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  1. Sarah Williams Holtman (2004). Kantian Justice and Poverty Relief. Kant-Studien 95 (1):86-106.
  2. Sarah Williams Holtman (2003). Three Strategies for Theorizing About Justice. American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (2):77 - 90.
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  3. Sarah Williams Holtman (2001). A Third Concept of Liberty. Philosophical Review 110 (3):437-440.
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  4. Sarah Williams Holtman (1999). Kant, Ideal Theory, and the Justice of Exclusionary Zoning. Ethics 110 (1):32-58.
  5. Cass R. Sunstein, Edna Ullmann‐Margalit, Sarah Williams Holtman, Philip Kitcher, Linda Barclay & John Martin Fischer (1999). 10. Jerrold Levinson, Ed., Aesthetics and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection Jerrold Levinson, Ed., Aesthetics and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection (Pp. 215-219). [REVIEW] Ethics 110 (1).
     
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  6. Sarah Williams Holtman (1998). Comments on O'Neill: Instituting Principles: Between Duty and Action. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (S1):97-102.
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  7. Sarah Williams Holtman (1998). Towards Justice and Virtue. Journal of Philosophy 95 (6):317-321.
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  8. Sarah Williams Holtman (1997). Comments on O'Neill. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (Supplement):97-102.
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  9. Sarah Williams Holtman (1997). Toward Social Reform: Kant's Penal Theory Reinterpreted. Utilitas 9 (01):3-.
    Here I set the stage for developing a Kantian account of punishment attuned to social and economic injustice and to the need for prison reform. I argue that we cannot appreciate Kant's own discussion of punishment unless we read it in light of the theory of justice of which it is a part and the fundamental commitments of that theory to freedom, autonomy and equality. As important, we cannot properly evaluate Kant's advocacy of the law of retribution unless we recognize (...)
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  10. Sarah Williams Holtman (1995). Review: Beiner & Booth (Eds), Kant and Political Philosophy: The Contemporary Legacy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (2):348-350.
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