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  1. Sarah Klitenic Wear (2012). The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity. Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):231-235.
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  2. S. Klitenic Wear (2011). The One in Syrianus Teachings on the Parmenides: Syrianus on Parm., 137d and 139a1. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (1):58-84.
    This article describes Syrianus' teachings on the One, as found in his testimonia on the Parmenides . In order to preserve the transcendence of the One, while still providing a fluid universe connected to the One, Syrianus shows how the nature of the One is seen in the structure of the Parmenides itself: the first hypothesis of the Parmenides outlines the primal God, while the intelligible universe is the subject of the second hypothesis, in so far as the intelligible universe (...)
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  3. S. Klitenic Wear (2011). The One in Syrianus' Teachings on the Parmenides_: Syrianus on _Parm., 137d and 139a1. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (1):58-84.
  4. Sarah Klitenic Wear (2011). The Teachings of Syrianus on Plato's Timaeus and Parmenides. Brill.
    This books delves into the major tenets of Syrianus' philosophical teachings on the Timaeus and Parmenides based on the testimonia of Proclus, as found in Proclus' commentaries on Plato's Timaeus and Parmenides, and Damascius, as reported ...
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  5. Stephen Wear (2011). Sense and Nonsense in the Conservative Critique of Obamacare. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):17-20.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 12, Page 17-20, December 2011.
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  6. Sarah Klitenic Wear (2008). Syrianus the Platonist on Eternity and Time. Classical Quarterly 58 (02):648-.
  7. H. H. Chiang, Z. Y. Lu & S. E. Wear (2004). To Have or to Be: Ways of Caregiving Discovered During Recovery From the Earthquake Disaster in Taiwan. Journal of Medical Ethics 31:154-158.
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  8. J. Freer & S. Wear (2002). Culture Wars in New York State: Ongoing Political Resistance by Religious Groups to the Family Health Care Decisions Act. Christian Bioethics 8 (1):9-24.
  9. Stephen Wear (2002). Teaching Bioethics at (or Near) the Bedside. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (4):433 – 445.
    Many teachers of bioethics often express concern, in their writings and otherwise, about the theoretical basis (or lack of it) of bioethics and the allied issue of relativism. The companion articles by Tong and Momeyer are in this vein and rightly address such issues within the context of a liberal arts education. This article addresses such issues in a different venue, i.e., bioethics teaching in the clinical sphere of health care institutions. It presumes to suggest that many of these theoretical (...)
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  10. Larry Torcello & Stephen Wear (2000). The Commercialization of Human Body Parts: A Reappraisal From a Protestant Perspective. Christian Bioethics 6 (2):153-169.
    The idea of a market in human organs has traditionally met with widespread and emphatic rejection from both secular and religious fronts alike. However, as numerous human beings continue to suffer an uncertain fate on transplant waiting lists, voices are beginning to emerge that are willing at least to explore the option of human organ sales. Anyone who argues for such an option must contend, however, with what seem to be largely emotional rejections of the idea. Often it seems that (...)
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  11. Lawrence Torcello & Stephen Wear (2000). The Commercialization of Human Body Parts: A Reappraisal From a Protestant Perspective. Christian Bioethics 6 (2):153-169.
    The idea of a market in human organs has traditionally met with widespread and emphatic rejection from both secular and religious fronts alike. However, as numerous human beings continue to suffer an uncertain fate on transplant waiting lists, voices are beginning to emerge that are willing at least to explore the option of human organ sales. Anyone who argues for such an option must contend, however, with what seem to be largely emotional rejections of the idea. Often it seems that (...)
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  12. Stephen Wear (1999). Enhancing Clinician Provision of Informed Consent and Counseling: Some Pedagogical Strategies. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (1):34 – 42.
    Although long touted as an ethical and legal requirement, some clinicians still seem to offer less than fully adequate informed consent processes; similarly the counseling of patients and families, particularly about post-intervention scenarios, is often perfunctory at best. Keyed to a narrative of a patient's experience with surgery for a deviated septum, this article reflects on why such less than adequate clinician behaviors tend to occur and what might be done about them. Certain legal misconceptions about informed consent are highlighted (...)
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  13. Stephen E. Wear, William H. Coles, Anthony H. Szczygiel, Adrianne McEvoy & Carl C. Pegels (1998). Patenting Medical and Surgical Techniques: An Ethical-Legal Analysis. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (1):75 – 97.
    Considerable controversy has recently arisen regarding the patenting of medical and surgical processes in the United States. One such patent, viz. for a "chevron" incision used in ophthalmologic surgery, has especially occasioned heated response including a major, condemnatory ethics policy statement from the American Medical Association as well as federal legislation denying patent protection for most uses of a patented medical or surgical procedure. This article identifies and discusses the major legal, ethical and public policy considerations offered by proponents and (...)
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  14. C. Jack & S. Wear (1997). Kurt Bayertz: 1994 (Xx + 342 Pp.), GenEthics: Technological Intervention in Human Reproduction as a Philosophical Problem Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (2):199-210.
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  15. Charles Jack & Stephen Wear (1997). GenEthics: Technological Intervention in Human Reproduction as a Philosophical Problem, by Kurt Bayertz, Cambridge University Press; 1994. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (2):199.
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  16. S. Wear & B. Phillips (1996). Clinical Ethics and the Suffering Christian. Christian Bioethics 2 (2):239-252.
