28 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Samia A. Hurst [21]Samia Hurst [7]
See also:
Profile: Samia Hurst (University of Geneva, Switzerland)
  1. Ole Norheim, Samia Hurst, Nir Eyal & Dan Wikler (eds.) (forthcoming). Measuring and Evaluating Health Inequalities. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Samia A. Hurst (2014). Equivalent Confusions. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (7):15-15.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Samia A. Hurst (2014). Simplicity as Progress: Implications for Fairness in Research With Human Participants. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):40-41.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ole Fritjof Norheim, Trygve Ottersen, Alex Voorhoeve, Bonah Chitah, Richard Cookson, Norman Daniels, Nir Eyal, Walter Flores, Axel Gosseries, Daniel Hausman, Samia Hurst, Lydia Kapiriri, Toby Ord, Shlomi Segall & Frehiwot Defaye (2014). Making Fair Choices on the Path to Universal Health Coverage. World Health Organisation.
    This report by the WHO Consultative Group on Equity and Universal Health Coverage addresses how countries can make fair progress towards the goal of universal coverage. It explains the relevant tradeoffs between different desirable ends and offers guidance on how to make these tradeoffs.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Frederic Gilbert, Andrej Vranic & Samia Hurst (2013). Involuntary & Voluntary Invasive Brain Surgery: Ethical Issues Related to Acquired Aggressiveness. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (1):115-128.
    Clinical cases of frontal lobe lesions have been significantly associated with acquired aggressive behaviour. Restoring neuronal and cognitive faculties of aggressive individuals through invasive brain intervention raises ethical questions in general. However, more questions have to be addressed in cases where individuals refuse surgical treatment. The ethical desirability and permissibility of using intrusive surgical brain interventions for involuntary or voluntary treatment of acquired aggressiveness is highly questionable. This article engages with the description of acquired aggressiveness in general, and presents a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Nicolas Tavaglione, Angela K. Martin, Nathalie Mezger, Sophie Durieux‐Paillard, Anne François, Yves Jackson & Samia A. Hurst (2013). Fleshing Out Vulnerability. Bioethics 29 (1):n/a-n/a.
    In the literature on medical ethics, it is generally admitted that vulnerable persons or groups deserve special attention, care or protection. One can define vulnerable persons as those having a greater likelihood of being wronged – that is, of being denied adequate satisfaction of certain legitimate claims. The conjunction of these two points entails what we call the Special Protection Thesis. It asserts that persons with a greater likelihood of being denied adequate satisfaction of their legitimate claims deserve special attention, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Samia A. Hurst (2012). Interventions and Persons. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):10 - 11.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 10-11, January 2012.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Samia A. Hurst (2012). Éthique et santé publique. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 7 (3):59-67.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Samia A. Hurst (2012). What If Medical Graduates Are Right? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (5):37-38.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 5, Page 37-38, May 2012.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Nicolas Tavaglione & Samia A. Hurst (2012). Why Physicians Ought to Lie for Their Patients. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):4-12.
    Sometimes physicians lie to third-party payers in order to grant their patients treatment they would otherwise not receive. This strategy, commonly known as gaming the system, is generally condemned for three reasons. First, it may hurt the patient for the sake of whom gaming was intended. Second, it may hurt other patients. Third, it offends contractual and distributive justice. Hence, gaming is considered to be immoral behavior. This article is an attempt to show that, on the contrary, gaming may sometimes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Samia A. Hurst (2011). A Step Toward Pluralist Fairness. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):46-47.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 12, Page 46-47, December 2011.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Samia A. Hurst & Alex Mauron (2011). Trustworthiness in Conflict of Interest. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):40 - 41.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Angela K. Martin, Alex Mauron & Samia A. Hurst (2011). Assisted Suicide is Compatible with Medical Ethos. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):55 - 57.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 55-57, June 2011.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Samia Hurst (2010). What 'Empirical Turn in Bioethics'? Bioethics 24 (8):439-444.
    Uncertainty as to how we should articulate empirical data and normative reasoning seems to underlie most difficulties regarding the ‘empirical turn’ in bioethics. This article examines three different ways in which we could understand ‘empirical turn’. Using real facts in normative reasoning is trivial and would not represent a ‘turn’. Becoming an empirical discipline through a shift to the social and neurosciences would be a turn away from normative thinking, which we should not take. Conducting empirical research to inform normative (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Philippe Calain, Nathalie Fiore, Marc Poncin & Samia A. Hurst (2009). Research Ethics and International Epidemic Response: The Case of Ebola and Marburg Hemorrhagic Fevers. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):7-29.
