Search results for 'Same-sex marriage' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Brian Barry (2011). Same-Sex Marriage and the Charge of Illiberality. Social Theory and Practice 37 (2):333-357.
    However liberalism is best understood, liberals typically seek to defend a wide range of liberty. Since same-sex marriage [henceforth: SSM] prohibitions limit the liberty of citizens, there is at least some reason to suppose that they are inconsistent with liberal commitments. But some have argued that it is the recognition of SSM—not its prohibition—that conflicts with liberalism’s commitments. I refer to the thesis that recognition of SSM is illiberal as “The Charge.” As a sympathetic liberal, I take The (...)
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  2. Peter Brian Barry, The Liberal Case Against Same-Sex Marriage Prohibitions.
    Experience clearly suggests that most legal philosophers and ethicists are not surprised to be told that liberal states cannot permissibly prohibit same-sex marriage (henceforth: SSM). It is somewhat less clear just what the appropriate liberal strategy is and should be in defense of this thesis. Rather than try to defend SSM directly, I shall proceed indirectly by arguing that SSM prohibitions are indefensible on liberal grounds. Initially, I shall consider what I take to be the most powerful liberal (...)
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  3. Reginald Williams (2011). Same-Sex Marriage and Equality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (5):589-595.
    Some argue that same-sex marriage is not an equal rights issue because, where same-sex marriage is illegal, heterosexuals and homosexuals have the exact same right to marry—i.e., the right to marry one adult of the opposite sex. I dispute this argument by pointing out that while societies that prohibit same-sex marriage equally permit individual heterosexuals and homosexuals to marry one adult of the opposite sex, same-sex couples in such societies are denied an important (...)
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  4.  40
    Erik A. Anderson (2013). A Defense of the 'Sterility Objection' to the New Natural Lawyers' Argument Against Same-Sex Marriage. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (4):759-775.
    The “new natural lawyers” (NNLs) are a prolific group of philosophers, theologians, and political theorists that includes John Finnis, Robert George, Patrick Lee, Gerard Bradley, and Germain Grisez, among others. These thinkers have devoted themselves to developing and defending a traditional sexual ethic according to which homosexual sexual acts are immoral per se and marriage ought to remain an exclusively heterosexual institution. The sterility objection holds that the NNLs are guilty of making an arbitrary and irrational distinction between (...) couples and sterile heterosexual couples. The NNLs believe that it is a necessary condition for two people’s being morally and legally entitled to get married that they be able to perform sexual acts that are “suited to procreating.” But sterile heterosexual couples are incapable of performing such acts. Therefore, it should follow from the NNLs’ own premises that sterile heterosexual couples are not entitled to marry. But the NNLs do not draw this conclusion. Instead, they maintain that sterile heterosexuals can marry while denying that the same is true of same-sex couples. The sterility objection claims the NNLs are being inconsistent in treating the two kinds of couples differently. Although the sterility objection has been endorsed by recent critics, I don’t think it has yet been adequately defended. The NNLs have responded by arguing that there is a sense in which the sex acts of sterile heterosexual couples are as suited to reproduction as those of fertile heterosexuals. Thus they maintain that the distinction they draw between the two kinds of couple has a rational basis. A successful defense of the sterility objection must show that this response on the part of the NNLs fails. Such is the task I undertake in this paper. I argue that the NNLs’ response fails because acts of penile-vaginal intercourse between sterile heterosexuals lack the actual causal power to produce conception that sexual acts need to be considered truly reproductive, and because their assumption that penile-vaginal intercourse always functions reproductively is bad biology. (shrink)
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  5. Alex Rajczi (2008). A Populist Argument for Same-Sex Marriage. The Monist 91 (3-4):475-505.
    The paper argues that same-sex marriage ought to be legalized. The argument is ecumenical and appeals only to basic principles of liberal government. Specifically, the paper argues that if the government is offering an opportunity to one group, then it may not withhold the opportunity from another on the ground that the people receiving it are immoral or that their receipt of the opportunity would spread immoral messages. The only acceptable ground is that the group’s receipt would cause (...)
