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  1. Sandra Harding (forthcoming). After the Neutrality Ideal: Science, Politics, and" Strong Objectivity". Social Research.
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  2. Sandra G. Harding (ed.) (2011). The Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies Reader. Duke University Press.
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  3. Sandra Harding (2009). Standpoint Theories: Productively Controversial. Hypatia 24 (4):192 - 200.
  4. Sandra Harding (2008). How Many Epistemologies Should Guide the Production of Scientific Knowledge?: A Response to Maffie, Mendieta, and Wylie. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 212-219.
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  5. Sandra Harding (2006). Modernity, Science, and Democracy. Social Philosophy Today 22:17-42.
    Thinking about Western sciences has always also meant making assumptions about modernity and about democratic social relations. Yet in recent decades the standard meanings and referents of all three of these terms—”Western sciences,” “modernity,” and “democratic social relations”—have come under skeptical scrutiny. This essay will look at three critics of modernity who also examine the political practices and consequences of Western sciences. All three also think postmodernisms to be valuable but merely symptomologies without useful prescriptions for change, and they all (...)
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  6. Sandra Harding (2006). Two Influential Theories of Ignorance and Philosophy's Interests in Ignoring Them. Hypatia 21 (3):20-36.
    Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud provided powerful accounts of systematic interested ignorance. Fifty years ago, Anglo-American philosophies of science stigmatized Marx's and Freud's analyses as models of irrationality. They remain disvalued today, at a time when virtually all other humanities and social science disciplines have returned to extract valuable insights from them. Here the argument is that there are reasons distinctive to philosophy why such theories were especially disvalued then and why they remain so today. However, there are even better (...)
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  7. Sandra Harding (2006). Transformation Vs. Resistance Identity Projects: Epistemological Resources for Social Justice Movements. In Linda Alcoff (ed.), Identity Politics Reconsidered. Palgrave Macmillan. 246--263.
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  8. Sandra Harding (2005). From the Woman Question in Science to the Science Question in Feminism. In Nico Stehr & Reiner Grundmann (eds.), Knowledge: Critical Concepts. Routledge. 327--342.
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  9. Sandra Harding (2005). "Science and Democracy:" Replayed or Redesigned? Social Epistemology 19 (1):5 – 18.
    Mid-Twentieth Century declarations characterizing science as a 'Little democracy' and as autonomous from society continue to shape the arguments of scientists' and critics of science studies, including Meera Nanda's arguments. Yet such an image of science has long lost whatever empirical support it ever posessed. This article shares Nanda's concern to envision sciences which support social justice projects, but not the particular criticisms she makes of Feminist, post-colonial, and post-kuhnian science studies.
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  10. Sandra Harding (2004). Introduction: Standpoint Theory as a Site of Political, Philosophic, and Scientific Debate. In Sandra G. Harding (ed.), The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader: Intellectual and Political Controversies. Routledge. 1--15.
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  11. Sandra G. Harding (2004). A Socially Relevant Philosophy of Science? Resources From Standpoint Theory's Controversiality. Hypatia 19 (1):25-47.
    : Feminist standpoint theory remains highly controversial: it is widely advocated, used to guide research and justify its results, and yet is also vigorously denounced. This essay argues that three such sites of controversy reveal the value of engaging with standpoint theory as a way of reflecting on and debating some of the most anxiety-producing issues in contemporary Western intellectual and political life. Engaging with standpoint theory enables a socially relevant philosophy of science.
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  12. Sandra G. Harding (ed.) (2004). The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader: Intellectual and Political Controversies. Routledge.
    In the mid-1970s and early 1980s, several feminist theorists began developing alternatives to the traditional methods of scientific research. The result was a new theory, now recognized as Standpoint Theory, which caused heated debate and radically altered the way research is conducted. The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader is the first anthology to collect the most important essays on the subject as well as more recent works that bring the topic up-to-date. Leading feminist scholar and one of the founders of Standpoint (...)
     
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  13. Robert Figueroa & Sandra G. Harding (eds.) (2003). Science and Other Cultures: Issues in Philosophies of Science and Technology. Routledge.
    In this pioneering new book, Sandra Harding and Robert Figueroa bring together an important collection of original essays by leading philosophers exploring an extensive range of diversity issues for the philosophy of science and technology. The essays gathered in this volume extend current philosophical discussion of science and technology beyond the standard feminist and gender analyses that have flourished over the past two decades, by bringing a thorough and truly diverse set of cultural, racial, and ethical concerns to bear on (...)
     
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  14. Sandra Harding (2003). 8 After Objectivism Vs. Relativism. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 122.
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  15. Sandra Harding (2003). A World of Sciences. In Robert Figueroa & Sandra G. Harding (eds.), Science and Other Cultures: Issues in Philosophies of Science and Technology. Routledge. 49--69.
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  16. Sandra Harding (2003). Dysfunctional Universality Claims? Scientific, Epistemological, and Political Issues. In Robert C. Scharff & Val Dusek (eds.), Philosophy of Technology: The Technological Condition: An Anthology. Blackwell Publishers. 154--169.
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  17. Sandra G. Harding & Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.) (2003). Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This collection of essays, first published two decades ago, presents central feminist critiques and analyses of natural and social sciences and their philosophies. Unfortunately, in spite of the brilliant body of research and scholarship in these fields in subsequent decades, the insights of these essays remain as timely now as they were then: philosophy and the sciences still presume kinds of social innocence to which they are not entitled. The essays focus on Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hobbes, Rousseau, and Marx; on (...)
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  18. Sandra Harding (2002). American Philosophy as a Technototem. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):195 - 201.
    John McCumber's Time in the Ditch: American Philosophy and the McCarthy Era provides a compelling account of a repressed part of philosophy's history and its tragic consequences for subsequent decades of philosophic practice in the U.S. Political values and interests originating in McCarthyism got encoded within abstract conceptual frameworks, propelling analytic philosophy to an undeserved position of authority while depriving it of critical self-understanding. This comment identifies residues of McCarthyism still playing out in the Science Wars, and the career of (...)
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  19. Nicholas Rescher, Richard Shusterman, Linda Martín Alcoff, Lorraine Code, Sandra Harding, Bat-Ami Bar On, John Lachs, John J. Stuhr, Douglas Kellner, Thomas E. Wartenberg, Paul C. Taylor, Nancey Murphy, Charles W. Mills, Nancy Tuana & Joseph Margolis (2002). The Philosophical I: Personal Reflections on Life in Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  20. Sandra Harding & N. Vassallo (2001). Is Science Multi-Cultural? Postcolonialism, Feminism, and Epistemologies. Epistemologia 24 (1):157-158.
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  21. Uma Narayan & Sandra Harding (eds.) (2000). Decentering the Center: Philosophy for a Multicultural, Postcolonial, and Feminist World. Indiana University Press.
    The essays in this volume bring to their focuses on philosophical issues the new angles of vision created by the multicultural, global, and postcolonial feminisms that have been developing around us.
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  22. Sandra Harding (1999). Feminist Science Criticism. In Robert Klee (ed.), Scientific Inquiry: Readings in the Philosophy of Science. Oxford University Press. 274.
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  23. Sandra Harding (1998). Gender, Development, and Post-Enlightenment Philosophies of Science. Hypatia 13 (3):146 - 167.
    Recent "gender, environment, and sustainable development" accounts raise pointed questions about the complicity of Enlightenment philosophies of science with failures of Third World development policies and the current environmental crisis. The strengths of these analyses come from distinctive ways they link androcentric, economistic, and nature-blind aspects of development thinking to "the Enlightenment dream." In doing so they share perspectives with and provide resources for other influential schools of science studies.
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  24. Sandra Harding & Uma Narayan (1998). Border Crossings: Multicultural and Postcolonial Feminist Challenges to Philosophy (Part II). Hypatia 13 (3):1-5.
  25. Uma Narayan & Sandra Harding (1998). Introduction. Border Crossings: Multicultural and Postcolonial Feminist Challenges to Philosophy (Part I). Hypatia 13 (2):1-6.
  26. Sandra Harding (1996). Multicultural and Global Feminist Philosophies of Science: Resources and Challenges. In. In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. 263--287.
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  27. Sandra Harding (1996). Science is Good is" Good to Think With. In Andrew Ross (ed.), Science Wars. Duke University Press. 23.
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  28. What Is‘Strong Objectivity, Sandra Harding & Donna Haraway (1996). Both Ways. In Evelyn Fox Keller & Helen E. Longino (eds.), Feminism and Science. Oxford University Press.
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  29. Sandra Harding (1995). “Strong Objectivity”: A Response to the New Objectivity Question. Synthese 104 (3):331 - 349.
    Where the old objectivity question asked, Objectivity or relativism: which side are you on?, the new one refuses this choice, seeking instead to bypass widely recognized problems with the conceptual framework that restricts the choices to these two. It asks, How can the notion of objectivity be updated and made useful for contemporary knowledge-seeking projects? One response to this question is the strong objectivity program that draws on feminist standpoint epistemology to provide a kind of logic of discovery for maximizing (...)
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  30. Sandra Harding (1994). Ist Die Westliche Wissenschaft Eine Ethnowissenschaft? Herausforderung Und Chance für Die Feministische Wissenschaftsforschung. Die Philosophin 5 (9):26-44.
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  31. Sandra Harding (1994). Social Construction. In Anne Herrmann & Abigail J. Stewart (eds.), Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Westview Press. 343.
