Search results for 'Sanford Scribner Ames' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sanford Scribner Ames (1973). Structuralism, Language, and Literature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (1):89-94.score: 870.0
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  2. Edward Scribner Ames (1931). Book Review:The Conquest of Happiness. Bertrand Russell. [REVIEW] Ethics 41 (3):380-.score: 240.0
  3. Edward Scribner Ames (1928). Religion and Morality. International Journal of Ethics 38 (3):295-306.score: 240.0
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  4. Edward Scribner Ames (1931). Book Review:The Biological Basis of Human Nature. H. S. Jennings. [REVIEW] Ethics 41 (4):516-.score: 240.0
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  5. Edward Scribner Ames (1936). Liberalism in Religion. International Journal of Ethics 46 (4):429-443.score: 240.0
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  6. Edward Scribner Ames (1910). The Psychological Basis of Religion. The Monist 20 (2):242-262.score: 240.0
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  7. Edward Scribner Ames (1925). The Religion of Immanuel Kant. The Monist 35 (2):241-247.score: 240.0
  8. Edward Scribner Ames (1931). Humanism. Chicago Literary Club.score: 240.0
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  9. Edward Scribner Ames (1909). Religion and the Psychical Life. International Journal of Ethics 20 (1):48-62.score: 240.0
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  10. Edward Scribner Ames (1922). Religious Values and the Practical Absolute. International Journal of Ethics 32 (4):347-365.score: 240.0
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  11. J. Caleb Clanton & John Gunter (2014). Edward Scribner Ames, Pragmatism, and Religious Naturalism: A Critical Assessment. Heythrop Journal 55 (3):375-390.score: 140.0
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  12. Charner Perry (1958). Edward Scribner Ames. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 32:188 - 189.score: 140.0
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  13. John R. Shook (2007). John Dewey and Edward Scribner Ames: Partners in Religious Naturalism. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 28 (2):178 - 207.score: 140.0
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  14. A. Whitney Sanford (2013). Anand Pandian: Crooked Stalks Cultivating Virtue in South India. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):721-722.score: 60.0
    Anand Pandian: Crooked Stalks Cultivating Virtue in South India Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9308-4 Authors A. Whitney Sanford, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  15. Anthony J. Sanford, Linda M. Moxey & Kevin Paterson (1994). Psychological Studies of Quantifiers. Journal of Semantics 11 (3):153-170.score: 60.0
    In this paper we present a summary review of recent psychological studies which make a contribution to an understanding of how quantifiers are used. Until relatively recently, the contribution which psychology has made has been somewhat restricted. For example, the approach which has enjoyed the greatest popularity in psychology is explaining quantifiers as expressions which have fuzzy or vague projections on to mental scales of amount. Following Moxey & Sanford (1993a), this view is questioned. Experimental work is summarized showing (...)
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  16. David H. Sanford (1988). Begging the Question as Involving Actual Belief and Inconceivable Without It. Metaphilosophy 19 (1):32–37.score: 60.0
    This article answers John Biro's "Knowability, Believability, and Begging the Question: a Reply to Sanford" in "Metaphilosophy" 15 (1984). Biro and I agree that of two argument instances with the same form and content, one but not the other can beg the question, depending on other factors. These factors include actual beliefs, or so I maintain (against Biro) with the help of some analysed examples. Brief selections from Archbishop Whatley and J S Mill suggest that they also regard reference (...)
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  17. Jonathan J. Sanford (ed.) (2012). Spider-Man and Philosophy: The Web of Inquiry. John Wiley & Sons, Inc..score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Part One. The Spectacular Life of Spider-Man? 1. Does Peter Parker Have a Good Life? Neil Mussett 2. What Price Atonement? Peter Parker and the Infinite Debt Taneli Kukkonen "My Name is Peter Parker": Unmasking the Right and the Good Mark D. White Part Two. Responsibility-Man 4. "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility": Spider-Man, Christian Ethics, and the Problem of Evil Adam Barkman 5. Does Great Power Bring Great Responsibility? Spider-Man and the Good Samaritan J. (...)