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  6. Timothy F. Murphy (2011). Same-Sex Marriage: Not a Threat to Marriage or Children. Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (3):288-304.
    Some critics of same-sex marriage allege that this kind of union not only betrays the nature of marriage but that it also opens children to various kinds of harm. Same-sex marriage is objectionable, on this view, in its nature and in its effects. A view of marriage as requiring an unassisted capacity to conceive children may be respect as one idea of marriage, but this view need not be understood as marriage itself. (...)
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  7.  30
    Matthew Lister (2015). Review of Corvino and Gallagher, Debating Same-Sex Marriage. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 9:752.
    With the recent U.S. Supreme Court cases finding the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional and removing impediments to same-sex marriage in California,as well as a number of recent successes in special elections and with legislators inthe U.S. and other countries, we might wonder whether there is still need for a book debating same-sex marriage. Is not the tide of history inevitably movingtowards marriage equality? While that position seems tempting, it is too quick.
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  8.  25
    Matthew Lister (2015). John Corvino and Maggie Gallagher: Debating Same-Sex Marriage. Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (4):727-735.
  9.  7
    Philip J. Kain (2015). Hegel, Recognition, and Same‐Sex Marriage. Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (2):226-241.
    To understand Hegel’s concept of Sittlichkeit (ethical life) and the role that love and marriage play in it, we must understand his concept of recognition. It is a mistake, however, to think as some do that mutual recognition between equals is sufficient for Sittlichkeit. Rather, for Hegel, the more significant and powerful the recognizer, the more real the recognized. Ultimately recognition must come from spirit (Geist). Understanding this will allow us to see, despite Hegel, that he can capture, better (...)
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  10.  7
    Alexa DeGagne (2012). Queer Bedfellows of Proposition 8: Adopting Social Conservative and Neoliberal Political Rationalities in California's Same-Sex Marriage Fight. Studies in Social Justice 7 (1):107-124.
    On November 4, 2008 California voters passed Proposition 8, and accordingly same-sex marriage was banned under the state constitution. Proposition 8 is now being considered by the Supreme Court. The proposition has sparked national debate about the nature of the relationship between the state and citizens’ sexuality and corresponding rights; calling into question the practice of allocating rights and privileges on the basis of sexuality and family form. Proponents of the proposition, who can be classified as predominantly socially (...)
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  11.  3
    Beth Goldblatt (2006). Case Note: Same-Sex Marriage in South Africa –the Constitutional Court's Judgment. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 14 (2):261-270.
    Late last year the Constitutional Court of South Africa decided that the exclusion of same-sex couples from the common law definition of marriage and the statutory marriage formula was unconstitutional as it violated the rights of such couples to equality. The Court suspended the declaration of invalidity for one year to allow Parliament to enact new legislation to correct the defects, failing which certain words would be read into the legislation to accommodate same-sex marriage. A (...)
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  12.  3
    Rosie Harding (2007). Sir Mark Potter And The Protection Of The Traditional Family: Why Same Sex Marriage Is (Still) A Feminist Issue. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 15 (2):223-234.
    In Wilkinson v. Kitzinger, the petitioner (Susan Wilkinson) sought a declaration of her marital status, following her marriage to Celia Kitzinger in British Columbia, Canada in August 2003. The High Court refused the application, finding that their valid Canadian marriage is, in United Kingdom law, a civil partnership. In this note, I focus on Sir Mark Potter’s adjudication of the human rights issues under Articles 8, 12 and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights (E.C.H.R.), highlighting his (...)
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  13.  21
    Francesco Bilotta (2013). Same-Sex Marriage: The Reasons to Support It. Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 26 (1):47-66.
  14.  4
    Rebecca Probert (2005). Same-Sex Couples and the Marriage Model. Feminist Legal Studies 13 (1):135-143.
  15. Matthew B. O'Brien (2012). Why Liberal Neutrality Prohibits Same-Sex Marriage: Rawls, Political Liberalism, and the Family. British Journal of American Legal Studies 1 (2):411-466.
    John Rawls’s political liberalism and its ideal of public reason are tremendously influential in contemporary political philosophy and in constitutional law as well. Many, perhaps even most, liberals are Rawlsians of one stripe or another. This is problematic, because most liberals also support the redefinition of civil marriage to include same-sex unions, and as I show, Rawls’s political liberalism actually prohibits same- sex marriage. Recently in Perry v. Schwarzenegger, however, California’s northern federal district court reinterpreted the traditional (...)
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  16. Matthew C. Altman (2010). Kant on Sex and Marriage: The Implications for the Same-Sex Marriage Debate. Kant-Studien 101 (3):309-330.
    When examined critically, Kant's views on sex and marriage give us the tools to defend same-sex marriage on moral grounds. The sexual objectification of one's partner can only be overcome when two people take responsibility for one another's overall well-being, and this commitment is enforced through legal coercion. Kant's views on the unnaturalness of homosexuality do not stand up to scrutiny, and he cannot (as he often tries to) restrict the purpose of sex to procreation. Kant himself (...)
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  17. Joan Callahan (2009). Same-Sex Marriage: Why It Matters—At Least for Now. Hypatia 24 (1):70 - 80.
    This paper addresses the progressive, feminist critique of same-sex marriage as articulated by Claudia Card. Although agreeing with Card that the institution of marriage as we know it is profoundly morally flawed in its origins and effects, Callahan disagrees with Card's suggestion that queer activists in the United States should not be working for the inclusion of same-sex couples in the institution.
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  18.  16
    James S. Spiegel (2016). Why Same-Sex Marriage is Unjust. Think 15 (43):81-90.
    Proponents of same-sex marriage often defend their view by appealing to the concept of justice. But a significant argument from justice against same-sex marriage can be made also, as follows. Heterosexual union has special social value because it is the indispensable means by which humans come into existence. What has special social value deserves special recognition and sanction. Civil ordinances that recognize same-sex marriage as comparable to heterosexual marriage constitute a rejection of the (...)
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  19. J. Aguirre (2013). Habermas' Account of the Role of Religion in the Public Sphere A Response to Cristina Lafont's Critiques Through an Illustrative Political Debate About Same-Sex Marriage. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (7):637-673.
    This article is meant as a response to Cristina Lafont’s critiques of Habermas’ view of religion’s role in the public sphere. For Lafont, the burdens that Habermas places on secular citizens, by requiring them to avoid secularism, may entail dangerous consequences for a correct understanding of the concept of deliberative democracy. For this reason, she presents a proposal of her own in which no citizen, whether religious or secular, has the obligation to engage in a way of thinking alien to (...)
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  20. Ralph Wedgwood (1999). The Fundamental Argument for Same-Sex Marriage. Journal of Political Philosophy 7 (3):225–242.
    This paper offers an argument in favour of the conclusion that it is seriously unjust to exclude same-sex couples from the institution of civil marriage. The argument is based on an interpretation of what the institution of marriage essentially is, and of its essential rationale; the crucial claim is that although marriage is a legal institution, it is also a social institution, involving a "social meaning" -- a body of common knowledge and expectations about marriage (...)
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  21.  43
    Lawrence Blum (2010). Secularism, Multiculturalism and Same-Sex Marriage: A Comment on Brenda Almond's 'Education for Tolerance'. Journal of Moral Education 39 (2):145-160.
    Although Almond argues that the contemporary West has lost touch with the value of tolerance, I argue that that value applied to those of different religions and sexual orientations is too minimal a standard for a pluralistic society. I suggest, in the spirit of the work of Charles Taylor and Tariq Modood, the more robust standard of respect and acceptance. In addition, I have criticised Almond?s privileging of parental values over school values, seeing in that privileging a failure to recognise (...)
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  22.  13
    Christopher Arroyo (2016). Is the Same‐Sex Marriage Debate Really Just About Marriage? Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2).
    In What is Marriage? One Man and One Woman: A Defense, Sherif Girgis, Ryan Anderson and Robert George defend the ‘conjugal marriage’ while claiming to make no moral judgments about homosexuality. My contention in this article is that the argument of What is Marriage is not sufficiently different from the arguments of classical new natural law theorists, and, therefore, What is Marriage does not remain neutral on the question of whether homosexuality is moral. First, I give (...)
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  23.  9
    Francis J. Beckwith (2013). Justificatory Liberalism and Same‐Sex Marriage. Ratio Juris 26 (4):487-509.
    Supporters of Justificatory Liberalism (JL)—such as John Rawls and Gerard Gaus—typically maintain that the state may not coerce its citizens on matters of constitutional essentials unless it can provide public justification that the coerced citizens would be irrational in rejecting. The state, in other words, may not coerce citizens whose rejection of the coercion is based on their reasonable comprehensive doctrines (i.e., worldviews). Proponents of the legal recognition of same-sex marriage (SSM) usually offer some version of JL as (...)
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  24.  61
    Christopher Arroyo (2011). Same-Sex Marriage, 'Homosexual Desire,' and the Capacity to Love. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):171-186.
    The issue of same-sex marriage continues to be controversial in the United States. Opponents of same-sex marriage offer a variety of objections in defense of their position. One such objection (which I identify as the Inability to Love objection, or ILO) is that legalizing same-sex marriage would promote a counterfeit good (homosexual marriage) as a genuine good (heterosexual marriage), since homosexuals are incapable of genuine, full erotic love. Proponents of ILO argue that (...)
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  25.  10
    Joseph Sartorelli (2015). Being Fair to the Fairness Argument for Same-Sex Marriage. Think 14 (41):73-80.
    According to the fairness argument, same-sex marriage must be permitted because without it there would not be equal treatment for homosexuals and heterosexuals. In, Piers Benn holds that the argument does eventually deliver this conclusion, but not as readily as intuitively appears. He concludes that some conservative points against same-sex marriage achieve at least a stand-off from the point of view of the argument. I argue that he accords the conservative points much more significance than they (...)
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  26.  44
    Margaret Somerville (2012). Volume 24 Issue 2 - The Case Against "Same-Sex Marriage". Bioethics Research Notes 24 (2):23.
    Somerville, Margaret Same-sex marriage creates a clash between upholding the human rights of children with respect to their coming-into being and the family structure in which they will be reared, and the claims of homosexual adults who wish to marry a same-sex partner. It forces us, as a society, to choose whether to give priority to children's rights or to homosexual adults' claims. This problem does not arise with opposite-sex marriage, because children's rights and adult's claims (...)
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  27.  11
    Avrum Stroll (2009). A Defense of Same-Sex Marriage. Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (4):343-355.
    In reply to Jeremy Garrett's criticism of my paper in the July 2009 issue of Public Affairs Quarterly, I, first, clarify my view of the proper status of same-sex marriage in a liberal society. I, second, defend my claim that moral disapprobation of homosexuality may be a legitimate, nondiscriminatory reason for denying same-sex couples the benefits and protections of the marriage license. Finally, I criticize the view that, as long as marriage is viewed as a (...)
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  28.  44
    Loren Cannon (2009). Trans-Marriage and the Unacceptability of Same-Sex Marriage Restrictions. Social Philosophy Today 25:75-89.
    This essay analyzes the coherency and reasonableness of legal restrictions against same-sex marriage. The population of focus is transgender individuals and their partners. Focusing on trans-marriage makes clear that the restriction of marriage to one man and one woman is misguided in that the law rests on the assumption that the categories of sex and gender comprise two disjoint, exhaustive, and unambiguous groupings. The primary argument here is not that the restrictions of same-sex marriage (...)
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  29.  31
    Christopher J. Collins (2009). Family Values and Same-Sex Marriage. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (1):55-65.
    Alain Locke, an often neglected classical American Pragmatist, developed a pluralistic value theory as an antidote to the "value absolutism" he considered the root cause of social conflict. Values, for Locke, are not immutable features of a transcendent reality, but rather emerge from human functional attitudes, or what he calls "feeling-modes." However incommensurable the contextualized values of diverse cultures may appear, they can always be traced back to common modes of valuing. Recognizing the common character of our human faculty of (...)
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  30.  45
    Andrew Stivers & Andrew Valls (2007). Same-Sex Marriage and the Regulation of Language. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 6 (2):237-253.
    Oregon State University, USA, andrew.valls{at}oregonstate.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> In this article, we draw an analogy between the regulation of market language (including official definitions of `organic', `ice cream', and `diamond') and the regulation of the social and legal label `marriage'. Many of the issues raised in the debate over same-sex marriage are less about access to material benefits than about the social and cultural meaning of `marriage'. After reviewing the (...)
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  31.  31
    Scott Woodcock (2009). Five Reasons Why Margaret Somerville is Wrong About Same-Sex Marriage and the Rights of Children. Dialogue 48 (4):867.
    ABSTRACT: In written work and a lecture at the 2008 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences that was co-sponsored by the Canadian Philosophical Association, Margaret Somerville has claimed that allowing same-sex marriage is unethical because doing so violates the inherently procreative function of marriage and thereby undermines the rights and duties that exist between children and their biological parents. In my paper, I offer five reasons for thinking that Somerville’s argument for this conclusion is unpersuasive. In (...)
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  32.  28
    Jim Vernon (2009). Free Love: A Hegelian Defense of Same-Sex Marriage Rights. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (1):69-89.
    By revisiting Hegel’s Philosophy of Right, I mount a Hegelian defense of same-sex marriage rights. I first argue that Hegel’s account of theIdea of freedom articulates both the necessity of popular shifts in the determinations of the institutions of right, as well as the duty to struggle to progressively actualize freedom through them. I then contend that Hegel, by grounding marriage in free consent, clears the path for expanding this ethical institution to include all monogamous couples. Lastly, (...)
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  33.  5
    Laura Reidel (2009). Religious Opposition to Same-Sex Marriage in Canada: Limits to Multiculturalism. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (2):261-281.
    The case of the opposition to legalizing same-sex marriage in Canada is an example of the limits of what will and will not be tolerated in the name of multiculturalism. This case offers an interesting perspective on the topic of multiculturalism, because it deals with a conflict between those seeking to expand human rights and those seeking to prevent such expansion because of their adherence to a particular set of cultural and religious beliefs. Despite Canada’s commitment to recognizing (...)
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  34.  3
    Michael Hand (2013). Framing Classroom Discussion of Same‐Sex Marriage. Educational Theory 63 (5):497-510.
    Assuming that the issue of same-sex marriage should be discussed in schools, how should the discussion be framed? Michael Hand first distinguishes this question from the related but distinct question of whether discussion on this topic should be steered. He then examines three possible frames for discussion of same-sex marriage: the perfectionist frame, the antiperfectionist frame, and the practical accommodation frame. He defends the perfectionist frame over the two alternatives: the purpose of state involvement in (...) is to promote valuable forms of intimate relationship, so the case for enabling same-sex couples to marry turns on the ethical claim that same-sex and opposite-sex intimate relationships are similarly valuable. Interrogation of this ethical claim must be central to classroom discussion of same-sex marriage. (shrink)
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  35.  5
    David Gilboa (2009). Same-Sex Marriage in a Liberal Democracy: Between Rejection and Recognition. Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (3):245-260.
