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  1. Sara A. Morris (2009). Corporate Targets of Shareholder Resolutions. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:36-46.
    This study examines social issues shareholder resolutions filed at S&P 500 companies in 2007. These firms received 86% of all social issues resolutions filed. Findings indicate that green resolutions were the most common single type (30% of social issues resolutions), but nearly one third (32%) of resolutions contained non-traditional content. Firms were more likely to be targeted if they were large in size and demonstrated poor treatment of employees and customers. As might be expected, the primary sponsors of social issues (...)
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  2. Sara A. Morris (2005). Corporate Social Performance in Family Firms. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:154-159.
    This is an exploratory study of corporate social performance in firms with family members in executive, governance, or strong ownership positions. Family firmsdominate the economy in most countries, including the United States, and families are thought to be more concerned with personal wealth creation and risk avoidance than social performance. Although such firms have been shown to have superior financial performance, I found no evidence of superior (or inferior) social performance among family firms in the S&P 500. In a departure (...)
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  3. Bruce Seifert, Sara A. Morris & Barbara R. Bartkus (2004). Having, Giving, and Getting: Slack Resources, Corporate Philanthropy, and Firm Financial Performance. Business and Society 43 (2):135-161.
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  4. Bruce Seifert, Sara A. Morris, Barbara R. Bartkus, Mark P. Sharfman, Teresa M. Shaft & Laszlo Tihanyi (2004). Smith, Wanda J., Richard E. Wokutch, K. Vernard Harrington, And. Business and Society 43 (4):437-439.
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  5. Bruce Seifert, Sara A. Morris & Barbara R. Bartkus (2003). Comparing Big Givers and Small Givers: Financial Correlates of Corporate Philanthropy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):195 - 211.
    In a departure from the traditional studies of corporate philanthropy that focus on board composition, advertising, and social networks, the authors investigate the financial correlates of corporate philanthropy. The research design controls for firm size and industry while observing firms from a variety of industries. The sample contains matched pairs of generous and less generous corporate givers. The authors find, as hypothesized, a positive relationship between a firm''s cash resources available and cash donations, but no significant relationship between corporate philanthropy (...)
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  6. Barbara R. Bartkus, Sara A. Morris & Bruce Seifert (2002). Governance and Corporate Philanthropy Restraining Robin Hood? Business and Society 41 (3):319-344.
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  7. Sara A. Morris (1997). Internal Effects of Stakeholder Management Devices. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (4):413-424.
    Stakeholder management devices (SMDs) are the mechanisms through which organizations respond to stakeholder concerns. Given that SMDs serve as organizational control systems for employees and managers, this research investigates the internal rather than the external effects of a firm's SMDs. Unlike most previous research, I examined the effects of these formal structures, processes, and procedures in the aggregate, rather than focusing attention on a single type of device. The study investigates the effects of a firm's stakeholder management devices, in the (...)
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  8. Sara A. Morris (1996). Managers' Attitudes About Firm Responsibilities. International Journal of Value-Based Management 9 (1):63-75.
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  9. Sara A. Morris & Robert A. McDonald (1995). The Role of Moral Intensity in Moral Judgments: An Empirical Investigation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (9):715 - 726.
    Jones (1991) has proposed an issue-contingent model of ethical decision making by individuals in organizations. The distinguishing feature of the issue was identified as its moral intensity, which determines the moral imperative in the situation. In this study, we adapted three scenarios from the literature in order to examine the issue-contingent model. Findings, based on a student sample, suggest that (1) the perceived and actual dimensions of moral intensity often differed; (2) perceived moral intensity variables, in the aggregate, significantly affected (...)
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  10. Sara A. Morris, Kathleen A. Rehbein, Jamshid C. Hosselni & Robert L. Armacost (1995). A Test of Environmental, Situational, and Personal Influences on the Ethical Intentions of CEOs. Business and Society 34 (2):119-146.
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