20 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
Samuel J. Kerstein [21]Samuel Joseph Kerstein [1]
  1.  23
    Samuel J. Kerstein & Greg Bognar (2010). Complete Lives in the Balance. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):37 – 45.
    The allocation of scarce health care resources such as flu treatment or organs for transplant presents stark problems of distributive justice. Persad, Wertheimer, and Emanuel have recently proposed a novel system for such allocation. Their “complete lives system” incorporates several principles, including ones that prescribe saving the most lives, preserving the most life-years, and giving priority to persons between 15 and 40 years old. This paper argues that the system lacks adequate moral foundations. Persad and colleagues' defense of giving priority (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  2.  29
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2002). Kant's Search for the Supreme Principle of Morality. Cambridge University Press.
    At the core of Kant's ethics lies the claim that if there is a supreme principle of morality then it cannot be a principle based on utilitarianism or Aristotelian perfectionism or the Ten Commandments. The only viable candidate for such a principle is the categorical imperative. This book is the most detailed investigation of this claim. It constructs a new, criterial reading of Kant's derivation of one version of the categorical imperative: the Formula of Universal Law. This reading shows this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  3. Samuel J. Kerstein (2009). Kantian Condemnation of Commerce in Organs. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):pp. 147-169.
  4.  2
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2014). Are Kidney Markets Morally Permissible If Vendors Do Not Benefit? American Journal of Bioethics 14 (10):29-30.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  7
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2013). How to Treat Persons. OUP Oxford.
    Samuel J. Kerstein develops a new, broadly Kantian account of the ethical issues that arise when a person treats another merely as a means. He explores how Kantian principles on the dignity of persons shed light on pressing issues in modern bioethics, including the distribution of scarce medical resources and the regulation of markets in organs.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  9
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2006). Reason, Sentiment, and Categorical Imperatives. In James Lawrence Dreier (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Moral Theory. Blackwell Pub. 6--129.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. Samuel J. Kerstein (2005). Kant's Search for the Supreme Principle of Morality. Cambridge University Press.
    At the core of Kant's ethics lies the claim that if there is a supreme principle of morality then it cannot be a principle based on utilitarianism or Aristotelian perfectionism or the Ten Commandments. The only viable candidate for such a principle is the categorical imperative. This book is the most detailed investigation of this claim. It constructs a new, criterial reading of Kant's derivation of one version of the categorical imperative: the Formula of Universal Law. This reading shows this (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  17
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2001). Korsgaard's Kantian Arguments for the Value of Humanity. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):23-52.
  9.  1
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2015). Dignity, Disability, and Lifespan. Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4):n/a-n/a.
    In the Paraplegia Case, we must choose either to preserve the life of a paraplegic for 10 years or that of someone in full health for the same duration. Non-consequentialists reject a benefit-maximising view, which holds that since the person in full health will have a higher quality of life, we ought to save him straightaway. In the Unequal Lifespan Case, we face a choice between saving one person for 5 years in full health and another for 25 years in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  14
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2009). Death, Dignity, and Respect. Social Theory and Practice 35 (4):505-530.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  14
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2003). Review: Stratton-Lake, Duty and Moral Worth. Ethics 113 (3):721-724.
  12.  13
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2002). Review: Munzel, Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The "Critical" Link of Morality, Anthropology, and Reflective Judgment. [REVIEW] Ethics 112 (3):634-637.
  13.  12
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2008). Review: Wood, Kantian Ethics. Ethics 118 (4):761-767.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  8
    Samuel J. Kerstein (1999). The Kantian Moral Worth of Actions Contrary to Duty. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 53 (4):530 - 552.
    This paper concerns Kant's view of the relations between an actions's moral permissibility and its moral worth. In the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant holds that only morally permissible actions can have moral worth. By restricting moral worth to morally permissible actions, Kant generates an asymmetrical account of how two kinds of failure affect an actions's moral worth. While failure to judge correctly whether one's action is morally permissible precludes it from having moral worth failure to attain the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  5
    Samuel J. Kerstein (2004). Review: Hill, Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives. Ethics 114 (2):350-353.
  16.  7
    Samuel J. Kerstein & Greg Bognar (2010). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Complete Lives in the Balance”. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):W3 – W5.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Samuel J. Kerstein (2008). Treating Oneself Merely as a Means. In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtues. Walter De Gruyter
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Samuel J. Kerstein (2009). Deriving the Supreme Moral Principle From Common Moral Ideas. In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Samuel J. Kerstein (2002). Kant's Religion and Reflective Judgment. Ethics 112 (3):634--637.
  20. Samuel J. Kerstein (2009). Kant's Search for the Supreme Principle of Morality. Cambridge University Press.
    At the core of Kant's ethics lies the claim that if there is a supreme principle of morality then it cannot be a principle based on utilitarianism or Aristotelian perfectionism or the Ten Commandments. The only viable candidate for such a principle is the categorical imperative. This book is the most detailed investigation of this claim. It constructs a new, criterial reading of Kant's derivation of one version of the categorical imperative: the Formula of Universal Law. This reading shows this (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography