Search results for 'Samir Younés' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Samir Younés (2003). Constructing Architectural Theory. Philosophy 78 (2):233-253.score: 240.0
    Architectural theory arises from building, when the mind considers its symbolic relations to its own constructions. The intent of this essay is to discuss the intellectual causes that precede building and precede theory. It considers certain fundamental dualities in our thinking about architecture—such as image and word; type and model; imitation and invention—and the role they play in its making, its perfection as an art, and the eventual elaboration of its tenets into a theory. At a time when theories of (...)
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  2. Samir Younés (2004). The Empire of Masks: Pluralism and Monism in Politics and Architecture. Philosophy 79 (4):533-551.score: 240.0
    This essay assesses the opposition of pluralism and monism with respect to politics and architecture, developing the argument within three general areas: the spurious association between political intentions and architectural character, the distinctions and commonalties between political freedom and artistic freedom, and the adverse effect of inappropriate associations between political content and artistic form in general and, in particular, the perceptual impairment of the processes by which buildings come to be endowed with their suitable character.
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  3. Ahboucha Samir (2013). Pb Neurotoxicity and Neurotransmission: Behavioral and Therapeutic Aspects. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 30.0
  4. Tarek Sayed-Ahmed & Basim Samir (2007). An Omitting Types Theorem for First Order Logic with Infinitary Relation Symbols. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 53 (6):564-570.score: 30.0
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  5. Tarek Sayed Ahmed & Basim Samir (2007). An Omitting Types Theorem for First Order Logic with Infinitary Relation Symbols. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 53 (6):564-570.score: 30.0
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  6. Tarek Sayed Ahmed & Basim Samir (2006). Neat Embeddings and Amalgamation. Bulletin of the Section of Logic 35 (4):163-171.score: 30.0
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  7. Thierry Paquot & Christiane Younès (eds.) (2005). Géométrie, Mesure du Monde: Philosophie, Architecture, Urbain. La Découverte.score: 30.0
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  8. Thierry Paquot, Michel Lussault & Christiane Younès (eds.) (2007). Habiter, le Propre de L'Humain: Villes, Territoires Et Philosophie. La Découverte.score: 30.0
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  9. Thierry Paquot & Christiane Younès (eds.) (2009). Le Territoire des Philosophes: Lieu Et Espace Dans la Pensée au Xxe Siècle. La Découverte.score: 30.0
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  10. Okasha Samir (forthcoming). Biological Altruism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Plato. Stanford. Edu/Entries/Altruism-Biological.score: 30.0
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  11. Amin Samir (1991). Le Monde Est-Il Un Marche? Actuel Marx 9:17.score: 30.0
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  12. Tarek Sayed-Ahmed & Basim Samir (2009). The Class Snr (3) CA (K) is Not Closed Under Completions (Vol 16, Pg 427, 2008). Logic Journal of the Igpl 17 (1):155-155.score: 30.0
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  13. Christiane Younès (ed.) (2007). Henri Maldiney: Philosophie, Art Et Existence. Cerf.score: 30.0
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  14. Elliott Sober (2011). Realism, Conventionalism, and Causal Decomposition in Units of Selection: Reflections on Samir Okasha's Evolution and the Levels of Selection. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (1):221-231.score: 18.0
    I discuss two subjects in Samir Okasha’s excellent book, Evolution and the Levels of Selection. In consonance with Okasha’s critique of the conventionalist view of the units of selection problem, I argue that conventionalists have not attended to what realists mean by group, individual, and genic selection. In connection with Okasha’s discussion of the Price equation and contextual analysis, I discuss whether the existence of these two quantitative frameworks is a challenge to realism.
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  15. Ward E. Jones (2000). Underdetermination and the Explanation of Theory-Acceptance: A Response to Samir Okasha. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (3):299 – 304.score: 18.0
    After a thorough examination of the claim that "the underdetermination of theory by evidence forces us to seek sociological explanations of scientists' cognitive choices", Samir Okasha concludes that the only significant problem with this argument is that the thesis of underdetermination is not adequately supported. Against Okasha, I argue (1) that there is a very good reason to question the inference from the underdetermination of a theory to a sociological account of that theory's acceptance, and (2) that Okasha's own (...)
