Regan's “Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness”. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):89-108.
    Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’t Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness” Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-20 DOI 10.1007/s13164-012-0090-7 Authors J. Kevin O’Regan, Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, CNRS - Université Paris Descartes, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères, 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France Ned Block, Departments of Philosophy, Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University, 5 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA Journal Review of Philosophy and (...)
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  43.  42
    John Perry (2008). Can't We All Just Be Compatibilists?: A Critical Study of John Martin Fischer's My Way. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):157 - 166.
    My aim in this study is not to praise Fischer's fine theory of moral responsibility, but to (try to) bury the "semi" in "semicompatibilism". I think Fischer gives the Consequence Argument (CA) too much credit, and gives himself too little credit. In his book, The Metaphysics of Free Will, Fischer gave the CA as good a statement as it will ever get, and put his finger on what is wrong with it. Then he declared stalemate rather than victory. In my (...)
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  44.  9
    Massimo Marassi (1998). Ernesto Grassi Y el problema de la metáfora en el de nostri temporis S t udiorum ratione. Cuadernos Sobre Vico 9:10.
    Exposición crítica de la evolución de la trayectoria viquiana de E. Grassi al hilo del problema fundamental de la metáfora, cuyo valor ontológico reivindicó. Grassi se interesó por este problema desde su juventud cuando, como discípulo heideggeriano que busca alternativas a la Seinsvergessenheit, estudió la epistemología tópica del De nostri. Pero sólo en la madurez extendió su interés metafórico a la entera obra viquiana, justo al concebir plenamente la filosofía como retórica.Critical exposition of E. Grassi’s Vichian trajectory through the fundamental (...)
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  45. Bradley Monton (2011). Mixed Strategies Can't Evade Pascal's Wager. Analysis 71 (4):642-645.
    I defend Pascal's Wager from a particular way of evading it, the mixed strategy approach. The mixed strategies approach suggests that Pascal's Wager does not obligate one to believe in God, because one can get the same infinite expected utility from other strategies besides the strategy of believing in God. I will show that while there's nothing technically wrong with the mixed strategy approach, rationality requires it to be applied in such a way that Pascal's Wager doesn't lose any force.
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  46.  17
    T. K. Abbott (1889). Bishop Wordsworth's Edition of the Vulgate Nouum Testamentum Domini Nostri Iesu Christi Latine. Secundum Editionem Sancti Hieronymi Ad Codicum Manuscriptorum Fidem Recensuit Johannes Wordsworth, S.T.P., Episcopus Sarisburiensis, in Operis Societatem Adsumto Henrico Iuliano White, A. M. Societatis S. Andreae, Collegii Theologici Sarisburiensis Uice-Principali. Partis Prioris Fasciculus Primus Euangelium Secundum Matthaeum. Oxonii E Typographeo Clarendoniano. MDCCCLXXXIX. 12s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 3 (10):452-454.
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  47.  7
    T. Nicklin (1912). The Earliest Cosmogonies. By W. F. Warren, S.T.D., LL.D. 1 Vol. Pp. 222. 7 Diagrams. New York: Eaton and Mains; Cincinnati: Jennings and Graham. Copyright 1909. $1.50 Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 26 (08):270-.
  48. Cheung Chan-fai (1998). T'ang Chün-I's Philosophy of Love. Philosophy East and West 48 (2):257-271.
    T'ang Chün-i's early work Ai-ching chih fu-yin (Gospel of love) has been much neglected by T'ang scholars. This essay argues that this text is not a caprice, and that it marks an important stage in T'ang's life and studies. Furthermore, in the history of Chinese philosophy, it is probably the first book ever written on the philosophy of love.
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  49. David Papineau (2003). Why You Don’T Want to Get in the Box with Schrödinger's Cat. Analysis 63 (277):51–58.
    By way of an example, Lewis imagines your being invited to join Schrödinger’s cat in its box for an hour. This box will either fill up with deadly poison fumes or not, depending on whether or not some radioactive atom decays, the probability of decay within an hour being 50%. The invitation is accompanied with some further incentive to comply (Lewis sets it up so there is a significant chance of some pretty bad but not life-threatening punishment if you don’t (...)
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  50. Trevor Levere (1978). S. T. Coleridge: A Poet's View of Science. Annals of Science 35 (1):33-44.
    This paper is concerned with Coleridge's view of science as at once a branch of knowledge and a creative activity, mediating between man and nature, and thereby complementing poetry. Coleridge was well-informed about contemporary science. He stressed the symbolic status of scientific language, the role of scientific genius, and the need in science to rely upon reason rather than the unqualified senses. Kepler and, more recently, John Hunter and Humphry Davy provided his favorite instances of scientific genius, while chemistry—Davy's not (...)
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