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  1. Sabine Maasen (2007). Selves in Turmoil - Neurocognitive and Societal Challenges of the Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (1-2):252-270.
    As the cognitive neurosciences set out to challenge our understanding of consciousness, the existing conceptual panoply of meanings attached to the term remains largely unaccounted for. By way of bibliometric analysis, the following study first reveals the breadth and shift of meanings over the last decades, the main tendency being a more 'brainy' concept of consciousness. On this basis, the emergence of consciousness studies is regarded as a 'trading zone' (Galison) in which experimental, philosophical and experiential accounts are dialectically engaged. (...)
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  2. Sabine Maasen (2007). Selves in Turmoil. In J. Scott Jordan & Dawn M. McBride (eds.), The Concepts of Consciousness: Integrating an Emerging Science. Imprint Academic. 252-270.
  3. Sabine Maasen & Barbara Sutter (2007). Introduction : Reviving a Sociology of Willing Selves. In Sabine Maasen & Barbara Sutter (eds.), On Willing Selves: Neoliberal Politics Vis-à-Vis the Neuroscientific Challenge. Plagrave Macmiilan.
     
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  4. Sabine Maasen & Barbara Sutter (eds.) (2007). On Willing Selves: Neoliberal Politics Vis-À-Vis the Neuroscientific Challenge. Plagrave Macmiilan.
    Currently, the neurosciences challenge the concept of will to be scientifically untenable, specifying that it is our brain rather than our "self" that decides what we want to do. At the same time, we seem to be confronted with increasing possibilities and necessities of free choice in all areas of social life. Based on up-to-date (empirical) research in the social sciences and philosophy, the authors convened in this book address this seeming contradiction: By differentiating the physical, the psychic, and the (...)
     
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  5. Sabine Maasen, Barbara Sutter & Stefanie Duttweiler (2007). Self, Past and Present. In Sabine Maasen & Barbara Sutter (eds.), On Willing Selves: Neoliberal Politics Vis-?-Vis the Neuroscientific Challenge. Plagrave Macmiilan.
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  6. Sabine Maasen, Barbara Sutter & Stefanie Duttweiler (2007). Self-Help : The Making of Neoscocial Selves in Neoliberal Society. In Sabine Maasen & Barbara Sutter (eds.), On Willing Selves: Neoliberal Politics Vis-à-Vis the Neuroscientific Challenge. Plagrave Macmiilan. 25--52.
     
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  7. Sabine Maasen (2006). Neurosociety Ahead? Debating Free Will in the Media. In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. 339-359.
  8. Sabine Maasen & Peter Weingart (eds.) (2005/2008). Democratization of Expertise?: Exploring Novel Forms of Scientific Advice in Political Decision-Making. Springer.
  9. Sabine Maasen (2003). A View From Elsewhere: The Emergence of Consciousness in Multidisciplinary Discourse. In Sabine Maasen, Wolfgang Prinz & Gerhard Roth (eds.), Voluntary Action: Brains, Minds, and Sociality. Oxford University Press. 323-359.
     
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  10. Sabine Maasen, Wolfgang Prinz & Gerhard Roth (eds.) (2003). Voluntary Action: Brains, Minds, and Sociality. Oxford University Press.
    We all know what a voluntary action is - we all think we know when an action is voluntary, and when it is not. Yet, performing and action and defining it are different matters. What counts as an action? When does it begin? Does the conscious desire to perform an action always precede the act? If not, is it really a voluntary action? This is a debate that crosses the boundaries of Philosophy, Neuroscience, Psychology, and Social Science. This book brings (...)
     
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  11. Sabine Maasen (2000). Metaphors and the Dynamics of Knowledge. Routledge.
    This book opens up a new route to the study of knowledge dynamics and the sociology of knowledge. The focus is on the role of metaphors as powerful catalysts and the book dissects their role in the construction of theories of knowledge and will therefore be of vital interest to social and cognitive scientists alike.
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