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  1. Sandra L. Borden (2013). Detroit: Exploiting Images of Poverty. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 28 (2):134-137.
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  2. Sandra L. Borden (2012). A Transformative Vision of the Media. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (3):206-210.
    Journal of Mass Media Ethics, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 206-210, July-September.
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  3. Sandra L. Borden (2012). Press Apologias: A New Paradigm for the New Transparency? Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (1):15-30.
    This article examines the requirements for ethical press apologias, defined as attempts to defend credibility when accused of ethical failure. Facing changing transparency expectations, apologists may fail to fully respond to injured stakeholders. Criticisms of CBS News' flawed report on President Bush's National Guard service illustrated this problem. Hearit's (2005b) paradigm for ethical apologias is applied to ?RatherGate? to see if and where the paradigmatic criteria fell short. A revised paradigm is proposed.
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  4. Christopher Meyers, Wendy N. Wyatt, Sandra L. Borden & Edward Wasserman (2012). Professionalism, Not Professionals. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (3):189-205.
    The proliferation of news and information sources has motivated a need to identify those providing legitimate journalism. One temptation is to go the route of such fields as medicine and law, namely to formally professionalize. This gives a clear method for determining who is a member, with an array of associated responsibilities and rewards. We argue that making such a formal move in journalism is a mistake: Journalism does not meet the traditional criteria, and its core ethos is in conflict (...)
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  5. Sandra L. Borden (2010). As Lee Wilkins Argues in Her Article in This Collection, Journalism Seems to Come Into its Own During Natural Disasters. The Sheer Drama of Such Events Makes for Great Storytelling and Provides a National Showcase for the Talents of Local Reporters. This Was Illustrated Again in 2005 When the Great Flood Caused by Hurricane Katrina Overcame New Orleans and Chased Out the Staff of the Times-Picayune. At First, the Paper Was Unable to Issue a Print Edi-Tion and Instead Published on its Affiliated Nola ... [REVIEW] In Christopher Meyers (ed.), Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press. 53.
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  6. Sandra L. Borden & Chad Tew (2007). The Role of Journalist and the Performance of Journalism: Ethical Lessons From "Fake" News (Seriously). Journal of Mass Media Ethics 22 (4):300 – 314.
    Some have suggested that Jon Stewart of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (TDS) and Stephen Colbert of The Colbert Report (TCR) represent a new kind of journalist. We propose, rather, that Stewart and Colbert are imitators who do not fully inhabit the role of journalist. They are interesting because sometimes they do a better job performing the functions of journalism than journalists themselves. However, Stewart and Colbert do not share journalists' moral commitments. Therefore, their performances are neither motivated nor (...)
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  7. Sharon Schnall, Tim McGuire, Jeffrey A. Dvorkin & Sandra L. Borden (2004). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (2):138 – 148.
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  8. Sandra L. Borden & Michael S. Pritchard (2001). Conflict of Interest in Journalism. In Michael Davis & Andrew Stark (eds.), Conflict of Interest in the Professions. Oxford University Press. 73--91.
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  9. Sandra L. Borden (2000). A Model for Evaluating Journalist Resistance to Business Constraints. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 15 (3):149 – 166.
    Should journalists resist business constraints they perceive as a threat to their professional integrity? This article suggests that the answer, at least sometimes, is yes. But in choosing a resistance strategy, journalists should not consider the "take this job and shove it" stance as the only option with moral integrity-or even as the best ethical option. This article develops a model of resistance strategies using the experiences of journalists at one newspaper to illustrate the range of options available for resisting (...)
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  10. Sandra L. Borden (2000). Foreword. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 15 (3):147 – 148.
    Should journalists resist business constraints they perceive as a threat to their professional integrity? This article suggests that the answer, at least sometimes, is yes. But in choosing a resistance strategy, journalists should not consider the "take this job and shove it" stance as the only option with moral integrity-or even as the best ethical option. This article develops a model of resistance strategies using the experiences of journalists at one newspaper to illustrate the range of options available for resisting (...)
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  11. Sandra L. Borden (1999). Character as a Safeguard for Journalists Using Case-Based Ethical Reasoning. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (1):93-104.
    As suggested by David E. Boeyink, casuistry is a promising method for making ethical decisions in journalism because its “case-oriented strategy fits [the] general approach” of many journalists while its stress on consistency guards against arbitrariness. Despite its emphasis on consistency, however, casuistry gives self-interested decision makers enough wiggle room to rationalize whatever is expedient. For this reason, casuistry relies also on character. Yet writers who have studied casuistry have said relatively little about the link between character and casuistry and, (...)
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  12. Sandra L. Borden (1998). Avoiding the Pitfalls of Case Studies. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (1):5 – 13.
    C a s e studies have a wide variety of uses in ethics courses,from increasing ethical sensitivity to developing moral reasoning skills. This article focuses on ways to avoid 2 potential pitfalls of using typical case studies: lack of theoretical background and lackof suficient detail. Thefirst part explains how a personal ethics experience can be discussed as early as thefirst day of class in a way that sets the tone and expectations of an ethics course despite students' lack of exposure (...)
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  13. Sandra L. Borden (1997). Book Review: Journalists and Community: A Book Review by Sandra L. Borden. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (3):189 – 192.
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  14. Sandra L. Borden (1995). Gotcha! Deciding When Sources Are Fair Game. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (4):223 – 235.
    This essay examines the issue of questionably obtained information in journalism, defined as information obtained in violation of source expectations. The analysis combines Ross's theory of variable-weight duties and the case-based method of casuistry to specify the duties involved in journalist-source interaction and the sorts of circumstances that may justify weighting these duties differently. A three-part test is offered for determining when journalists have reasonable grounds for occasionally using questionably obtained information. These conservative guidelines for justifying exceptions guard against arbitrary (...)
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  15. Sandra L. Borden (1993). Empathic Listening: The Interviewer's Betrayal. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 8 (4):219 – 226.
    This article argues that empathic listening deceives naive sources into thinking that they will be portrayed favorably in news stories. It suggests that a fair practice of interviewing obligates journalists to obtain informed consent from their sources in advance. Journalists may waive this obligation only when the personal integrity of sources is protected against the pragmatic calculations that tend to prevail in journalism ethics.
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