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  1.  4
    Marc Angenot, Thomas Bloor, Meriel Bloor, Paul Buckley, F. David Peat, Sanford Budick, Wolfgang Iser, A. G. Cairns-Smith, Carmen Rosa Caldas-Coulthard & Malcolm Coulthard (1997). Adam, Jean-Michel; Borel, Marie-Jeanne; Calame, Claude; and Kilani, Mondher, Le Dis-Cours Anthropologique: Description, Narration, Savoir (Nouvelle Edition Revue Et Augmentee)(= Sciences Humaines). Lausanne: Editions Payot Lausanne, 1995. Allert, Beate (Ed.), Languages of Visuality: Crossings Between Science, Art, Politics, and Literature (= Kritik: German Literary Theory and Cultural Studies). Detroit: Wayne State. [REVIEW] Semiotica 115 (3/4):401-404.
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  2.  4
    Sanford Budick (1991). Rembrandt's and Freud's "Gerusalemme Liberata". Social Research 58.
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  3.  5
    Sanford Budick (1988). Rembrandt's Jeremiah. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 51:260-264.
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  4.  14
    Sanford Budick (2010). Kant and Milton. Harvard University Press.
    Kant and Milton: fundamentals and foundations -- Kant's journey in the constellation of German Miltonism: toward the procedure of succession -- Kant's Miltonic transfer to exemplarity: the succession to Milton's "On his blindness" in the groundwork of the Metaphysics of morals -- Kantian tragic form and Kantian "storytelling" -- The Critique of practical reason and Samson agonistes -- Kant's Miltonic procedure of succession in a key moment of the Critique of judgment.
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  5. Sanford Budick (1996). Of the Fragment: In Memory of Yochanan. Common Knowledge 5:118-140.
     
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  6. Sanford Budick (2016). The Function of Kant's Miltonic Citations on a Page of the Opus Postumum. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):76-97.
    On one manuscript page of the Opus postumum Kant twice recurs to a passage from Paradise Lost that, seven years earlier, he had cited to exemplify aesthetic ideas and the concept of succession.1 Now he calls on these same verses to perform an additional function, namely, to represent the a priori idea of a community of reciprocity. For Kant, the “insertion” of this idea serves as an “actus of cognition” that can enable experience of the “subjectively actual”.2In the cited passage (...)
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