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  1. Samir Chopra & Scott Dexter, Decoding Liberation: The Promise of Free and Open Source Software.
    Routledge (New Media and Cyberculture Series), July 2007.
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  2. Samir Chopra & Laurence White, Privacy and Artificial Agents, or, is Google Reading My Email?
    in Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, 2007.
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  3. Samir Chopra, Some Logics of Belief and Disbelief.
    The introduction of explicit notions of rejection, or disbelief, into logics for knowledge representation can be justified in a number of ways. Motivations range from the need for versions of negation weaker than classical negation, to the explicit recording of classic belief contraction operations in the area of belief change, and the additional levels of expressivity obtained from an extended version of belief change which includes disbelief contraction. In this paper we present four logics of disbelief which (...)
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  4. Samir Chopra & Eric Martin, First-Order Belief Revision.
    We present a model for first-order belief revision that is characterized by an underlying relevance-like relation and a background proof system. The model is extremely general in order to allow for a wide variety in these characterizing parameters. It allows some weakenings of beliefs which were initially implicit to become explicit and survive the revision process. The effects of revision are localized to the part of the theory that is influenced by the the new information. Iterated revision in this model (...)
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  5. Samir Chopra & Rohit Parikh, Relevance Sensitive Belief Structures.
    We propose a new relevance sensitive model for representing and revising belief structures, which relies on a notion of partial language splitting and tolerates some amount of inconsistency while retaining classical logic. The model preserves an agent's ability to answer queries in a coherent way using Belnap's four-valued logic. Axioms analogous to the AGM axioms hold for this new model. The distinction between implicit and explicit beliefs is represented and psychologically plausible, computationally tractable procedures for query answering and belief..
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  6. Pavlos Peppas, Samir Chopra & Norman Foo, Distance Semantics for Relevance-Sensitive Belief Revision.
    Possible-world semantics are provided for Parikh’s relevance-sensitive model for belief revision. Having Grove’s system-of-spheres construction as a base, we consider additional constraints on measuring distance between possible worlds, and we prove that, in the presence of the AGM postulates, these constraints characterize precisely Parikh’s axiom (P). These additional constraints essentially generalize a criterion of similarity that predates axiom (P) and was originally introduced in the context of Reasoning about Action. A by-product of our study is the identification of two possible (...)
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  7. Samir Chopra, Artificial Agents - Personhood in Law and Philosophy.
    validity of attributes that have been suggested as pointers of personand obligations on behalf of his household; his wife and children hood, and conclude that they will take their place within a broader were only indirectly the subject of legal rights and his slaves were matrix of pragmatic, philosophical and extra-legal concepts.
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  8. Samir Chopra, A Comparative Ethical Assessment of Free Software Licensing Schemes.
    Software is much more than sequences of instructions for a computing machine: it can be an enabler (or disabler) of political imperatives and policies. Hence, it is subject to the same assessment in a normative dimension as other political and social phenomena. The core distinction between free software and its proprietary counterpart is that free software makes available to its user the knowledge and innovation contributed by the creator(s) of the software, in the form of the created source code. From (...)
     
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  9. Samir Chopra, Distance Semantics for Relevance-Sensitive Belief Revision.
    Dept of Business Administration Dept of Computer and Knowledge Systems Group University of Patras Information Science School of Computer Science 265 00 Patras, Greece Brooklyn College of the and Engineering ppeppas@otenet.gr City University of New York University of New South Wales Brooklyn, NY 11210, USA Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia schopra@sci.brooklyn.cuny.edu norman@cse.unsw.edu.au..
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  10. Samir Chopra & Andreas Herzig (2012). Foreword. Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 11 (1-2):8-10.
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  11. Samir Chopra & Scott Dexter (2009). The Freedoms of Software and its Ethical Uses. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (4):287-297.
    The “free” in “free software” refers to a cluster of four specific freedoms identified by the Free Software Definition. The first freedom, termed “Freedom Zero,” intends to protect the right of the user to deploy software in whatever fashion, towards whatever end, he or she sees fit. But software may be used to achieve ethically questionable ends. This highlights a tension in the provision of software freedoms: while the definition explicitly forbids direct restrictions on users’ freedoms, it does not address (...)
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  12. Samir Chopra, Aditya Ghose, Thomas Meyer & Ka-Shu Wong (2008). Iterated Belief Change and the Recovery Axiom. Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (5):501 - 520.
    The axiom of recovery, while capturing a central intuition regarding belief change, has been the source of much controversy. We argue briefly against putative counterexamples to the axiom—while agreeing that some of their insight deserves to be preserved—and present additional recovery-like axioms in a framework that uses epistemic states, which encode preferences, as the object of revisions. This makes iterated revision possible and renders explicit the connection between iterated belief change and the axiom of recovery. We provide a representation theorem (...)
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  13. Richard Booth, Samir Chopra, Aditya Ghose & Thomas Meyer (2005). Belief Liberation (and Retraction). Studia Logica 79 (1):47 - 72.
    We provide a formal study of belief retraction operators that do not necessarily satisfy the (Inclusion) postulate. Our intuition is that a rational description of belief change must do justice to cases in which dropping a belief can lead to the inclusion, or ‘liberation’, of others in an agent's corpus. We provide two models of liberation via retraction operators: ρ-liberation and linear liberation. We show that the class of ρ-liberation operators is included in the class of linear ones and provide (...)
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  14. Samir Chopra, Aditya Ghose & Thomas Meyer (2003). Non-Prioritized Ranked Belief Change. Journal of Philosophical Logic 32 (4):417-443.
    Traditional accounts of belief change have been criticized for placing undue emphasis on the new belief provided as input. A recent proposal to address such issues is a framework for non-prioritized belief change based on default theories (Ghose and Goebel, 1998). A novel feature of this approach is the introduction of disbeliefs alongside beliefs which allows for a view of belief contraction as independently useful, instead of just being seen as an intermediate step in the process of belief revision. This (...)
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  15. Samir Chopra & Eric Martin (2002). Generalized Logical Consequence: Making Room for Induction in the Logic of Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 31 (3):245-280.
    We present a framework that provides a logic for science by generalizing the notion of logical (Tarskian) consequence. This framework will introduce hierarchies of logical consequences, the first level of each of which is identified with deduction. We argue for identification of the second level of the hierarchies with inductive inference. The notion of induction presented here has some resonance with Popper's notion of scientific discovery by refutation. Our framework rests on the assumption of a restricted class of structures in (...)
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  16. Samir Chopra, Konstantinos Georgatos & Rohit Parikh (2001). Relevance Sensitive Non-Monotonic Inference on Belief Sequences. Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 11 (1-2):131-150.
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