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  32. Sandra Harding (1994). Wissenschaftsgeschichten. Die Philosophin 5 (9):26-44.
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  33. Sandra Harding (ed.) (1993). The "Racial" Economy of Science: Toward a Democratic Future. Indiana University Press.
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  34. Sandra Harding (1992). After Eurocentrism: Challenges for the Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:311 - 319.
    Two themes in postcolonial science studies pose unusual challenges for philosophers of science. According to these accounts, the cognitive/technical core of Western sciences, not just their technologies, applications, and social institutions, is permeated by distinctive cultural and political commitments. In this sense, Western sciences are "ethnosciences." Moreover, these analysts want to delink their societies' scientific and technological projects from the West's in order to develop fully modern sciences within their own culturally distinctive scientific traditions. This paper suggests some fruitful ways (...)
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  35. Sandra Harding (1991). Whose Science? Whose Knowledge? Thinking From Women's Lives. Cornell University.
    Sandra Harding here develops further the themes first addressed in her widely influential book, The Science Question in Feminism, and conducts a compelling analysis of feminist theories on the philosophical problem of how we know what we ...
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  36. Sandra Harding (1990). Starting Thought From Women's Lives: Eight Resources for Maximizing Objectivity. Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):140-149.
  37. Eva Feder Kittay, Carol Gilligan, Annette C. Baier, Michael Stocker, Christina H. Sommers, Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Virginia Held, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Seyla Benhabib, George Sher, Marilyn Friedman, Jonathan Adler, Sara Ruddick, Mary Fainsod, David D. Laitin, Lizbeth Hasse & Sandra Harding (1989). Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  38. Sandra G. Harding (1988). [Book Review] the Science Question in Feminism. [REVIEW] Feminist Studies 14:561-574.
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  39. Sandra Harding (1987). The Curious Coincidence of Feminine and African Moralities: Challenges for Feminist Theory. In Eva Feder Kittay & Diana T. Meyers (eds.), Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. 296--315.
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  40. Sandra Harding (1987). The Garden in the Machine. In Nancy J. Nersessian (ed.), The Process of Science: Contemporary Philosophical Approaches to Understanding Scientific Practice. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
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  41. Sandra Harding (1987). The Method Question. Hypatia 2 (3):19 - 35.
    A continuing concern of many feminists and non-feminists alike has been to identify a distinctive feminist method of inquiry. This essay argues that this method question is misguided and should be abandoned. In doing so it takes up the distinctions between and relationships among methods, methodologies and epistemologies; proposes that the concern to identify sources of the power of feminist analyses motivates the method question; and suggests how to pursue this project.
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  42. Sandra Harding (1986). Women, Reason and Nature. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (1):101-102.
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  43. Sandra Harding (1982). Is Gender a Variable in Conceptions of Rationality? A Survey of Issues. Dialectica 36 (2‐3):225-242.
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  44. Sandra Harding (1980). The Norms of Social Inquiry and Masculine Experience. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:305 - 324.
    Disproportionate reliance on distinctively masculine social experience contributes a false plausibility to the shared assumptions of "naturalist" and "intentionalist" approaches to the philosophy of social science. This social bias leads these approaches to recommend purposes, contents, forms, methods and ethics of social inquiry which produce both insoluble problems for both approaches and also distorted accounts of social reality. The paper explores some of the reasons why men's experience has been granted this unjustifiable epistemological privilege.
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  45. Sandra G. Harding (1979). The Social Function of the Empiricist Conception of Mind. Metaphilosophy 10 (1):38–47.
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  46. Sandra G. Harding (1978). Four Contributions Values Can Make to the Objectivity of Social Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1978:199 - 209.
    Carnap reports that while all of the members of the Vienna Circle "were strongly interested in social and political progress," except for Neurath, they all insisted that the "intrusion" of political points of view into the methodology of science would violate the purity of scientific method. In opposition to this still dominant view of the relationship between moral/political values and objective inquiry, this paper specifies four ways in which certain moral/political values are necessary for maximizing objective inquiry in social science. (...)
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  47. Sandra G. Harding (1977). Harman's Thoughts. Metaphilosophy 8 (January):62-71.
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  48. Graham Priest & Sandra Harding (1977). Can Theories Be Refuted? Philosophical Quarterly 27 (106):73.
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  49. Sandra Harding (1976). The Inconsistent Scientific Realist. Philosophical Studies 30 (3):203 - 205.
    Many philosophers who consider themselves scientific realists also argue for physicalism (quine is one). But if scientific realism is construed in such a way that it is logically independent of physicalism, One cannot consistently defend both positions. If it is construed so that it is not independent of physicalism, The problem is simply displaced to an incoherence within scientific realism. "historical physicalism" is what scientific realists should be defending. But so far no scientific realists have defended this version of physicalism.
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