    Contrary to the ecumenical spirit of our time, the differences among the Christian religions bring into question what one can say or do in common with fellow Christians. This issue, echoing the program of this journal, accentuates those differences, specifically when we focus on the Christian who is ill and suffering. At the bedside, it is the specifics of a religion, including not only its doctrines, but its informing and sustaining narratives, that must particularly be brought into play for the (...)
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  17. Stephen E. Wear & Charles Jack (1996). The Relevance for Hecs of H.T. Engelhardt'sthe Foundations of Bioethics. HEC Forum 8 (1):2-11.
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  18. Stephen Wear & Andrew Crowden (1996). Informed Consent: Patient Autonomy and Physician Beneficience Within Clinical Medicine. Bioethics-Oxford 10 (1):83-86.
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  19. G. Logue & S. Wear (1995). A Desperate Solution: Individual Autonomy and the Double-Blind Controlled Experiment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (1):57-64.
    The randomization ingredient in double-blind controlled experiments may be objectionable to patients who, in their desperation, come to such trials seeking a last chance of cure. Minogue et al., who view such a situation as inherently exploitive and undermining of patient autonomy, propose that such “desperate volunteers” instead be enrolled in the active arm, while other patients, less desperate and more committed to medical progress, continue to be randomized. Their view is critiqued as destructive of medical progress, inappropriate in its (...)
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  20. S. Wear & G. Logue (1995). The Problem of Medically Futile Treatment: Falling Back on a Preventive Ethics Approach. Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (2):138.
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  21. Stephen Wear (1995). A Desperate Solution: Individual Autonomy and the Double-Blind Controlled Experiment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (1):57-64.
    The randomization ingredient in double-blind controlled experiments may be objectionable to patients who, in their desperation, come to such trials seeking a last chance of cure. Minogue et al. , who view such a situation as inherently exploitive and undermining of patient autonomy, propose that such "desperate volunteers" instead be enrolled in the active arm, while other patients, less desperate and more committed to medical progress, continue to be randomized. Their view is critiqued as destructive of medical progress, inappropriate in (...)
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  22. S. Wear, S. Lagaipa & G. Logue (1994). Toleration of Moral Diversity and the Conscientious Refusal by Physicians to Withdraw Life-Sustaining Treatment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (2):147-159.
    The removal of life-sustaining treatment often brings physicians into conflict with patients. Because of their moral beliefs physicians often respond slowly to the request of patients or their families. People in bioethics have been quick to recommend that in cases of conflict the physician should simply sign off the case and “step aside”. This is not easily done psychologically or morally. Such a resolution also masks a number of more subtle, quite trouble some problems that conflict with the commitment to (...)
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  23. Stephen Wear & Jonathan D. Moreno (1994). Informed Consent: Patient Autonomy and Physician Beneficence Within Clinical Medicine. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 6 (5):323-325.
    Substantial efforts have recently been made to reform the physician-patient relationship, particularly toward replacing the `silent world of doctor and patient' with informed patient participation in medical decision-making. This 'new ethos of patient autonomy' has especially insisted on the routine provision of informed consent for all medical interventions. Stronly supported by most bioethicists and the law, as well as more popular writings and expectations, it still seems clear that informed consent has, at best, been received in a lukewarm fashion by (...)
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  24. Stephen Wear (1991). The Irreducibly Clinical Character of Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (1):53-70.
    Current bioethics scholarship and pedagogy suffers from an insufficient correlation with the realities and variables of clinical medicine, particularly in its dominant paradigm of patient autonomy. Reference to various basic clinical factors will be made here toward proposing certain conceptual, tactical and pedagogical modifications to this paradigm. Keywords: clinical reality, informed consent, paternalism, patient autonomy, physician beneficence CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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  25. Stephen Wear (1991). The Moral Significance of Institutional Integrity. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (2):225-230.
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  26. Stephen Wear, Paul Katz, Barbara Andrzejewski & Tirtadharyana Haryadi (1990). The Development of an Ethics Consultation Service. HEC Forum 2 (2):75-87.
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  27. S. Wear (1987). Earl E. Shelp, Born to Die? Deciding the Fate of Critically Ill Newborns, The Free Press, New York, 1986, 250 Pp., Hardcover, U.S. $19.95. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (3):297-304.
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  28. Stephen Wear (1983). Patient Autonomy, Paternalism, and the Conscientious Physician. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 4 (3).
    This paper concerns itself with the concept of diminished competence with particular regard to the problems and options that mentally compromised patients raise for medical management. It proceeds through three general stages: (1) a restatement of the sense and grounds of the new patients' rights ethos which the existence of such patients calls into question; (2) a consideration of what expanded responsibilities and tactics physicians should embrace to protect and enhance such patients' autonomy; and (3) the standards, criteria, and mechanisms (...)
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  29. Stephen Wear (1981). Nuancing the Healer's Art — the Epistemology of Patient Competence. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):27-30.
    The programmatic thrust of Thomasma and Pellegrino [5] is clarified and underscored and is interpreted as an attempt to introduce a fixed point into the ethical dimension of medicine by specifying some regulative principles for the medical profession. Two important features of this type of enterprise are noted: on the one hand, it may lead the profession to distinguish between technically identical actions on the basis of the normative principles it produces, thus excluding some morally permissible actions as duties constitutive (...)
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  30. Stephen Wear (1980). Mental Illness and Moral Status. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (4):292-312.