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Profile: Sandrine Berges (Bilkent University)
  1. Sandrine Berges, Virtue and the Laws: The Parent Analogy in Plato's Crito.
    One noticeable omission in the otherwise ever flourishing literature on Plato's Crito (and one might say on the early Platonic dialogues in general) is the recognition that Plato is presenting a problem from a virtue ethical angle. This is no doubt due to the fact that Aristotle, rather than Plato is regarded as the originator of Virtue Ethics as a branch of philosophy.1 Plato's own contribution to the discipline is more often than not bypassed.2 This has unfortunate consequences not only (...)
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  2. Sandrine Berges, Evil Behaviour and Character: Virtue Ethics Versus Social Psychology.
    Is there such a thing as evil character? Philosophers and social psychologists have cast doubt on the idea that evil behaviour is due to a defect in character formation, which some people have, and some have not. I will argue that their claims are misguided by putting forward the following thesis: evil character traits exist, but they are typically less stable, albeit more prevalent, than good character traits. This is because they typically do not receive the backing of formation, which, (...)
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  3. Sandrine Berges (forthcoming). Is Motherhood Compatible with Political Participation? Sophie de Grouchy's Care-Based Republicanism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    Motherhood, as it is practiced, constitutes an obstacle to gender equality in political participation. Several options are available as a potential solution to this problem. One is to advice women not to become mothers, or if they do, to devote less time and energy to caring for their children. However this will have negative repercussions for those who need to be cared for, whether children, sick people or the elderly. A second solution is to reject the view that political participation (...)
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  4. Sandrine Berges (2013). Mothers and Independent Citizens: Making Sense of Wollstonecraft's Supposed Essentialism. Philosophical Papers 42 (3):259 - 284.
    Mary Wollstonecraft argues that women must be independent citizens, but that they cannot be that unless they fulfill certain duties as mothers. This is problematic in a number of ways, as argued by Laura Brace in a 2000 article. However, I argue that if we understand Wollstonecraft's concept of independence in a republican, rather than a liberal context, and at the same time pay close attention to her discussion of motherhood, a feminist reading of Wollstonecraft is not only possible but (...)
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  5. Sandrine Berges (2013). Routledge Guidebook to Wollstonecraft's A Vindiciation of the Rights of Woman. Routledge.
    Mary Wollstonecraft was one of the greatest philosophers and writers of the Eighteenth century. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book. Her most celebrated and widely-read work is A Vindication of the Rights of Woman . This Guidebook introduces: Wollstonecraft’s life and the background to A Vindication of the Rights of Woman The ideas and text of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (...)
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  6. Sandrine Berges (2013). Rethinking Twelfth Century Ethics: The Contribution of Heloise. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):667-687.
    Twelfth-century ethics is commonly thought of as following a stoic in fl uence rather than an Aristotelian o ne. It is also assumed that these two schools are widely different, in particular with regards to the social aspect of the virtuous life. In this paper I argue that this picture is misleading and that Heloise of Argenteuil recognized that stoic ethics did not entail isolation but could be played out in a social context. I argue that her philosophical contribution does (...)
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  7. Sandrine Berges (2013). Teaching Christine de Pizan in Turkey. Gender and Education 25 (5):595-605.
    An important part of making philosophy as a discipline gender equal is to ensure that female authors are not simply wiped out of the history of philosophy. This has implications for teaching as well as research. In this context, I reflect on my experience of teaching a text by medieval philosopher Christine de Pizan as part of an introductory history of philosophy course taught to Turkish students in law, political science, and international relations. I describe the challenges I encountered, the (...)
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  8. Sandrine Berges (2013). The Impossibility of Perfection. Aristotle, Feminism, and the Complexities of Ethics. By Michael Slote. (New York: Oxford UP, 2011. Pp. Ix + 167. Price £30.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (252):624-626.
  9. Sandrine Berges (2012). Ethics and the Quest for Wisdom. By Robert Kane. (Cambridge UP, 2010. Pp. Ix + 287. Price £50.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):198-199.
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  10. Sandrine Berges (2012). Virtue as Mental Health: A Platonic Defence of the Medical Model in Ethics. Journal of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1).
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  11. Sandrine Berges (2011). Why Women Hug Their Chains: Wollstonecraft and Adaptive Preferences. Utilitas (1):72-87.
    In a recent article, Amartya Sen writes that one important influence on his theory of adaptive preferences is Wollstonecraft's account of how some women, though clearly oppressed, are apparently satisfied with their lot. Wollstonecraft's arguments have received little attention so far from contemporary political philosophers, and one might be tempted to dismiss Sen's acknowledgment as a form of gallantry. That would be wrong. Wollstonecraft does have a lot of interest to say on the topic of why her contemporaries appeared to (...)
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  12. Sandrine Berges (2010). Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume – E.M. Dadlez. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (241):864-865.
  13. Sandrine Berges (2010). Razumijevanje uloge zakonâ u Platonovu "Državniku". Prolegomena 9 (1):5-23.
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  14. Sandrine Berges (2010). Understanding the Role of the Laws in Plato's "Statesman". Prolegomena 9 (1):5-23.
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  15. Sandrine Berges (2009). Plato on Virtue and the Law. Continuum.
     
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  16. Sandrine Berges (2007). Virtue Ethics, Politics, and the Function of Laws: The Parent Analogy in Plato's Menexenus. Dialogue 46 (2):211-230.
    Can virtue ethics say anything worthwhile about laws? What would a virtue-ethical account of good laws look like? I argue that a plausible answer to that question can be found in Plato’s parent analogies in the Crito and the Menexenus. I go on to show that the Menexenus gives us a philosophical argument to the effect that laws are just only if they enable citizens to flourish. I then argue that the resulting virtue-ethical account ofjust laws is not viciously paternalistic. (...)
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  17. Sandrine Berges (2007). Why the Capability Approach is Justified. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):16–25.
  18. Sandrine Berges (2006). The Hardboiled Detective as Moralist : Ethics in Crime Fiction. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    In this paper I want to investigate further a claim made by Martha Nussbaum and Wayne Booth, amongst others, that good literature can be morally valuable, by applying it to a certain kind of genre fiction: the modern harboiled detective novel.
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  19. Sandrine Berges (2005). Loneliness and Belonging: Is Stoic Cosmopolitanism Still Defensible ? [REVIEW] Res Publica 11 (1):3-25.
    In view of recent articles citing the Stoics as a defence or refutation of cosmopolitanism it is legitimate to ask whether the Stoics did in fact have an argument for cosmopolitanism which may be useful to contemporary political philosophers. I begin by discussing an interpretation of Stoic views on cosmopolitanism by Martha Nussbaum and A.A. Long and show that the arguments they attribute to the Stoics are not tenable in the light of present day philosophy. I then argue that the (...)
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  20. Sandrine Berges (2001). Plato, Nietzsche, and Sublimation. Phronimon 3 (1):1-21.
    In this paper I aim to refute the claim that Plato and Nietzsche are at opposite poles regarding the treatment of the non-rational elements of the soul, and argue that, instead, they share a complex and psychologically rich view of the role of reason towards the appetites and the emotions. My argument makes use of the Freudian distinction between sublimation, i.e. the re-channelling of certain undesirable appetitive and emotional forces towards more beneficial ends, and repression. I show that both Plato (...)
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