Search results for 'Sarah Moses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sarah Moses (2009). "Keeping the Heart": Natural Affection in Joseph Butler's Approach to Virtue. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):613-629.score: 240.0
    This essay considers eighteenth-century Anglican thinker Joseph Butler's view of the role of natural emotions in moral reasoning and action. Emotions such as compassion and resentment are shown to play a positive role in the moral life by motivating action and by directing agents toward certain good objects—for example, relief of misery and justice. For Butler, moral virtue is present when these natural affections are kept in proper proportion by the "superior" principles of the moral life—conscience, self-love, and benevolence—which involve (...)
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  2. John Chisholm & Michael Moses (1998). An Undecidable Linear Order That Is $N$-Decidable for All $N$. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 39 (4):519-526.score: 60.0
    A linear order is -decidable if its universe is and the relations defined by formulas are uniformly computable. This means that there is a computable procedure which, when applied to a formula and a sequence of elements of the linear order, will determine whether or not is true in the structure. A linear order is decidable if the relations defined by all formulas are uniformly computable. These definitions suggest two questions. Are there, for each , -decidable linear orders that are (...)
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  3. Michele S. Moses (1997). Multicultural Education as Fostering Individual Autonomy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (4):373-388.score: 30.0
    This article attempts a philosophical defense of an autonomy-based approach to multicultural education. I contend that multicultural education is necessary in order for students to be able to develop personal autonomy. This, in turn, can empower students to effectively formulate their own version of the good life. The development of autonomy need not, as many critics claim, promote atomistic individualism. Rather, contemporary liberal autonomy strives for a balance between the individual and the community. In defending multicultural education, my argument relies (...)
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  4. Joseph Y. Halpern & Yoram Moses (1986). Taken by Surprise: The Paradox of the Surprise Test Revisited. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 15 (3):281 - 304.score: 30.0
    A teacher announced to his pupils that on exactly one of the days of the following school week (Monday through Friday) he would give them a test. But it would be a surprise test; on the evening before the test they would not know that the test would take place the next day. One of the brighter students in the class then argued that the teacher could never give them the test. "It can't be Friday," she said, "since in that (...)
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  5. Bertram Malle, L. J. Moses & Dare Baldwin (eds.) (2001). Intentions and Intentionality: Foundations of Social Cognition. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    Highlights the roles of intention and intentionality in social cognition.
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  6. Stéphane Mosès (2009). The Angel of History: Rosenzweig, Benjamin, Scholem. Stanford University Press.score: 30.0
    Franz Rosenzweig : the other side of the West -- Dissimilation -- Hegel taken literally -- Utopia and redemption -- Walter Benjamin : the three models of history -- Metaphors of origin : ideas, names, stars -- The esthetic model -- The angel of history -- Gershem Scholem : the secret history -- The paradoxes of messianism -- Kafka, Freud, and the crisis of tradition -- Language and secularization.
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  7. Stéphane Mosès (2007). The Bible and the Caesurae of Time. Naharaim - Zeitschrift Für Deutsch-Jüdische Literatur Und Kulturgeschichte 1 (1).score: 30.0
     
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  8. A. D. Moses (1998). Structure and Agency in the Holocaust: Daniel J. Goldhagen and His Critics. History and Theory 37 (2):194–219.score: 30.0
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  9. Stéphanè Mosès (1998). Emmanuel Levinas: Ethics as Primary Meaning. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 20 (2/1):13-24.score: 30.0
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  10. A. Dirk Moses (2005). 3. The Public Relevance of Historical Studies: A Rejoinder to Hayden White. History and Theory 44 (3):339–347.score: 30.0
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  11. Michele S. Moses & Michael J. Nanna (2007). The Testing Culture and the Persistence of High Stakes Testing Reforms. Education and Culture 23 (1):55-72.score: 30.0
    : The purposes of this critical analysis are to clarify why high stakes testing reforms have become so prevalent in the United States and to explain the connection between current federal and state emphases on standardized testing reforms and educational opportunities. The article outlines the policy context for high stakes examinations, as well as the ideas of testing and accountability as major tenets of current education reform and policy. In partial explanation of the widespread acceptance and use of standardized tests (...)
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  12. Ronald Fagin, Joseph Y. Halpern, Yoram Moses & Moshe Y. Vardi (1997). Reasoning About Knowledge: A Response by the Authors. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 7 (1):113-113.score: 30.0
  13. Stéphane Mosès & Hartwig Wiedebach (eds.) (1997). Hermann Cohen's Philosophy of Religion: International Conference in Jerusalem, 1996. Georg Olms Verlag.score: 30.0
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  14. Nancy Berlinger & Jacob Moses (2008). Pandemic Flu Planning in the Community: What Can Clinical Ethicists Bring to the Public Health Table? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (04):468-470.score: 30.0
    It is still remarkably difficult for public health officials charged with developing and implementing pandemic influenza preparedness plans at the community levelto obtain clear, concrete, and consistent guidance on how to construct plans that are both ethical and actionable. As of mid-2007, most of the federal and state pandemic plans filed with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, describing how public health officials will coordinate public agencies and private entities in the event of an outbreak, failed to include ethical (...)
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  15. M. Moses (1988). Decidable Discrete Linear Orders. Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (2):531-539.score: 30.0
    Three classes of decidable discrete linear orders with varying degrees of effectiveness are investigated. We consider how a classical order type may lie in relation to these three classes, and we characterize by their order types elements of these classes that have effective nontrivial self-embeddings.
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  16. Stéphane Mosès (2009). On the Epistemological Premises of Psychoanalysis. Naharaim - Zeitschrift Für Deutsch-Jüdische Literatur Und Kulturgeschichte 3 (2).score: 30.0
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  17. Greg Moses (1998). Race-Ing Justice: Randall Kennedy's Race, Crime, and the Law. Radical Philosophy Review 1 (2):150-156.score: 30.0
  18. Stéphane Mosès (2009). Three Forms of Peace in the Jewish Tradition. Naharaim - Zeitschrift Für Deutsch-Jüdische Literatur Und Kulturgeschichte 3 (2).score: 30.0
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  19. Michele S. Moses (2004). Contested Ideals: Understanding Moral Disagreements Over Education Policy. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (4):471–482.score: 30.0
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  20. Michele S. Moses (2004). Social Welfare, the Neo-Conservative Turn and Educational Opportunity. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (2):275–286.score: 30.0
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  21. David Gnanaprakasam Moses (1950). Religious Truth and the Relation Between Religions. Madras, Christian Literature Society for India.score: 30.0
     
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  22. Yolanda T. Moses (2008). Thinking Anthropologically About ?Race:? Human Variation, Cultural Construction, and Dispelling Myths. In Philip Carl Salzman & Patricia C. Rice (eds.), Thinking Anthropologically: A Practical Guide for Students. Pearson Prentice Hall.score: 30.0
  23. Iulia Iuga (2010). Stephane Moses, Sistem si revelatie. Filosofia lui Franz Rosenzweig/ System and revelation. Franz Rosenzweig's Philosophy. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (9):159-161.score: 24.0
    Stephane Moses, Sistem si revelatie. Filosofia lui Franz Rosenzweig Bucuresti, Ed. Hasefer, Colectia Judaica, 2003.
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  24. Linda Martín Alcoff & Sarah K. Miraglia, Is Sarah Palin a Feminist?score: 18.0
    We have been teaching gender issues and feminist theory for many years, and we know that there is certainly a diversity of views among women, and men, about what counts as feminist or as good for women. Some may see a competent woman running for V.P as inevitably a step forward for women's equality. But consider this.
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  25. Lisa Guenther (2006). "Like a Maternal Body": Emmanuel Levinas and the Motherhood of Moses. Hypatia 21 (1):119-136.score: 18.0
    : Emmanuel Levinas compares ethical responsibility to a maternal body who bears the Other in the same without assimilation. In explicating this trope, he refers to a biblical passage in which Moses is like a "wet nurse" bearing Others whom he has "neither conceived nor given birth to" (Num. 11:12). A close reading of this passage raises questions about ethics, maternity, and sexual difference, for both the concept of ethical substitution and the material practice of mothering.
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  26. JeeLoo Liu, § The Case of Moses [Wittgenstein].score: 18.0
     Under [A]:  Under [B]: (i) “Moses” means the same (i) ‘Moses’ refers to the “the man who did such man who did such and and such”. such. (ii) “ Moses did not exist” = (ii) “Moses did not exist” = ? “The man who did such (the set of descriptions and such did not exist” or do not refer?) “that no one person did such and such.”.
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  27. María Lugones (1990). Review: Hispaneando y Lesbiando: On Sarah Hoagland's "Lesbian Ethics". [REVIEW] Hypatia 5 (3):138 - 146.score: 18.0
    This review looks at Sarah Hoagland's Lesbian Ethics from the position of a lesbian who is also a cultural participant in a colonized heterosexualist culture (la cultura Nuevomejicana) within the powerful context of its colonizing heterosexualist culture (Angloamerican culture). From this position separation from heterosexualism acquires great complexity since the position described is that of a plural self. In Lesbian Ethics lesbian community is the community of separation where demoralization is avoided by auto-koenonous selves. Because heterosexualism is not a (...)
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  28. R. Z. Friedman (1998). Freud's Religion: Oedipus and Moses. Religious Studies 34 (2):135-149.score: 18.0
    "Moses and Monotheism" is Freud's last book on religion. It was published in its entirety only after his flight from Nazi-occupied Vienna. Moses is perhaps Freud's most controversial book on religion. It is both an apology and a curse. It is a critique of traditional Judaism (by way of an Oedipal analysis of a deified Moses), a defence of a modern humanistic Judaism (a Judaism of moral and intellectual values), and a bitter critique of Christianity (a religion (...)
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  29. Joanne Faulkner (2008). "Keeping It in the Family": Sarah Kofman Reading Nietzsche as a Jewish Woman. Hypatia 23 (1):41-64.score: 18.0
    : This article examines Sarah Kofman's interpretation of Nietzsche in light of the claim that interpretation was for her both an articulation of her identity and a mode of deconstructing the very notion of identity. Faulkner argues that Kofman's work on Nietzsche can be understood as autobiographical, in that it served to mediate a relation to her self. Faulkner examines this relation with reference to Klein's model of the child's connection to its mother. By examining Kofman's later writings on (...)
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  30. Charles H. Manekin (2002). Maimonides on Divine Knowledge—Moses of Narbonne's Averroist Reading. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (1):51-74.score: 18.0
    In various writings Maimonides claims that God’s knowledge encompasses sublunar things, including human affairs, that we are incapable of understanding the nature of this knowledge, and that the term “knowing” is equivocal when said of God and of humans. In the fourteenth century these claims were given widely divergent interpretations. According to Levi ben Gershom (Gersonides, 1288–1344), Maimonides was compelled by religious considerations to maintain that God knows sublunar particulars in all their particularity, and to adopt a position that was (...)
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  31. Leo Strauss (2012). Leo Strauss on Moses Mendelssohn. The University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    Leo Strauss's introductions to ten writings of Moses Mendelssohn -- Preliminary remark by Alexander Altmann -- Introduction to Pope a metaphysician! -- Introduction to "Epistle to Mr. Lessing in Leipzig" -- Introduction to Commentary on Moses Maimonides' "Logical terms" -- Introduction to Treatise on evidence in metaphysical sciences -- Introduction to Phädon -- Introduction to Treatise on the incorporeality of the human soul -- Introduction to "On a handwritten essay of Mr. de Luc's" -- Introduction to The soul (...)
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  32. Oliver Leaman (1990). Moses Maimonides. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Moses Maimonides (1135--1204) is recognized both as a leading Jewish thinker and as one of the most radical philosophers of the Islamic world.
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  33. Sean Eisen Murphy (2007). “The Law Was Given for the Sake of Life”: Peter Abelard on the Law of Moses. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):271-306.score: 18.0
    Abelard’s most famous spokesman for the ancient and abiding moral and religious worth of the Law of Moses is probably the character of the Jew, inventedfor one of two fictional dialogues in the Collationes. The equally fictive Philosopher, a rationalist theist who gets the last word in his exchange with the Jew, condemns the Law as a useless addition to the natural law, a threat to genuine morality with a highly dubious claim to divine origin. The Philosopher’s condemnation, however, (...)
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  34. C. M. Lorkowski (2009). The Miracle of Moses. Heythrop Journal 50 (2):181-188.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I draw out a tension between miracles, prophecy, and Spinoza’s assertions about Moses in the Theological-Political Treatise (TTP). The three seem to constitute an inconsistent triad. Spinoza’s account of miracles requires a naturalistic interpretation of all events. This categorical claim must therefore apply to prophecy; specifically, Moses’ hearing God’s voice in a manner which does not seem to invoke the imagination or natural phenomena. Thus, Spinoza seemingly cannot maintain both Moses’ exalted status and his (...)
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  35. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Aggadic Moses: Spinoza and Freud on the Traumatic Legacy of Theological-Political Identity. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):3-21.score: 18.0
    This paper attempts to explore the problem of collective identity and its subsequent historical legacies through a reading of Spinoza’s and Freud’s respective accounts of Moses. In working their way through the aggadah (i.e., legend) of Moses, both Spinoza and Freud find the halakhic (i.e., legal) core of collectivity to be expressed in and as social mediation. Moreover, both thinkers discover that the occlusion of this core leads to a collective trauma (in Freud’s sense), the symptom of which (...)
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  36. Carol Van Kirk (1990). Review: Sarah Lucia Hoagland's "Lesbian Ethics: Toward New Value" and Ablemindism. [REVIEW] Hypatia 5 (3):147 - 152.score: 18.0
    Sarah Hoagland suggests that through developing the method of "attending" and the ethics of "autokoenony," individual integrity and agency will result. While acknowledging the utility of these ideals for many lesbians and wimmin, I argue that Hoagland's thesis is, regrettably, not universally applicable.
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  37. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Aggadic Moses. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):3-21.score: 18.0
    This paper attempts to explore the problem of collective identity and its subsequent historical legacies through a reading of Spinoza’s and Freud’s respective accounts of Moses. In working their way through the aggadah (i.e., legend) of Moses, both Spinoza and Freud find the halakhic (i.e., legal) core of collectivity to be expressed in and as social mediation. Moreover, both thinkers discover that the occlusion of this core leads to a collective trauma (in Freud’s sense), the symptom of which (...)
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  38. José Crisóstomo de Souza (2013). Moses Hess como “espectro” feuerbachiano de Marx. Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 18 (1):191-218.score: 18.0
    This paper offers elements for a revealing genealogy of Marx’s mature conceptions, brought up by a reconsideration of the philosophical positions of his ally Moses Hess and of the close theorietical relations between them. It resorts first to a narrative mode to underscore the place of Hess in that development, bringing into closer association their ideas, also with Young Hegelianism and Feuerbachianism from which they start. The companionship of Hess presents itself, then, as the living shadow of a lingering (...)
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  39. Herbert A. Davidson (2005). Moses Maimonides: The Man and His Works. OUP USA.score: 18.0
    Moses Maimonides, rabbinist, philosopher, and physician, had a greater impact on Jewish history than any other medieval figure. Born in Cordova, Spain, in 1137 or 1138, he spent a few years in Morocco, visited Palestine, and settled in Egypt by 1167. He died there in 1204. Maimonides was a man of superlatives. He wrote the first commentary to cover the entire Mishna corpus; composed what quickly became the dominant work on the 613 commandments believed to have been given by (...)
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  40. Helge Dedek (2012). Duties of Love and Self-Perfection: Moses Mendelssohn's Theory of Contract. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 32 (4):713-739.score: 18.0
    In his Doctrine of Right, Immanuel Kant calls Moses Mendelssohn, the towering figure of the German and the Jewish Enlightenment, a ‘Rechtsforscher’—a legal scholar. Yet not only Kant, but numerous scholars of Natural law in the 18th and 19th centuries refer to and reflect on the juridical aspects of Mendelssohn’s work, in particular his thoughts on the law of contract. In this article, I hope to shed some light on this hitherto rather unexplored facet of Mendelssohn’s oeuvre. Mendelssohn develops (...)
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  41. Michael E. Hasselmo (forthcoming). Remembering by Index and Content: Response to Sarah Robins. Philosophical Psychology:1-4.score: 18.0
    In her review of my book How we remember: Brain mechanisms of episodic memory, Sarah Robins highlights my example of the problem of interference between memories accessed by content-addressable memory. However, she points out the difficulty of solving this problem with index-addressable representations such as time cells or arc length cells. Namely, the index-addressable memory requires knowing the unique index in advance in order to perform effective retrieval. This is a difficult problem, but should be solvable by forming bi-directional (...)
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  42. David M. Hay (1990). Moses Through New Testament Spectacles. Interpretation 44 (3):240-252.score: 18.0
    In the New Testament treatment of Moses, the early church affirmed its continuity with him and therefore with the Jewish community of which he was the leader, a continuity which offers a basis for improving modern Jewish-Christian dialogue.
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  43. Frederick Herzog (1990). Moses in Contemporary Theology. Interpretation 44 (3):253-264.score: 18.0
    The way of shaping present “riffraff” into community in our wilderness is not identical to that of Moses at Sinai, but the need to establish law and to offer it as gospel is very much the same.
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  44. Jacqueline E. Lapsley (2004). Friends with God? Moses and the Possibility of Covenantal Friendship. Interpretation 58 (2):117-129.score: 18.0
    The friendship shared by Moses and God offers a more appropriate model of faithfulness than Israel's prescribed obedience. The intimacy of their relationship offers an alternative model for the church's relationship to God, a countercultural “covenantal friendship.”.
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  45. Sarah A. McDaniel (2012). Sarah's List Exchange Experience. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2 (1):26-29.score: 18.0
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  46. Gary Thomas & Jane Tarr (1999). Ideology and Inclusion: A Reply to Croll and Moses. British Journal of Educational Studies 47 (1):17 - 27.score: 18.0
    Our differences with Croll and Moses centre on their interpretation of the term 'inclusion', the way in which they theorise their findings, and their use of the terms 'pragmatism' and 'ideology' as instruments of analysis in trying to understand a patchy move to inclusion. In particular, a taken-as-given use of the term 'ideological' to describe the views of others is troublesome, carrying as it does intimations of partisanship in others, but only rationality in the user. We suggest that if (...)
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  47. S. Dean Mc Bride (1990). Transcendent Authority The Role of Moses in Old Testament Traditions. Interpretation 44 (3):229-239.score: 18.0
    Moses transmits to Israel the call of a God of incomparable power, and his intimate access to that power without being destroyed by it makes him not only mediator but model for the formation of a people set apart, holy to Yahweh.
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  48. Edward F. Campbell (1975). Moses and the Foundations of Israel. Interpretation 29 (2):141-154.score: 18.0
    The historical question about the beginning of Israel and its faith is first of all a question about the figure of Moses and the character of his contribution to that beginning.
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  49. Elisabeth L. Flynn (1990). Moses in the Visual Arts. Interpretation 44 (3):265-276.score: 18.0
    Moses as a challenge to artistic representation has spanned the centuries, and modern attempts to meet that challenge show that the figure of Moses remains alive and visible even in our day.
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  50. Patrick D. Miller (1987). Moses My Servant” The Deuteronomic Portrait of Moses. Interpretation 41 (3):245-255.score: 18.0
    The words of Moses embodied in Deuteronomy gave Israel all that was needed for its life as a community under God, guided and blessed by him.
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