    Institute for Biomedical Ethics, Geneva University Medical School * Corresponding author: Médecins Sans Frontières (OCG), rue de Lausanne 78, CH-1211 Geneva 21, Switzerland. Tel.: +41 (0)22 849 89 29; Fax: +41 (0)22 849 84 88; Email: philippe_calain{at}hotmail.com ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Outbreaks of filovirus (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fevers in Africa are typically the theater of rescue activities involving international experts and agencies tasked with reinforcing national authorities in clinical management, biological diagnosis, sanitation, (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Marion Danis & Samia Hurst (2009). Developing the Capacity of Ethics Consultants to Promote Just Resource Allocation. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (4):37-39.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Samia A. Hurst, Nathalie Mezger & Alex Mauron (2009). Allocating Resources in Humanitarian Medicine. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):89-99.
    Geneva University Medical School, Switzerland * Corresponding author: Institute for Biomedical Ethics, CMU/1 rue Michel Servet, 1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland. Tel.: +4122-3793479; Fax. +4122-3793472; Email: samia.hurst{at}unige.ch ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract Fair resource allocation in humanitarian medicine is gaining in importance and complexity, but remains insufficiently explored. It raises specific issues regarding non-ideal fairness, global solidarity, legitimacy in non-governmental institutions and conflicts of interest. All would benefit from further exploration. We propose that some (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Samia Hurst & Alex Mauron (2009). Articulating the Balance of Interests Between Humans and Other Animals. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):17-19.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Nir Eyal & Samia A. Hurst (2008). Physician Brain Drain: Can Nothing Be Done? Public Health Ethics 1 (2):180-192.
    Next SectionAccess to medicines, vaccination and care in resource-poor settings is threatened by the emigration of physicians and other health workers. In entire regions of the developing world, low physician density exacerbates child and maternal mortality and hinders treatment of HIV/AIDS. This article invites philosophers to help identify ethical and effective responses to medical brain drain. It reviews existing proposals and their limitations. It makes a case that, in resource-poor countries, ’locally relevant medical training’—teaching primarily locally endemic diseases and practice (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Samia Hurst (2008). Exigences et ébauches d'une éthique minimaliste dans la pratique clinique. Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 140 (2):233-246.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Samia A. Hurst (2008). Standing on More Than One Leg: Interdisciplinarity's Balancing Acts. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):50 – 51.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Samia A. Hurst (2008). Vulnerability in Research and Health Care; Describing the Elephant in the Room? Bioethics 22 (4):191–202.
    Despite broad agreement that the vulnerable have a claim to special protection, defining vulnerable persons or populations has proved more difficult than we would like. This is a theoretical as well as a practical problem, as it hinders both convincing justifications for this claim and the practical application of required protections. In this paper, I review consent-based, harm-based, and comprehensive definitions of vulnerability in healthcare and research with human subjects. Although current definitions are subject to critique, their underlying assumptions may (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Samia A. Hurst (2007). De-Clustering National and International Inequality. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):24 – 25.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Samia A. Hurst & Marion Danis (2007). A Framework for Rationing by Clinical Judgment. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):247-266.
    : Although rationing by clinical judgment is controversial, its acceptability partly depends on how it is practiced. In this paper, rationing by clinical judgment is defined in three different circumstances that represent increasingly wider circles of resource pools in which the rationing decision takes place: triage during acute shortage, comparison to other potential patients in a context of limited but not immediately strained resources, and determination of whether expected benefit of an intervention is deemed sufficient to warrant its cost by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Samia A. Hurst, Stella Reiter-Theil, Arnaud Perrier, Reidun Forde, Anne-Marie Slowther, Renzo Pegoraro & Marion Danis (2007). Physicians' Access to Ethics Support Services in Four European Countries. Health Care Analysis 15 (4):321-335.
    Clinical ethics support services are developing in Europe. They will be most useful if they are designed to match the ethical concerns of clinicians. We conducted a cross-sectional mailed survey on random samples of general physicians in Norway, Switzerland, Italy, and the UK, to assess their access to different types of ethics support services, and to describe what makes them more likely to have used available ethics support. Respondents reported access to formal ethics support services such as clinical ethics committees (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Samia A. Hurst, Jean-Claude Chevrolet & François Loew (2006). Methods in Clinical Ethics: A Time for Eclectic Pragmatism? Clinical Ethics 1 (3):159-164.
    Background Although methods proposed for the conduct of ethics consultation tend to be viewed as competing approaches, they may in fact function in a complementary manner. Methods We describe the experience of ethics consultation in two ethics committees at the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland. Results Both committees provide case consultation by a multi-disciplinary team of committee members, but with different processes. These differences in process do not necessarily lead to differences in outcome. Discussion Different methods of ethics consultation are (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Samia A. Hurst & Marion Danis (2005). Indecent Coverage? Protecting the Goals of Health Insurance From the Impact of Co-Payments. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (01):107-113.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Samia A. Hurst, J. Russell Teagarden, Elizabeth Garrett & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (2004). Conserving Scarce Resources: Willingness of Health Insurance Enrollees to Choose Cheaper Options. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (3):496-499.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation