Search results for 'Saving and investment' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Steven Daskal (2013). Saving for Retirement Without Harming Others. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):147-156.score: 78.0
    This article discusses moral issues raised by defined contribution retirement plans, specifically 401(k) plans in the United States. The primary aim is to defend the claim that the federal government ought to require 401(k) plans to include a range of socially responsible investment (SRI) options. The analysis begins with the minimal assumption that corporations engage in behavior that imposes morally impermissible harms on others with sufficient regularity to warrant attention. After motivating this assumption, I argue that individual investors typically (...)
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  2. Christine Ennew, Alison McGregor & Stephen Diacon (1994). Ethical Aspects of the Marketing of Savings and Investment Products in the UK. Business Ethics 3 (2):123–129.score: 50.0
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  3. Frank Plumpton Ramsey (1931/1978). Foundations: Essays in Philosophy, Logic, Mathematics, and Economics. Humanties Press.score: 48.0
  4. Alfred Wolf (1987). Saving the Small Farm: Agriculture in Roman Literature. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 4 (2-3):65-75.score: 36.0
    Roman agriculture suffered traumatic changes during the 2nd century B.C. The traditional farmers who tilled their few acres and served family, gods and community were being squeezed out by large estate owners using slaves for investment farming. Politicians, scholars and poets tried to revive the ancestoral rustic life.In 133 B.C. the Gracchi legislated land reform to relieve the distress of the farmer soldiers who had won the empire. Although their efforts led to political confrontation that deteriorated into civil war, (...)
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  5. Tim Benijts (2010). A Framework for Comparing Socially Responsible Investment Markets: An Analysis of the Dutch and Belgian Retail Markets. Business Ethics 19 (1):50-63.score: 30.0
    The increasing popularity of socially responsible investment among individual investors throughout Europe reveals the need for a framework that allows the comparison of socially responsible retail markets in different European countries. This article proposes such a framework, containing 16 different characteristics of socially responsible retail markets describing the size, institutionalization and nature of this market and correcting for differences in the size of countries and financial markets. When this framework was applied to the Dutch and Belgian socially responsible retail (...)
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  6. Jonas Nilsson (2008). Investment with a Conscience: Examining the Impact of Pro-Social Attitudes and Perceived Financial Performance on Socially Responsible Investment Behavior. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):307 - 325.score: 24.0
    This article addresses the growing industry of retail socially responsible investment (SRI) profiled mutual funds. Very few previous studies have examined the final consumer of SRI profiled mutual funds. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to, in an exploratory manner, examine the impact of a number of pro-social, financial performance, and socio-demographic variables on SRI behavior in order to explain why investors choose to invest different proportions of their investment portfolio in SRI profiled funds. An ordinal logistic (...)
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  7. Greig A. Mill (2006). The Financial Performance of a Socially Responsible Investment Over Time and a Possible Link with Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):131 - 148.score: 24.0
    This paper empirically examines the financial performance of a UK unit trust that was initially “conventional” and later adopted socially responsible investment (SRI) principles (ethical investment principles). Comparison is made with three similar conventional funds whose investment objectives remained unchanged. Analysis techniques employed in previous studies find similar results: mean risk-adjusted performance is unchanged by the switch to SRI, with no evidence of over-or under-performance relative to the benchmark market index by any of the four funds. More (...)
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  8. Avshalom Madhala Adam & Tal Shavit (2008). How Can a Ratings-Based Method for Assessing Corporate Social Responsibility (Csr) Provide an Incentive to Firms Excluded From Socially Responsible Investment Indices to Invest in Csr? Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):899 - 905.score: 24.0
    Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) indices play a major role in the stock markets. A connection between doing good and doing well in business is implied. Leading indices, such as the Domini Social Index and others, exemplify the movement toward investing in socially responsible corporations. However, the question remains: Does the ratings-based methodology for assessing corporate social responsibility (CSR) provide an incentive to firms excluded from SRI indices to invest in CSR? Not in its current format. The ratings-based methodology employed (...)
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  9. Douglas Cumming & Sofia Johan (2007). Socially Responsible Institutional Investment in Private Equity. Journal of Business Ethics 75 (4):395 - 416.score: 24.0
    This article studies institutional investor allocations to the socially responsible asset class. We propose two elements influence socially responsible institutional investment in private equity: internal organizational structure, and internationalization. We study socially responsible investments from Dutch institutional investments into private equity funds, and compare socially responsible investment across different asset classes and different types of institutional investors (banks, insurance companies, and pension funds). The data indicate socially responsible investment in private equity is 40–50% more common when the (...)
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  10. Frédérique Déjean, Stéphanie Giamporcaro, Jean-Pascal Gond, Bernard Leca & Elise Penalva-Icher (2013). Mistaking an Emerging Market for a Social Movement? A Comment on Arjaliès' Social-Movement Perspective on Socially Responsible Investment in France. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):205-212.score: 24.0
    In a recent contribution to this journal, Arjaliès (J Bus Ethics 92:57—78, 2010) suggests that the emergence of socially responsible investment (SRI) in France can be best described as a social movement with a collective identity that aimed to challenge the dominant logic of the financial market. Such an account is at odds with a body of empirical studies that approaches SRI in the French context as a process of market creation led by loosely coordinated actors with contradictory and (...)
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  11. Benjamin J. Richardson (2009). Keeping Ethical Investment Ethical: Regulatory Issues for Investing for Sustainability. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):555 - 572.score: 24.0
    Regulation must target the financial sector, which often funds and profits from environmentally unsustainable development. In an era of global financial markets, the financial sector has a crucial impact on the state of the environment. The long-standing movement for ethically and socially responsible investment (SRI) has recently begun to advocate environmental standards for financiers. While this movement is gaining more adherents, it has increasingly justified responsible financing as a path to be prosperous, rather than virtuous. This trend partly owes (...)
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  12. Neil Stuart Eccles (2010). UN Principles for Responsible Investment Signatories and the Anti-Apartheid SRI Movement: A Thought Experiment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):415 - 424.score: 24.0
    There appears to be a growing disquiet amongst academics surrounding the ascendancy of 'responsible' investment that is egoist or self-interested in character — 'business case' responsible investment. This ascendancy has in no small measure been associated with the uptake of United Nations Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) as a de facto standard for mainstream responsible investment. This article contributes to this disquiet. It does this by examining how egoist 'responsible' investors (as endorsed by the PRI) might (...)
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  13. David A. Coall & Ralph Hertwig (2010). Grandparental Investment: Past, Present, and Future. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):1-19.score: 24.0
    What motivates grandparents to their altruism? We review answers from evolutionary theory, sociology, and economics. Sometimes in direct conflict with each other, these accounts of grandparental investment exist side-by-side, with little or no theoretical integration. They all account for some of the data, and none account for all of it. We call for a more comprehensive theoretical framework of grandparental investment that addresses its proximate and ultimate causes, and its variability due to lineage, values, norms, institutions (e.g., inheritance (...)
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  14. Stewart Jones, Sandra van der Laan, Geoff Frost & Janice Loftus (2008). The Investment Performance of Socially Responsible Investment Funds in Australia. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):181 - 203.score: 24.0
    Interest in the notion of the possible financial sacrifice suffered by socially responsible investment (SRI) fund investors for considering ethical, social and environmental issues in their investment decisions has spawned considerable academic interest in the performance of SRI funds. Both the Australian and international research literature have yielded largely mixed results. However, several of these studies are hampered by methodological problems which can obscure the significance of reported results, such as the use of small sample sizes, inconsistencies in (...)