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  18. S. B. Barton & A. J. Sanford (1990). The Control of Attributional Patterns by the Focusing Properties of Quantifying Expressions. Journal of Semantics 7 (1):81-92.score: 60.0
    Recent evidence has shown that certain quantifiers (few, only a few) and quantifying adverbs (seldom, rarely) when used tend to make people think of reasons for the small proportions or low frequencies which they denote. Other expressions single out small proportions or low frequences, but do not lead to a focus on reasons (e. g. a few; occasionally). In the present paper, these observations are applied to the attribution of cause in short two–line vignettes which make reference to situations, and (...)
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  19. Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall (2003). Dao De Jing: Making This Life Significant: A Philosophical Translation. Ballantine Books.score: 60.0
    Composed more than 2,000 years ago during a turbulent period of Chinese history, the Dao de jing set forth an alternative vision of reality in a world torn apart by violence and betrayal. Daoism, as this subtle but enduring philosophy came to be known, offers a comprehensive view of experience grounded in a full understanding of the wonders hidden in the ordinary. Now in this luminous new translation, based on the recently discovered ancient bamboo scrolls, China scholars Roger T. (...) and David L. Hall bring the timeless wisdom of the Dao de jing into our contemporary world. Though attributed to Laozi, “the Old Master,” the Dao de jing is, in fact, of unknown authorship and may well have originated in an oral tradition four hundred years before the time of Christ. Eschewing philosophical dogma, the Dao de jing set forth a series of maxims that outlined a new perspective on reality and invited readers to embark on a regimen of self-cultivation. In the Daoist world view, each particular element in our experience sends out an endless series of ripples throughout the cosmos. The unstated goal of the Dao de jing is self-transformation–the attainment of personal excellence that flows from the world and back into it. Responding to the teachings of Confucius, the Dao de jing revitalizes moral behavior by recommending a spontaneity made possible by the cultivated “habits” of the individual. In this elegant volume, Ames and Hall feature the original Chinese texts of the Dao de jing and translate them into crisp, chiseled English that reads like poetry. Each of the eighty-one brief chapters is followed by clear, thought-provoking commentary exploring the layers of meaning in the text. The book’s extensive introduction is a model of accessible scholarship in which Ames and Hall consider the origin of the text, place the emergence of Daoist philosophy in its historical and political context, and outline its central tenets. The Dao de jing is a work of timeless wisdom and beauty, as vital today as it was in ancient China. This new version will stand as both a compelling introduction to the complexities of Daoist thought and as the classic modern English translation. (shrink)
     
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  20. A. J. Sanford, S. Garrod, A. Lucas & R. Henderson (1983). Pronouns Without Explicit Antecedents? Journal of Semantics 2 (3-4):303-318.score: 60.0
    Yule (1982) has argued that examples from speech show that pronouns may be interpreted nonreferentially. In the present paper, it is argued that pronouns elicit procedures for the identification of referents which are in explicit focus (Sanford and Garrod, 1981). Three experiments are offered in support of this view. The discussion centres on the need for carefully assessing the knowledge-states of listeners when pronouns are used in the absence of antecedents. It is proposed that felicitous use of pronouns without (...)
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  21. Frederick Kirschenmann (2013). A. Whitney Sanford: Growing Stories From India: Religion and the Fate of Agriculture. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):165-167.score: 54.0
    A. Whitney Sanford: Growing Stories from India: Religion and the Fate of Agriculture Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s10806-012-9394-y Authors Frederick Kirschenmann, Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Iowa State University, Ames, LA, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  22. David H. Sanford (1978). Causal Necessity and Logical Necessity. Philosophical Studies 33 (2):185 - 194.score: 30.0
    Hume's arguments for the contention that causal necessity precludes logical necessity depend on the questionable principle that a cause must precede its effect. Hobbes' definition of entire cause, although it fails to account for causal priority, is not refuted by Hume. The objections of Myles Brand and Marshall Swain (Philosophical Studies, 1976) to my counterexample against Hume (Philosophical Studies, 1975) are ineffective. Their other objections to my criticisms of their argument against defining causation in terms of necessary and sufficient conditions (...)
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  23. David H. Sanford (1975). Causal Necessity and Logical Necessity. Philosophical Studies 28 (2):185 - 194.score: 30.0
    Myles Brand and Marshall Swain advocate the principle that if A is the set of conditions individually necessary and jointly sufficient for the occurrence of B, then if C is a set of conditions individually necessary for the occurrence of B, every member of C is a member of A. I agree with John Barker and Risto Hilpinen who each argue that this principle is not true for causal necessity and sufficiency, but I disagree with their claim that it is (...)
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  24. D. H. Sanford (2011). Can a Sum Change its Parts? Analysis 71 (2):235-239.score: 30.0
    I consider two logically independent definitions of (mereological) sum identity when x is a sum of the ys and w is a sum of the zs. Def 1 x=y: every part of every y shares a part with some z, and every part of every z shares a part with some y. Def 2 x = y: all the ys are zs, and all the zs are ys. Neither allows a sum to change its parts. Peter van Inwagen tells a (...)
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  25. David H. Sanford (1993). The Problem of the Many, Many Composition Questions, and Naive Mereology. Noûs 27 (2):219-228.score: 30.0
    Naive mereology studies ordinary, common-sense beliefs about part and whole. Some of the speculations in this article on naive mereology do not bear directly on Peter van Inwagen's "Material Beings". The other topics, (1) and (2), both do. (1) Here is an example of Peter Unger's "Problem of the Many". How can a table be a collection of atoms when many collections of atoms have equally strong claims to be that table? Van Inwagen invokes fuzzy sets to solve this problem. (...)
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  26. Roger T. Ames (2008). Using English to Speak Confucianism: Antonio S. Cua on the Confucian "Self". Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):33–41.score: 30.0
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  27. David H. Sanford (1976). The Primary Objects of Perception. Mind 85 (April):189-208.score: 30.0
    The primary objects of hearing are sounds: everything we hear we hear by hearing a sound. (This claim differs from Berkeley’s that we hear only sounds and from Aristotle’s that we only hear sounds.) Colored regions are primary objects of sight, and pressure resistant regions are primary objects of perception by touch. By definition, the primary objects of perception are physical. The properties of the primary objects of perception are exactly the properties sense-datum theories attribute to sense-data. Indirect Realism holds (...)
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  28. William L. Ames (1982). The Notion of Svabhāva in the Thought of Candrakīrti. Journal of Indian Philosophy 10 (2):161-177.score: 30.0
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  29. William L. Ames (1993). Bhāvaviveka's Prajñāpradīpa. Journal of Indian Philosophy 21 (3):209-259.score: 30.0
  30. José Luiz Ames (2009). Liberdade e conflito: o confronto dos desejos como fundamento da ideia de liberdade em Maquiavel. Kriterion 50 (119):179-196.score: 30.0
  31. Henry Rosemont & Roger T. Ames (2008). Family Reverence ( Xiao) as the Source of Consummatory Conduct ( Ren 仁). Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):9-19.score: 30.0
  32. Roger T. Ames (1983). Is Political Taoism Anarchism? Journal of Chinese Philosophy 10 (1):27-47.score: 30.0
  33. David H. Sanford, Determinates Vs. Determinables. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    Everything red is colored, and all squares are polygons. A square is distinguished from other polygons by being four-sided, equilateral, and equiangular. What distinguishes red things from other colored things? This has been understood as a conceptual rather than scientific question. Theories of wavelengths and reflectance and sensory processing are not considered. Given just our ordinary understanding of color, it seems that what differentiates red from other colors is only redness itself. The Cambridge logician W. E. Johnson introduced the terms (...)
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  34. David H. Sanford (1981). Illusions and Sense-Data. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 6 (1):371-385.score: 30.0
    Examples of sensory illusion show the failure of the attempt of traditional sense-datum theory to account for something's phenomenally appearing to be F by postulating the existence of a sense-datum that is actually F. the Muller-Lyer Illusion cannot be explained by postulating two sensibly presented lines that actually have the lengths the physical lines appear to have. Illusions due to color contrast cannot be explained by postulating sense-data that actually have the colors the physical samples appear to have.
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  35. David H. Sanford (2003). Fusion Confusion. Analysis 63 (277):1–4.score: 30.0
    Two fusions can be in the same place at the same time. So long as a house made of Tinkertoys is intact, the fusion of all its Tinkertoys parts coincides with the fusion of it walls and its roof. If none of the Tinkertoys is destroyed, their fusion persists through the complete disassembly of the house. (So the house is not a fusion of its Tinkertoy parts.) The fusion of the walls and roof does not persist through the complete disassembly (...)
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  36. David H. Sanford (1981). Knowledge and Relevant Alternatives: Comments on Dretske. Philosophical Studies 40 (3):379 - 388.score: 30.0
    Fred Dretske holds that if one knows something, one need not eliminate every alternative to it but only the relevant alternatives. Besides defending this view in "The Pragmatic Dimension of Knowledge" ("Phil. Stud.", 40, 363-378, n 81), he makes some tentative suggestions about determining when an alternative is relevant. I discuss these suggestions and conclude that there are problems yet to be solved. I do not conclude that there are insoluble problems or that Dretske's approach is on the wrong track. (...)
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  37. Roger T. Ames (1986). Taoism and the Nature of Nature. Environmental Ethics 8 (4):317-350.score: 30.0
    The problems of environmental ethics are so basic that the exploration of an alternative metaphysics or attendant ethical theory is not a sufficiently radical solution. In fact, the assumptions entailed in adefinition of systematic philosophy that gives us a tradition of metaphysics might themselves be the source of the current crisis. We might need to revision the responsibilities of the philosopher and think in terms of the artist rather than the “scientific of first principles.” Taoism proceeds from art rather than (...)
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  38. David H. Sanford (1970). Locke, Leibniz, and Wiggins on Being in the Same Place at the Same Time. Philosophical Review 79 (1):75-82.score: 30.0
    Locke thought it was a necessary truth that no two material bodies could be in the same place at the same time. Leibniz wasn't so sure. This paper sides with Leibniz. I examine the arguments of David Wiggins in defense of Locke on this point (Philosophical Review, January 1968). Wiggins’ arguments are ineffective.
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  39. Roger T. Ames (1981). Wu-Wei in "the Art of Rulership" Chapter of Huai Nan Tzu: Its Sources and Philosophical Orientation. Philosophy East and West 31 (2):193-213.score: 30.0
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  40. Van Meter Ames (1970). The Chicago Pragmatists. Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (4).score: 30.0
  41. Roger Ames, Robert C. Solomon & Joel Marks (eds.) (1995). Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy. SUNY Press.score: 30.0
    This book broadens the inquiry into emotion to comprehend a comparative cultural outlook. It begins with an overview of recent work in the West, and then proceeds to the main business of scrutinizing various relevant issues from both Asian and comparative perspectives. Original essays by experts in the field. Finally, Robert Solomon comments and summarizes.
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  42. David H. Sanford (2005). Distinctness and Non-Identity. Analysis 65 (288):269–274.score: 30.0
    The following statement (A) is usually abbreviated with symbols: (A) There are items X and Y, each is F, X is not identical to Y, and everything F is identical to X or is identical to Y. (A) is neither necessary nor sufficient for the existence of exactly two distinct things that are F. Some things are neither identical nor distinct. The difference between distinctness and nonidentity makes a difference in asking questions about counting, constitution, and persistence.
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  43. Roger T. Ames (2002). Remembering David Hall: David L. Hall (1937-2001). Philosophy East and West 52 (3):277-280.score: 30.0
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  44. Roger T. Ames (1984). The Meaning of Body in Classical Chinese Thought. International Philosophical Quarterly 24 (1):39-54.score: 30.0
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  45. David H. Sanford (1975). Infinity and Vagueness. Philosophical Review 84 (4):520-535.score: 30.0
    Many philosophic arguments concerned with infinite series depend on the mutual inconsistency of statements of the following five forms: (1) something exists which has R to something; (2) R is asymmetric; (3) R is transitive; (4) for any x which has R to something, there is something which has R to x; (5) only finitely many things are related by R. Such arguments are suspect if the two-place relation R in question involves any conceptual vagueness or inexactness. Traditional sorites arguments (...)
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  46. Jonathan J. Sanford (2002). Scheler on Feeling and Values. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 76:165-181.score: 30.0
    Max Scheler argues that there is much to learn about reality through faculties that lie beyond the boundary of reason. In his Formalism in Ethics and Non-Formal Ethics of Values, Scheler explores values (Werte), awareness of which depends primarily on affective receptivity rather than rational perceptionof the world. This essay explores the possibility of affective insight in light of Scheler’s analysis of values. Scheler’s notion of values as moral facts is first examined, next consideration is given to how we learn (...)
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  47. William L. Ames (1986). Buddhapālita's Exposition of the Madhyamaka. Journal of Indian Philosophy 14 (4):313-348.score: 30.0
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  48. Werner Menski, Carl Olson, William Cenkner, Anne E. Monius, Sarah Hodges, Jeffrey J. Kripal, Carol Salomon, Deepak Sarma, William Cenkner, John E. Cort, Peter A. Huff, Joseph A. Bracken, Larry D. Shinn, Jonathan S. Walters, Ellison Banks Findly, John Grimes, Loriliai Biernacki, David L. Gosling, Thomas Forsthoefel, Michael H. Fisher, Ian Barrow, Srimati Basu, Natalie Gummer, Pradip Bhattacharya, John Grimes, Heather T. Frazer, Elaine Craddock, Andrea Pinkney, Joseph Schaller, Michael W. Myers, Lise F. Vail, Wayne Howard, Bradley B. Burroughs, Shalva Weil, Joseph A. Bracken, Christopher W. Gowans, Dan Cozort, Katherine Janiec Jones, Carl Olson, M. D. McLean, A. Whitney Sanford, Sarah Lamb, Eliza F. Kent, Ashley Dawson, Amir Hussain, John Powers, Jennifer B. Saunders & Ramdas Lamb (2005). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 9 (1-3):153-228.score: 30.0
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  49. Jonathan J. Sanford (2010). Are You Man Enough? Aristotle and Courage. International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):431-445.score: 30.0
    There are four features to Aristotle’s account of courage that appear peculiar when compared to our own intuitions about this virtue: (1) his account of courage seems not, on its surface, to fit a eudaimonist model, (2) courage is restricted to a surprisingly small number of actions, (3) this restriction, among other things, excludes women and non-combatant men from ever exercising this virtue, and (4) courage is counted as virtuous because of its nobility and beauty. In this paper I explore (...)
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  50. David H. Sanford (1993). Disjunctive Predicates. American Philosophical Quarterly 30 (2):167-1722.score: 30.0
    Philosophers have had difficulty in explaining the difference between disjunctive and non-disjunctive predicates. Purely syntactical criteria are ineffective, and mention of resemblance begs the question. I draw the distinction by reference to relations between borderline cases. The crucial point about the disjoint predicate 'red or green', for example, is that no borderline case of 'red' is a borderline case of 'green'. Other varieties of disjunctive predicates are: inclusively disjunctive (such as 'red or hard'), disconnected (such as 'grue' on the usual (...)
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