Search results for 'Sarah K. Miraglia' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  47
    Linda Martín Alcoff & Sarah K. Miraglia, Is Sarah Palin a Feminist?
    We have been teaching gender issues and feminist theory for many years, and we know that there is certainly a diversity of views among women, and men, about what counts as feminist or as good for women. Some may see a competent woman running for V.P as inevitably a step forward for women's equality. But consider this.
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  2. E. G. K. Lopez-Escobar & Francisco Miraglia (1999). Intuitionistic Equivalence. Manuscrito 22 (2):205.
     
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  3. Ross Nehm (2015). Karl S. Rosengren, Sarah K. Brem, E. Margaret Evans, and Gale M. Sinatra : Evolution Challenges: Integrating Research and Practice in Teaching and Learning About Evolution. [REVIEW] Science and Education 24 (4):481-485.
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  4.  3
    Logan E. Whalen (2011). K. Sarah-Jane Murray, From Plato to Lancelot: A Preface to Chrétien de Troyes. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2008. Pp. Xxii, 317; 11 Black-and-White Illustrations. $26.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (1):248-250.
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  5.  17
    Alastair Hamilton (2007). Malleus Maleficarum. By Henricus Institoris, O. P. And Jacobus Sprenger, O. P. Edited and Translated by Christopher S. MacKay, Heresy, Magic, and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe. By Gary K. Waite and Demonic Possession and Exorcism in Early Modern France. By Sarah Ferber. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (3):477–479.
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  6.  10
    Eric Racine, Sarah Waldman, Nicole Palmour, David Risse & Judy Illes (2007). “Currents of Hope”: Neurostimulation Techniques in U.S. And U.K. Print Media. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (3):312-316.
    The application of neurostimulation techniques such as deep brain stimulation —often called a brain pacemaker for neurological conditions like Parkinson's disease —has generated “currents of hope.” Building on this hope, there is significant interest in applying neurostimulation to psychiatric disorders such as major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. These emerging neurosurgical practices raise a number of important ethical and social questions in matters of resource allocation, informed consent for vulnerable populations, and commercialization of research.
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  7.  6
    Sarah Marusek (2013). Vijay K. Bhatia, Christoph A. Hafner, Lindsay Miller, and Anne Wagner (Eds): Diverse Discursive Contextualizations of Audience, Place, and Power in Legal Communication. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (3):711-714.
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  8.  4
    Jack K. Horner, Second Thoughts On Sarah's First Signs.
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  9.  4
    Jana K. Schulman (2004). Sarah M. Anderson, Ed., with Karen Swenson, Cold Counsel: Women in Old Norse Literature and Mythology. New York and London: Routledge, 2002. Pp. Xvi, 304; Black-and-White Frontispiece, Black-and-White Figures, and 1 Map. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (2):444-446.
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  10.  3
    Sarah Ekdawi (2008). Byzantine and Modern Greek (W.W.) Reader and (K.) Taylor Trs. Kostas Karyotakis: Battered Guitars. Poems and Prose. (Birmingham Modern Greek Translations 6). Birmingham: Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies, 2006. Pp. Xix + 220. £11.99. 9780704425194. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:290-.
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  11. Matthew J. C. Crump, Elisabeth Bacon, Kylie J. Barnett, Paolo Bartolomeo, Melissa R. Beck, Jesse J. Bengson, Derek Besner, Victoria Bird, Sylvie Blairy & Sarah-Jayne Blakemore (2007). Cosmelli, Diego, 623 Costantini, Marcello, 229 Cressman, Erin K., 265. Consciousness and Cognition 16:1005-1006.
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  12. Sarah Mattice (2015). Landscape and Travelling East and West: A Philosophical Journey Ed. By Hans-Georg Moeller, Andrew K. Whitehead. Philosophy East and West 65 (3):988-991.
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  13. Sarah K. Paul (2015). Doxastic Self-Control. American Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):145-58.
    Discusses the possibility of autonomy in our epistemic lives, and the importance of the concept of the first person in weathering fluctuations in our epistemic perspective over time.
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  14. Sarah K. Paul (2015). The Courage of Conviction. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (5-6):1-23.
    Is there a sense in which we exercise direct volitional control over our beliefs? Most agree that there is not, but discussions tend to focus on control in forming a belief. The focus here is on sustaining a belief over time in the face of ‘epistemic temptation’ to abandon it. It is argued that we do have a capacity for ‘doxastic self-control’ over time that is partly volitional in nature, and that its exercise is rationally permissible.
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  15.  6
    Sarah K. Robins (2016). Misremembering. Philosophical Psychology 29 (3):432-447.
    The Archival and Constructive views of memory offer contrasting characterizations of remembering and its relation to memory errors. I evaluate the descriptive adequacy of each by offering a close analysis of one of the most prominent experimental techniques by which memory errors are elicited—the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm. Explaining the DRM effect requires appreciating it as a distinct form of memory error, which I refer to as misremembering. Misremembering is a memory error that relies on successful retention of the targeted event. It (...)
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  16. Sarah K. Paul (2012). How We Know What We Intend. Philosophical Studies 161 (2):327-346.
    How do we know what our intentions are? It is argued that work on self-knowledge has tended to neglect the attitude of intention, and that an epistemological account is needed that is attuned to the specific features of that state. Richard Moran’s Authorship view, on which we can acquire self-knowledge by making up our minds, offers a promising insight for such an account: we do not normally discover what we intend through introspection. However, his formulation of the Authorship view, developed (...)
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  17. Sarah K. Paul (2009). How We Know What We're Doing. Philosophers' Imprint 9 (11):1-24.
    G.E.M. Anscombe famously claimed that acting intentionally entails knowing "without observation" what one is doing. Among those that have taken her claim seriously, an influential response has been to suppose that in order to explain this fact, we should conclude that intentions are a species of belief. This paper argues that there are good reasons to reject this "cognitivist" view of intention in favor of the view that intentions are distinctively practical attitudes that are not beliefs and do not constitutively (...)
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  18.  37
    Sarah K. Paul (2014). The Transparency of Mind. Philosophy Compass 9 (5):295-303.
    In philosophical inquiry into the mind, the metaphor of ‘transparency’ has been attractive to many who are otherwise in deep disagreement. It has thereby come to have a variety of different and mutually incompatible connotations. The mind is said to be transparent to itself, our perceptual experiences are said to be transparent to the world, and our beliefs are said to be transparent to – a great many different things. The first goal of this essay is to sort out the (...)
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  19. Sarah K. Paul (2011). Deviant Formal Causation. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 5 (3).
    What is the role of practical thought in determining the intentional action that is performed? Donald Davidson’s influential answer to this question is that thought plays an efficient-causal role: intentional actions are those events that have the correct causal pedigree in the agent's beliefs and desires. But the Causal Theory of Action has always been plagued with the problem of “deviant causal chains,” in which the right action is caused by the right mental state but in the wrong way. This (...)
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  20.  62
    Sarah K. Paul (2015). The Transparency of Intention. Philosophical Studies 172 (6):1529-1548.
    The attitude of intention is not usually the primary focus in philosophical work on self-knowledge. A recent exception is the so-called “Transparency” theory of self-knowledge, which attempts to explain how we know our own minds by appeal to reflection on non-mental facts. Transparency theories are attractive in light of their relative psychological economy compared to views that must posit a dedicated mechanism of ‘inner sense’. However, it is argued here, focusing on proposals by Richard Moran and Alex Byrne, that the (...)
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  21.  47
    Sarah K. Brem, Michael Ranney & Jennifer Schindel (2003). Perceived Consequences of Evolution: College Students Perceive Negative Personal and Social Impact in Evolutionary Theory. Science Education 87 (2):181-206.
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  22. Sarah K. Paul (2009). Intention, Belief, and Wishful Thinking: Setiya on “Practical Knowledge”. Ethics 119 (3):546-557.
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  23. Sarah K. Paul (2014). Embarking on a Crime. In Enrique Villanueva V. (ed.), Law and the Philosophy of Action. Rodopi 101-24.
    When we define something as a crime, we generally thereby criminalize the attempt to commit that crime. However, it is a vexing puzzle to specify what must be the case in order for a criminal attempt to have occurred, given that the results element of the crime fails to come about. I argue that the philosophy of action can assist the criminal law in clarifying what kinds of events are properly categorized as criminal attempts. A natural thought is that this (...)
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  24.  36
    Sarah K. Paul (2011). Willing, Wanting, Waiting, by Richard Holton. Mind 120 (479):889-892.
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  25. Sarah K. Robins & Carl F. Craver (2009). Biological Clocks: Explaining with Models of Mechanisms. In John Bickle (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press 41--67.
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  26.  37
    Sarah K. Paul (2015). Rational and Social Agency: The Philosophy of Michael Bratman. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 3 (43).
  27.  28
    Sarah K. Paul (2014). Diachronic Incontinence is a Problem in Moral Philosophy. Inquiry 57 (3):337-355.
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  28.  42
    Sarah K. Paul (2013). The Conclusion of Practical Reasoning: The Shadow Between Idea and Act. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):287-302.
    There is a puzzle about how to understand the conclusion of a successful instance of practical reasoning. Do the considerations adduced in reasoning rationalize the particular doing of an action, as Aristotle is sometimes interpreted as claiming? Or does reasoning conclude in the formation of an attitude – an intention, say – that has an action-type as its content? This paper attempts to clarify what is at stake in that debate and defends the latter view against some of its critics.
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  29.  69
    Carl F. Craver & Sarah K. Robins (2011). No Nonsense Neuro-Law. Neuroethics 4 (3):195-203.
    In Minds, Brains, and Norms, Pardo and Patterson deny that the activities of persons (knowledge, rule-following, interpretation) can be understood exclusively in terms of the brain, and thus conclude that neuroscience is irrelevant to the law, and to the conceptual and philosophical questions that arise in legal contexts. On their view, such appeals to neuroscience are an exercise in nonsense. We agree that understanding persons requires more than understanding brains, but we deny their pessimistic conclusion. Whether neuroscience can be used (...)
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  30.  6
    Sarah K. Brem & Lance J. Rips (2000). Explanation and Evidence in Informal Argument. Cognitive Science 24 (4):573-604.
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  31.  97
    Sarah K. Paul, Intention. International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
    A survey of the notion of intention as it relates to debates in the philosophy of action, moral psychology, and ethics.
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  32.  4
    Sarah K. Robins (2016). Optogenetics and the Mechanism of False Memory. Synthese 193 (5):1561-1583.
    Constructivists about memory argue that memory is a capacity for building representations of past events from a generalized information store. The view is motivated by the memory errors discovered in cognitive psychology. Little has been known about the neural mechanisms by which false memories are produced. Recently, using a method I call the Optogenetic False Memory Technique, neuroscientists have created false memories in mice. In this paper, I examine how Constructivism fares in light of O-FaMe results. My aims are two-fold. (...)
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  33.  1
    Sarah K. Marusek (2007). Between Disability and Terror: Handicapped Parking Space and Homeland Security at Fenway Park. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 20 (3):251-261.
    In the United States, handicapped parking spaces tether the social construction of need to the legal assurance of equality of accessibility. However in places such as Fenway Park in Boston, the threat of terror distorts the intention of these spaces by politically reconfiguring their presence and meaning. As a result, our public interest is legally manipulated and socially challenged to preference the abstraction of threat over real life in even the most ordinary of places.
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  34.  55
    Sarah K. Paul & Jennifer M. Morton (2014). Of Reasons and Recognition. Analysis 74 (2):339-348.
  35.  5
    Anca M. Miron, Sarah K. Parkinson & Jack W. Brehm (2007). Does Happiness Function Like a Motivational State? Cognition and Emotion 21 (2):248-267.
  36.  7
    Sarah K. Brem (2003). Structure and Pragmatics in Informal Argument: Circularity and Question-Begging. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):147-149.
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  37.  38
    Sarah K. Hansen (2013). Julia Kristeva and the Politics of Life. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):27-42.
    In her recent writings on the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, Julia Kristeva develops a theory of power and subjectivity that engages implicitly, if not explicitly, with biopolitical themes. Exploring these engagements, this paper draws on Kristeva to discuss the mute symptoms of homo sacer and the regulatory power of the spectacle. Staging an uncommon (and sometimes antagonistic) conversation between Kristeva, Agamben, and Foucault, I construct a field of inquiry that I term the “psychic life of biopolitics.”.
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  38.  6
    Sarah K. Brem & Karen Z. Anijar (2003). The Bioethics of Fiction: The Chimera in Film and Print. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):22 – 24.
    (2003). The Bioethics of Fiction: The Chimera in Film and Print. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 22-24. doi: 10.1162/15265160360706787.
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  39.  2
    Sarah K. Burgess (2015). Exposing the Ruins of Law: The Rhetorical Contours of Recognition's Demand. Philosophy and Rhetoric 48 (4):516-535.
    What makes identity politics a significant departure from earlier, pre-identitarian forms of the politics of recognition is its demand for recognition on the basis of the very grounds on which recognition has previously been denied: it is qua women, qua blacks, qua lesbians that groups demand recognition.... The demand is not for inclusion within the fold of “universal humankind,” on the basis of shared human attributes; nor is it for respect “in spite of” one’s differences. Rather, what is demanded is (...)
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  40.  28
    Sarah K. Paul (2011). Reasons From Within: Desires and Values, by Alan Goldman. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  41.  25
    Sarah K. Donovan (2008). Teaching Philosophy Outside of the Classroom: One Alternative to Service Learning. Teaching Philosophy 31 (2):161-177.
    In this article I describe my experience teaching a moral problems course to first-year students within a Learning Community model. I begin with the learning goals and the mechanics of both my Learning Community and my moral problems course. I then focus on the experiential learning requirement of my Learning Community which is based on a field trip model instead of a service learning model. I describe how two field trips in particular—one to an Arab American community in Brooklyn, New (...)
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  42.  3
    Sarah K. Pinnock (2012). Buddhism for a Violent World (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 32 (1):157-160.
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  43.  1
    Sarah K. Burgess (2015). Guest Editor's Introduction. Philosophy and Rhetoric 48 (4):369-378.
    “Recognition” has become a keyword of our time. Yet this word [recognition] runs insistently through my readings, appearing sometimes like a gremlin who pops up at the wrong place, at other times as welcomed, even as looked for and anticipated. Which places are those? Recognition demands our attention. As a “keyword,” its significance is measured in part simply by the number of times it appears across the pages of the works that occupy our desks. Claimed by political theorists, moral philosophers, (...)
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  44.  24
    Sarah K. Donovan, Luce Irigaray. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  45.  7
    Sarah K. Andersen (2012). In August We Drove Up the Blunt Mountains to Dawson City. Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (4):293-294.
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  46.  2
    Sarah K. Hansen (2014). Pedagogies of Revolt, Politics of the Self. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):56-61.
    In "New Forms of Revolt," Julia Kristeva maintains that intimate revolt is a necessary, if imperiled, mode of contemporary resistance. This essay reflects on the pedagogical dimensions of intimate revolt and its fate in university contexts, especially in the United States. I argue that a Kristevan pedagogical revolt involves upheavals of thought supported by loving listening relationships.
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  47.  9
    Sarah K. Burgess & Stuart J. Murray (2006). For More Than One Voice: Toward a Philosophy of Vocal Expression (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 39 (2):166-169.
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  48.  5
    Sarah K. Donovan (2005). Modern French Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 28 (1):99-102.
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  49.  1
    Miranda L. Campbell, Stephanie M. Gorka, Sarah K. McGowan, Brady D. Nelson, Casey Sarapas, Andrea C. Katz, E. Jenna Robison-Andrew & Stewart A. Shankman (2014). Does Anxiety Sensitivity Correlate with Startle Habituation? An Examination in Two Independent Samples. Cognition and Emotion 28 (1):46-58.
  50.  5
    Sarah K. Pinnock (2010). Review of Richard Grigg, Gods After God: An Introduction to Contemporary Radical Theologies. [REVIEW] Sophia 49 (2):315-316.
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