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  16. Stephen M. Downes (2010). Moving Past the Levels of Selection Debates: Review of Samir Okasha's Evolution and the Levels of Selection. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):417-423.score: 15.0
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  17. Massimo Pigliucci (2009). Samir Okasha: Evolution and the Levels of Selection. Biology and Philosophy 24 (4):551-560.score: 15.0
    The debate about the levels of selection has been one of the most controversial both in evolutionary biology and in philosophy of science. Okasha’s book makes the sort of contribution that simply will not be able to be ignored by anyone interested in this field for many years to come. However, my interest here is in highlighting some examples of how Okasha goes about discussing his material to suggest that his book is part of an increasingly interesting trend that sees (...)
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  18. Jonathan Birch (2013). Samir Okasha and Ken Binmore (Eds) Evolution and Rationality: Decisions, Cooperation, and Strategic Behaviour. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (3):669-673.score: 15.0
  19. Alirio Rosales (2008). Samir Okasha:Evolution and the Levels of Selection,:Evolution and the Levels of Selection. Philosophy of Science 75 (2):254-256.score: 15.0
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  20. M. Haber (2008). Review: Samir Okasha: Evolution and the Levels of Selection. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (468):1116-1119.score: 15.0
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  21. Benjamin Mako Hill (2008). Samir Chopra, Scott D. Dexter, Decoding Liberation: The Promise of Free and Open Source Software. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 18 (2):297-299.score: 15.0
  22. Simon M. Huttegger (2007). Selection at Multiple Levels: Evolution and the Levels of Selection, Samir Okasha . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006, (288 Pp; £32.00 Hbk; ISBN 978-0-19-926797-2). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 2 (4):429-431.score: 15.0
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  23. Jonathan Michael Kaplan (2007). Review of Samir Okasha, Evolution and the Levels of Selection. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (4).score: 15.0
  24. D. A. Coady (2012). A Legal Theory for Autonomous Artificial Agents by Samir Chopra and Laurence F White. Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 37 (2012):349-50.score: 15.0
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  25. Privileged Access Naturalized, Jordi Fernández & Anthony Hatzimoysis (2003). Temporal Language and Temporal Reality/Dyke, Heather 380-391 Quasi-Realism's Problem of Autonomous Effects/Tenenbaum, Sergio 392-409 Interpreting Mill's Qualitative Hedonism/Riley, Jonathan 410-418 Probabilistic Induction and Hume's Problem: Reply to Lange/Okasha, Samir 419-424 Are You a Sim?/Weatherson, Brian 425-431. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 53 (212):212.score: 15.0
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  26. Joseph LaPorte (2003). Samir Okasha, Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (4):268-269.score: 15.0
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  27. Mohammad Al-Asad & Federico Alvarez Arrieta (2007). Samir Kassir Square in Beirut-Urban Open Space in the Lebanese Capital. Topos 61:23.score: 15.0
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  28. D. M. Berry (2008). The Poverty of Networks: The Wealth of Networks by Yochai Benkler New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2007, Pp. 515, ISBN 0 300 12577 1, Pbk 11.99 Decoding Liberation: The Promise of Free and Open Source Software by Samir Chopra and Scott Dexter New York: Routledge, 2008, Pp. 232, ISBN 0 415 97893 4, Hbk 60.00 The Exploit: A Theory of Networks by Alexander Galloway and Eugene Thacker Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press, 2007, Pp. 256, ISBN 0 816 65044 6, Pbk 12.00. [REVIEW] Theory, Culture and Society 25 (7-8):364-372.score: 15.0
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  29. What Compositionality StiU Can Do (2001). What Did Hume Reauy Show About Induction? Samir Okasha. Philosophy 76 (295).score: 15.0
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  30. Chamsy el-Ojeili (2008). Review: Couze Venn, The Postcolonial Challenge: Towards Alternative Worlds (Sage, 2006); Samir Kassir, Being Arab (Verso, 2006). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 92 (1):134-137.score: 15.0
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  31. Enrique Alí González Ordosgoitti (2012). Samir Amín: Los desafíos de la mundialización. Apuntes Filosóficos 16.score: 15.0
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  32. Ryan Muldoon (2013). Evolution and Rationality: Decisions, Co-Operation and Strategic Behaviour, Samir Okasha and Ken Binmore (Eds.). Cambridge University Press, 2012, X + 281 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):425-430.score: 15.0
  33. J. De Visscher (2008). Younes, Chr., Henri Maldiney. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 70 (2):404.score: 15.0
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  34. Jake Chandler (2010). The Transmission of Support: A Bayesian Re-Analysis. [REVIEW] Synthese 176 (3):333 - 343.score: 9.0
    Crispin Wright’s discussion of the notion of ‘transmission-failure’ promises to have important philosophical ramifications, both in epistemology and beyond. This paper offers a precise, formal characterisation of the concept within a Bayesian framework. The interpretation given avoids the serious shortcomings of a recent alternative proposal due to Samir Okasha.
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  35. Samir Okasha (2002). Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    What is science? Is there a real difference between science and myth? Is science objective? Can science explain everything? This Very Short Introduction provides a concise overview of the main themes of contemporary philosophy of science. Beginning with a short history of science to set the scene, Samir Okasha goes on to investigate the nature of scientific reasoning, scientific explanation, revolutions in science, and theories such as realism and anti-realism. He also looks at philosophical issues in particular sciences, including (...)
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  36. Samir Okasha (2006/2008). Evolution and the Levels of Selection. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    Does natural selection act primarily on individual organisms, on groups, on genes, or on whole species? The question of levels of selection - on which biologists and philosophers have long disagreed - is central to evolutionary theory and to the philosophy of biology. Samir Okasha's comprehensive analysis gives a clear account of the philosophical issues at stake in the current debate.
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  37. Samir Okasha (2012). Wynne-Edwards and the History of Group Selection. Metascience 21 (2):355-357.score: 6.0
    Wynne-Edwards and the history of group selection Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9613-6 Authors Samir Okasha, Department of Philosophy, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TB UK Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  38. Samir Rihani (2002). Complex Systems Theory and Development Practice: Understanding Non-Linear Realities. Zed Books.score: 6.0
    Here, for the first time, development studies encounters the set of ideas popularly known as 'Chaos Theory'. Samir Rihani applies to the processes of economic development, ideas from complex adaptive systems like uncertainty, complexity, and unpredictability. Rihani examines various aspects of the development process - including the World Bank, debt, and the struggle against poverty - and demonstrates the limitations of fundamentally linear thinking in an essentially non-linear world.
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  39. Samir Selmanovic (2009). It's Really All About God: Reflections of a Muslim Atheist Jewish Christian. Jossey-Bass.score: 6.0
    Such obvious truth must be made even more obvious, and this is exactly what Samir Selmanovic is doing for all of us and for the future of humanity.
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  40. Samir Amin (2006). A Life Looking Forward: Memoirs of an Independent Marxist. Zed Books.score: 6.0
    Samir Amin depicts a world in which NATO has taken over the role of the United Nations, in which US hegemony is more or less complete, in which millions are condemned to die in order to preserve the social order of the US, Europe and Japan. Amin's analyses of the Gulf War, the wars in former Yugoslavia and the war in Central Asia reveal the scope of US strategic aims. He argues that the political and military dimension of US (...)
     
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  41. Andrew Hamilton, Samir Okasha & Jay Odenbaugh, Philosophy of Biology.score: 3.0
    Philosophy of biology is a vibrant and growing field. From initial roots in the metaphysics of species (Ghiselin, Hull), questions about whether biology has laws of nature akin to those of physics (Ruse, Hull), and discussions of teleology and function (Grene 1974, Brandon 1981), the field has grown since the 1970s to include a vast range of topics. Over the last few decades, philosophy has had an important impact on biology, partly through following the model of engagement with science that (...)
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  42. Samir Okasha (2000). The Underdetermination of Theory by Data and the "Strong Programme" in the Sociology of Knowledge. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (3):283 – 297.score: 3.0
    Advocates of the "strong programme" in the sociology of knowledge have argued that, because scientific theories are "underdetermined" by data, sociological factors must be invoked to explain why scientists believe the theories they do. I examine this argument, and the responses to it by J.R. Brown (1989) and L. Laudan (1996). I distinguish between a number of different versions of the underdetermination thesis, some trivial, some substantive. I show that Brown's and Laudan's attempts to refute the sociologists' argument fail. Nonetheless, (...)
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  43. Luca Moretti (2012). Wright, Okasha and Chandler on Transmission Failure. Synthese 184 (3):217-234.score: 3.0
    Crispin Wright has given an explanation of how a first time warrant can fall short of transmitting across a known entailment. Formal epistemologists have struggled to turn Wright’s informal explanation into cogent Bayesian reasoning. In this paper, I analyse two Bayesian models of Wright’s account respectively proposed by Samir Okasha and Jake Chandler. I argue that both formalizations are unsatisfactory for different reasons, and I lay down a third Bayesian model that appears to me to capture the valid kernel (...)
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  44. Samir Okasha (2002). Darwinian Metaphysics: Species and the Question of Essentialism. Synthese 131 (2):191-213.score: 3.0
    Biologists and philosophers of biology typically regard essentialism about speciesas incompatible with modern Darwinian theory. Analytic metaphysicians such asKripke, Putnam and Wiggins, on the other hand, believe that their essentialist thesesare applicable to biological kinds. I explore this tension. I show that standard anti-essentialist considerations only show that species do not have intrinsic essential properties. I argue that while Putnam and Kripke do make assumptions that contradict received biological opinion, their model of natural kinds, suitably modified, is partially applicable to (...)
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  45. Samir Okasha, Ken Binmore, Jonathan Grose & Cédric Paternotte (2010). Cooperation, Conflict, Sex and Bargaining. Biology and Philosophy 25 (2):257-267.score: 3.0
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  46. Samir Gandesha (1991). The Theatre of the "Other": Adorno, Poststructuralism and the Critique of Identity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 17 (3):243-263.score: 3.0
  47. Samir Okasha (2001). Why Won't the Group Selection Controversy Go Away? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):25-50.score: 3.0
    The group selection controversy is about whether natural selection ever operates at the level of groups, rather than at the level of individual organisms. Traditionally, group selection has been invoked to explain the existence of altruistic behaviour in nature. However, most contemporary evolutionary biologists are highly sceptical of the hypothesis of group selection, which they regard as biologically implausible and not needed to explain the evolution of altruism anyway. But in their recent book, Elliot Sober and David Sloan Wilson [1998] (...)
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  48. Samir Gandesha (2004). Writing and Judging: Adorno, Arendt and the Chiasmus of Natural History. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (4):445-475.score: 3.0
    This essay engages in a comparative analysis of Theodor W. Adorno and Hannah Arendt. It does so by situating both thinkers in terms of their respective Auseinandersetzungen with the fundamental ontology of Martin Heidegger. While Heidegger seeks to engage in a Destruktion of the opposition between time and being, Adorno and Arendt seek to understand this relation critically in terms of the concept of ‘natural history’. For both, a reading of Kant’s Third Critique becomes the indispensable means by which it (...)
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  49. Samir Okasha (2011). Précis of Evolution and the Levels of Selection. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (1):212-220.score: 3.0
    The ‘levels of selection’ question is one of the most fundamental in evolutionary biology, for it arises directly from the logic of Darwinism. As is well-known, the principle of natural selection is entirely abstract; it says that any entities satisfying certain conditions will evolve by natural selection, whatever those entities are. (These conditions are: variability, associated fitness differences, and heritability (cf. Lewontin 1970).) This fact, when combined with the fact that the biological world is hierarchically structured, i.e. smaller biological units (...)
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  50. Samir Okasha (2001). What Did Hume Really Show About Induction? Philosophical Quarterly 51 (204):307-327.score: 3.0
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