    In the current debate about same-sex marriage, the great majority of writers belong to one of two camps: either completely in favor of same-sex marriage or completely against it. No effort is typically made to treat different dimensions of the problem differently. My approach, however, is to distinguish between two dimensions of the problem—between the right to marry a person of the same sex on the one hand, and the right to obtain public recognition of such (...)
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  36.  8
    John Corvino & Maggie Gallagher (2012). Debating Same-Sex Marriage. OUP Usa.
    Polls and election results show Americans sharply divided on same-sex marriage, and the controversy is unlikely to subside anytime soon. Debating Same-Sex Marriage provides an indispensable roadmap to the ongoing debate.
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  37. Mariano Croce (2015). Quod Non Est in Actis Non Est in Mundo: Legal Words, Unspeakability and the Same-Sex Marriage Issue. Law and Critique 26 (1):65-81.
    This article centres on the legal recognition of same-sex marriage with a view to exploring the issue of unspeakability; that is, the condition whereby some questions cannot be articulated because of a lack of words. More specifically, the article will explore what happens to those social practices that are not given legal speakability and thereby legal recognition/protection. To this end, I first focus on how words are produced in the sphere of everyday life and their dependence on the (...)
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  38. Ronald C. Den Otter (ed.) (2016). Beyond Same-Sex Marriage: Perspectives on Marital Possibilities. Lexington Books.
    Although the Supreme Court ruling ended a legal challenge to same-sex marriage, the debate continues and no one seems to know what lies on the horizon. This edited volume contributes to the growing literature on post-marriage-equality marriage. This book is the first interdisciplinary approach to understanding the various historical, empirical, normative, and legal dimensions of marriage as Americans begin to imagine what marriage could be like in the future.
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  39. Ahmed Khanani, Genaro Lozano, Nancy Nicol, David Rayside, Jean C. Robinson, Laura Saldivia & Miriam Smith (2010). Same-Sex Marriage in the Americas: Policy Innovation for Same-Sex Relationships. Lexington Books.
    This book explores policy innovation for same-sex couples throughout the Americas and includes same-sex marriage legislation, civil unions, and other new developments for same-sex couples throughout the Americas at both national and sub-national levels. This scholarship is innovative because though much has been written regarding developments in North America, there is very little work dealing with recent developments in the rest of the Americas.
     
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  40. Jason Pierceson, Adriana Piatti-Crocker & Shawn Schulenberg (eds.) (2010). Same-Sex Marriage in the Americas: Policy Innovation for Same-Sex Relationships. Lexington Books.
    This book explores policy innovation for same-sex couples throughout the Americas and includes same-sex marriage legislation, civil unions, and other new developments for same-sex couples throughout the Americas at both national and sub-national levels. This scholarship is innovative because though much has been written regarding developments in North America, there is very little work dealing with recent developments in the rest of the Americas.
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  41. Louise Richardson-Self (2015). Justifying Same-Sex Marriage: A Philosophical Investigation. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This book provides a philosophical examination of the extent to which legalizing same-sex marriage can contribute to ending the discrimination and social stigma faced by LGBT men and women in the Western world.
     
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  42. Rina Villars (forthcoming). Same-Sex Marriage and the Spanish Constitution: The Linguistic-Legal Meaning Interface. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-28.
    This paper analyzes the implications that the linguistic formulation of the marriage provision of the Spanish Constitution of 1978 had for securing the passage in 2005 of Law 13/2005, which legalized same-sex marriage. By claiming that a semantic omission in the original legal text was a marker of distributiveness, SSM supporters aimed to avoid a constitutional amendment, and succeeded in doing so. This linguistic argument, based on implicitness, was instrumental as a subsidiary argument of political moral argumentation. (...)
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  43.  5
    Isaac West (2015). Analogizing Interracial and Same-Sex Marriage. Philosophy and Rhetoric 48 (4):561-582.
    Midway between the unintelligible and the commonplace, it is metaphor which most produces knowledge. In the struggle for the recognition of gay and lesbian marriage equality in the United States, advocates often employ arguments analogizing the prohibitions against same-sex civil marriages as equally invalid as those that forbid legally interracial marriages.1 Whether it be in legal briefs, oral arguments, media appearances, or everyday conversations, more often than not, the legitimacy of gay and lesbian claims to equal protection before (...)
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  44.  26
    Vaughn Bryan Baltzly (2012). Same-Sex Marriage, Polygamy, and Disestablishment. Social Theory and Practice 38 (2):333-362.
    The Progressive favors extending the legal institution of marriage so as to include same-sex unions along with heterosexual ones. The Traditionalist opposes such an extension, preferring to retain the legal institution of marriage in its present form. I argue that the Progressive ought to broaden her position, endorsing instead the Liberal case for extending the current institution so as to include polygamous unions as well—for any consideration favoring Progressivism over Traditionalism likewise favors Liberalism over Progressivism. Progressives inclined (...)
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  45.  42
    Andrew F. March (2010). What Lies Beyond Same-Sex Marriage? Marriage, Reproductive Freedom and Future Persons in Liberal Public Justification. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (1):39-58.
    In this article I consider whether the legalization of sex-same marriage implies a right to incestuous marriage. I begin by suggesting that the liberal state get out of the 'marriage' business by leveling down to a universal civil union status. The question is then whether incestuous unions should be both legal and eligible for this status. I argue that the arguments compatible with public reason for prohibiting them outright, or even for excluding them from the permissible types (...)
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  46.  11
    Jeffrey Stout (2003). How Charity Transcends the Culture Wars: Eugene Rogers and Others on Same-Sex Marriage. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (2):169 - 180.
    In 1994 the "Ramsey Colloquium," under the leadership of Richard John Neuhaus, posed a challenge to what it called the "homosexual movement" within the Christian Church. The challenge was to prove that it had reasons distinguishable from secular liberalism--reasons consistent with orthodox Christian theology--in favor of same-sex coupling. Eugene Rogers's book, "Sexuality and the Christian Body: Their Way into the Triune God, can be read as a response to this challenge. The book is important not only for the content (...)
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  47.  1
    Anthony Fisher (2016). Same-Sex 'Marriage': Evolution or Deconstruction of Marriage and the Family? Australasian Catholic Record, The 93 (2):145.
    Fisher, Anthony The campaign to redefine marriage has recently gained such momentum- with now three and soon four Bills before the Commonwealth Parliament-that many think it is inevitable; this can leave those with misgivings feeling that they are already losers in a done deal. Some think it's the inexorable progress of liberty and equality-which leaves the doubters 'on the wrong side of history'. In this context supporters of classical marriage are presumed to have no real arguments to offer. (...)
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  48.  14
    Claire Young & Susan Boyd (2006). Losing the Feminist Voice? Debates on The Legal Recognition of Same Sex Partnerships in Canada. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (2):213-240.
    Over the last decade, legal recognition of same-sex relationships in Canada has accelerated. By and large, same-sex cohabitants are now recognised in the same manner as opposite-sex cohabitants, and same-sex marriage was legalised in 2005. Without diminishing the struggle that lesbians and gay men have endured to secure this somewhat revolutionary legal recognition, this article troubles its narrative of progress. In particular, we investigate the terms on which recent legal struggles have advanced, as well as the (...)
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  49.  16
    Nicla Vassallo (2013). On Same-Sex Marriage and Its Enemies. Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 26 (1):67-84.
  50.  13
    D. R. Walhof (2013). Habermas, Same-Sex Marriage and the Problem of Religion in Public Life. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (3):225-242.
    This article addresses the debate over religion in the public sphere by analysing the conception of ‘ religion ’ in the recent work of Habermas, who claims to mediate the divide between those who defend public appeals to religion without restriction and those who place limits on such appeals. I argue that Habermas’ translation requirement and his restriction on religious reasons in the institutional public sphere rest on a conception of religion as essentially apolitical in its origin. This conception, I (...)
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