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  1. Samantha Ashenden (2014). On Violence in Habermas's Philosophy of Language. European Journal of Political Theory 13 (4):427-452.
    Habermas does not rule out the possibility of violence in language. In fact his account explicitly licenses a broad conception of violence as ‘systematically distorted communication’. Yet he does rule out the possibility that language simultaneously imposes as it discloses. That is, his argument precludes the possibility of recognizing that there is an antinomy at the heart of language and philosophical reason. This occlusion of the simultaneously world-disclosing and world-imposing character of language feeds and sustains Habermas’s legal and political arguments, (...)
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  2. Samantha Ashenden (2004). Structuralism and Post-Structuralism. In Austin Harrington (ed.), Modern Social Theory: An Introduction. OUP Oxford
  3. Samantha Ashenden (2002). Policing Perversion: The Contemporary Governance of Paedophilia. Journal for Cultural Research 6 (1-2):197-222.
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  4. Samantha Ashenden (1999). Questions of Criticism. In Samantha Ashenden & David Owen (eds.), Foucault Contra Habermas: Recasting the Dialogue Between Genealogy and Critical Theory. Sage 143.
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  5. Samantha Ashenden & David Owen (eds.) (1999). Foucault Contra Habermas: Recasting the Dialogue Between Genealogy and Critical Theory. Sage.
  6. Samantha Ashenden (1998). Pluralism Within the Limits of Reason Alone? Habermas and the Discursive Negotiation of Consensus. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 1 (3):117-136.