6 found
Sort by:
  1. Samuel DeCanio, Jeffrey Friedman, David R. Mayhew, Michael H. Murakami & Nick Weller (2008). Roundtable 3: Political Ignorance, Empirical Realities. Critical Review 20 (4):463-480.
  2. Samuel DeCanio (2007). The Autonomy of the Democratic State: Rejoinder to Carpenter, Ginsberg, and Shefter. Critical Review 19 (1):187-196.
    ABSTRACT While democratic states may manipulate public opinion and mobilize society to serve their interests, a focus on such active efforts may distract us from the passive, default condition of ignorance?based state autonomy. The electorate?s ignorance ensures that most of what modern states do is unknown to ?society,? and thus need not even acquire social approval, whether manipulated or spontaneous. Similarly, suggestions that democratic states may be ?captured? by societal groups must take cognizance of the factors that enable elites to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Samuel DeCanio (2006). Mass Opinion and American Political Development. Critical Review 18 (1-3):143-155.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Samuel DeCanio (2005). Murray Edelman on Symbols and Ideology in Democratic Politics. Critical Review 17 (3-4):339-350.
    Abstract For Murray Edelman, political realities are largely inaccessible to the public, save by the mediation of symbols generated by elites. Such symbols often create the illusion of political solutions to complex problems?solutions devised by experts, implemented by effective leaders, and undemonstrably successful in their results.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Samuel DeCanio (2000). Beyond Marxist State Theory: State Autonomy in Democratic Societies. Critical Review 14 (2-3):215-236.
    Abstract Recent theories of the state often draw attention to states? autonomy from social preferences. This paper suggests that the phenomenon of public ignorance is the primary mechanism responsible for state autonomy in democratic polities. Such theorists as Skocpol and Poulantzus, who do not take account of public ignorance, either underestimate the state's autonomy or stress causal mechanisms that are necessary but not sufficient conditions for its autonomy. Gram?sci's concept of ideological hegemony is promising, even though it is far too (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Samuel DeCanio (2000). Bringing the State Back in … Again. Critical Review 14 (2-3):139-146.
    Abstract Previous scholarship on states? autonomy from the interests of society has focused primarily on nondemocratic societies, raising the question of whether ?state theory? is relevant to modern states. Public?opinion research documenting the ignorance of mass polities suggests that modern states may be as autonomous as, or more autonomous than, premodern states. Premodern states? autonomy was secured by their ability to suppress societal dissent by force of arms. Modern states may have less recourse to overt coercion because the very thing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation