Search results for 'Sarah B. Drivdahl' (try it on Scholar)

  1. Daniel T. Levin, Nausheen Momen, Sarah B. Drivdahl & Daniel J. Simons (2000). Change Blindness Blindness: The Metacognitive Error of Overestimating Change-Detection Ability. Visual Cognition 7 (1):397-412.score: 870.0
  2. Daniel T. Levin, Sarah B. Drivdahl, Nausheen Momen & Melissa R. Beck (2002). False Predictions About the Detectability of Visual Changes: The Role of Beliefs About Attention, Memory, and the Continuity of Attended Objects in Causing Change Blindness Blindness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):507-527.score: 870.0
    Recently, a number of experiments have emphasized the degree to which subjects fail to detect large changes in visual scenes. This finding, referred to as “change blindness,” is often considered surprising because many people have the intuition that such changes should be easy to detect. Levin, Momen, Drivdahl, and Simons documented this intuition by showing that the majority of subjects believe they would notice changes that are actually very rarely detected. Thus subjects exhibit a metacognitive error we refer to (...)
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  3. D. T. Levin, S. B. Drivdahl, N. Momen & M. R. Beck (2002). False Predictions About the Detectability of Unexpected Visual Changes: The Role of Metamemory and Beliefs About Attention in Causing Change Blindness Blindness. Consciousness and Cognition 11:507-527.score: 240.0
     
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