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Sarah Conly [23]Sarah O'brien Conly [1]
  1.  44
    Sarah Conly (2012). Against Autonomy: Justifying Coercive Paternalism. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Why value autonomy?; 2. Individuality; 3. Alienation, authenticity, and affect; 4. Misuse and abuse: perfectionism and preferences; 5. Misuse and abuse: punishment and privacy; 6. Applications; 7. Final justifications.
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  2. Sarah Conly (2013). Coercive Paternalism in Health Care: Against Freedom of Choice. Public Health Ethics 6 (3):pht025.
    I argue that it can be morally permissible to coerce people into doing what is good for their own health. I discuss recent initiatives in New York City that are designed to take away certain unhealthy options from local citizens, and argue that this does not impose on them in unjustifiable ways. Good paternalistic measures are designed to promote people's long-term goals, and to prevent them from making short-term decisions that interfere with reaching those, and New York's attempts to ban (...)
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  3.  10
    Sarah Conly (2016). The Right to Preventive Health Care. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):307-321.
    The right to health care is a right to care that is not too costly to the provider, considering the benefits it conveys, and is effective in bringing about the level of health needed for a good human life, not necessarily the best health possible. These considerations suggest that, where possible, society has an obligation to provide preventive health care, which is both low cost and effective, and that health care regulations should promote citizens’ engagement in reasonable preventive health care (...)
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  4. Sarah Conly (2012). Against Autonomy: Justifying Coercive Paternalism. Cambridge University Press.
    Since Mill's seminal work On Liberty, philosophers and political theorists have accepted that we should respect the decisions of individual agents when those decisions affect no one other than themselves. Indeed, to respect autonomy is often understood to be the chief way to bear witness to the intrinsic value of persons. In this book, Sarah Conly rejects the idea of autonomy as inviolable. Drawing on sources from behavioural economics and social psychology, she argues that we are so often irrational in (...)
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  5.  93
    Sarah Conly (1983). Utilitarianism and Integrity. The Monist 66 (2):298-311.
  6. Sarah Conly (2004). Seduction, Rape, and Coercion. Ethics 115 (1):96-121.
    In Tess of the d’Urbervilles, the innocent Tess is the object of Alec d’Urberville’s dishonorable intentions. Alec uses every wile he can think of to seduce the poor and ignorant Tess, who works keeping hens in his mother’s house: he flatters her, he impresses her with a show of wealth, he gives help to her family to win her gratitude, and he reacts with irritation and indignation when she nonetheless continues to repulse his advances, causing her to feel shame at (...)
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  7.  34
    Sarah Conly (1988). Flourishing and the Failure of the Ethics of Virtue. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):83-96.
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  8.  62
    Sarah Conly (2005). The Right to Procreation: Merits and Limits. American Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):105 - 115.
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  9.  25
    Sarah Conly (2001). Why Feminists Should Oppose Feminist Virtue Ethics. Philosophy Now 33:12-14.
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  10.  16
    Sarah Conly (1999). Can a Life of Child-Rearing Be Meaningful? Philosophy Now 24:24-24.
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  11.  2
    Sarah Conly (2016). Withdrawing, Withholding, and Freedom. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (7):18-19.
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  12.  11
    Sarah Conly (2014). Response to Resnik. Public Health Ethics 7 (2):178-179.
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  13.  1
    Sarah Conly & James D. Wallace (1991). Moral Relevance and Moral Conflict. Philosophical Review 100 (4):670.
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  14.  1
    Sarah Conly & Peter A. French (1982). The Scope of Morality. Philosophical Review 91 (3):457.
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  15.  4
    Sarah Conly (2015). Ethics 1965–90. Ethics 125 (4):1114-1118.
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  16.  17
    Sarah Conly (1985). The Objectivity of Morals and the Subjectivity of Agents. American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (4):275 - 286.
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  17.  1
    Sarah Conly (2016). Government Paternalism: Nanny State or Helpful Friend? Julian Le Grand and Bill New. Princeton University Press, 2015, Ix + 202 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 32 (1):156-162.
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  18.  4
    Sarah Conly (2014). The Voice of the State. Res Publica 20 (1):105-109.
    This is a really good book. Brettschneider’s When the State Speaks is both provocative and persuasive, resolving a stubborn conflict within democratic theory in a way many will initially reject, but which he argues for so effectively that, by the end, the controversial appears the commonsensical.The problem Brettschneider addresses is one with which we are all familiar. In democracies we believe in the right to free speech. We believe that this right is implied by the underlying principles of democracy, and (...)
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  19.  2
    Sarah Conly (2008). Is Starbuck a Woman? In Jason T. Eberl (ed.), Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There. Wiley-Blackwell 230--240.
  20.  6
    Sarah Conly (2009). Review of Helen Small, The Long Life. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).
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  21. Sarah Conly & Michael Slote (1986). Goods and Virtues. Philosophical Review 95 (1):147.
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  22. Sarah Conly (forthcoming). In Defense of the Invasive State Discussion of Brettschneider’s When the State Speaks, What Should It Say? Philosophy and Public Issues – Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  23. Sarah Conly (2016). One Child: Do We Have a Right to More? Oxford University Press Usa.
    A compelling argument for the morality of limitations on procreation in lessening the harmful environmental effects of unchecked populationWe live in a world where a burgeoning global population has started to have a major and destructive environmental impact. The results, including climate change and the struggle for limited resources, appear to be inevitable aspects of a difficult future. Mandatory population control might be a possible last resort to combat this problem, but is also a potentially immoral and undesirable violation of (...)
     
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