Search results for 'S. Ueda' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. S. Ueda (1995). Silence and Words in Zen Buddhism. Diogenes 43 (170):1-21.score: 240.0
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  2. Robert E. Carter (2009). God and Nothingness. Philosophy East and West 59 (1):pp. 1-21.score: 24.0
    The idea of nothingness has been viewed as neither a vital nor a positive element in Western philosophy or theology. With the exception of a handful of mystics, nothingness has been taken to refer to the negation of being, or to some theoretical void. By contrast, the Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitarō gave nothingness a central role in philosophy. The strategy of this essay is to use the German mystic Meister Eckhart as a more familiar thinker who did take nothingness seriously, (...)
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  3. Susan L. Burns (2003). Before the Nation: Kokugaku and the Imagining of Community in Early Modern Japan. Duke University Press.score: 24.0
    Late Tokugawa society and the crisis of community -- Before the Kojikiden : the divine age narrative in Tokugawa Japan -- Motoori Norinaga : discovering Japan -- Ueda Akinari : history and community -- Fujitani Mitsue : the poetics off community -- Tachibana Moribe : cosmology and community -- National literature, intellectual history, and the new Kokugaku -- Conclusion : imagined Japan(s).
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  4. Bret W. Davis (2014). Conversing in Emptiness: Rethinking Cross-Cultural Dialogue with the Kyoto School. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:171-194.score: 24.0
    As we attempt to engender a dialogue between different philosophical traditions, one of the first of the topics which need to be addressed is that of the very nature of dialogue. In other words, we need to engage in a dialogue about dialogue. Toward that end, this essay attempts to rethink the nature of dialogue from the perspective of two key members of the Kyoto School, namely its founder, Nishida Kitar1945), and its current central figure, Ueda Shizuteru (b. 1926). (...)
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