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  15. Roland Bardy, Stephen Drew & Tumenta F. Kennedy (2012). Foreign Investment and Ethics: How to Contribute to Social Responsibility by Doing Business in Less-Developed Countries. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):267-282.score: 24.0
    Do foreign direct investment (FDI) and international business ventures promote positive social and economic development in emerging nations? This question will always prove contentious. First, the impacts differ according to context. Second, the social consequences and spillover effects of knowledge diffusion and technology-sharing may be limited and hard to measure. Third, contributions to enhancing social responsibility and improving living standards in host countries are delayed in effect, causally complex, and also hard to measure. Outcomes often critically depend on collaboration (...)
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  16. Joakim Sandberg (2011). Socially Responsible Investment and Fiduciary Duty: Putting the Freshfields Report Into Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (1):143-162.score: 24.0
    A critical issue for the future growth and impact of socially responsible investment (SRI) is whether institutional investors are legally permitted to engage in it – in particular whether it is compatible with the fiduciary duties of trustees. An ambitious report from the United Nations Environment Programme’s Finance Initiative (UNEP FI), commonly referred to as the ‘Freshfields report’, has recently given rise to considerable optimism on this issue among proponents of SRI. The present article puts the arguments of the (...)
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  17. Josep M. Lozano, Laura Albareda & M. Rosario Balaguer (2006). Socially Responsible Investment in the Spanish Financial Market. Journal of Business Ethics 69 (3):305 - 316.score: 24.0
    This paper reviews the development of socially responsible investment (SRI) in the Spanish financial market. The year, 1997 saw the appearance in Spain of the first SRI mutual fund, but it was not until late 1999, that major Spanish fund managers offered SRI mutual funds on the retail market. The development of SRI in the Spanish financial market has not experienced the high levels of development seen in other European countries, such as France or Italy, where interest in SRI (...)
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  18. William R. Pasewark & Mark E. Riley (2010). It's a Matter of Principle: The Role of Personal Values in Investment Decisions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (2):237 - 253.score: 24.0
    We investigate the role of personal values in an investment decision in a controlled experimental setting. Participants were asked to choose an investment in a bond issued by a tobacco company or a bond issued by a non-tobacco company that offered an equal or sometimes lower yield. We then surveyed the participants regarding their feelings toward tobacco use to determine whether these values influenced their investment decision. Using factor analysis, we identified investment- and tobacco-related dimensions on (...)
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  19. Joakim Sandberg, Carmen Juravle, Ted Martin Hedesström & Ian Hamilton (2009). The Heterogeneity of Socially Responsible Investment. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):519 - 533.score: 24.0
    Many writers have commented on the heterogeneity of the socially responsible investment (SRI) movement. However, few have actually tried to understand and explain it, and even fewer have discussed whether the opposite – standardisation – is possible and desirable. In this article, we take a broader perspective on the issue of the heterogeneity of SRI. We distinguish between four levels on which heterogeneity can be found: the terminological, definitional, strategic and practical. Whilst there is much talk about the definitional (...)
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  20. Timo Busch & Volker H. Hoffmann (2009). Ecology-Driven Real Options: An Investment Framework for Incorporating Uncertainties in the Context of the Natural Environment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):295 - 310.score: 24.0
    The role of uncertainty within an organization’s environment features prominently in the business ethics and management literature, but how corporate investment decisions should proceed in the face of uncertainties relating to the natural environment is less discussed. From the perspective of ecological economics, the salience of ecology-induced issues challenges management to address new types of uncertainties. These pertain to constraints within the natural environment as well as to institutional action aimed at conserving the natural environment. We derive six areas (...)
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  21. Grant Michelson, Nick Wailes, Sandra Van Der Laan & Geoff Frost (2004). Ethical Investment Processes and Outcomes. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):1-10.score: 24.0
    There is a growing body of literature on ethical or socially responsible investment across a range of disciplines. This paper highlights the key themes in the field and identifies some of the major theoretical and practical challenges facing both scholars and practitioners. One of these challenges is understanding better the complexity of the relationship between such investment practices and corporate behaviour. Noting that ethical investment is seldom characterised by agreement about what it actully constitutes, and that much (...)
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  22. Stephen Dillenburg, Timothy Greene & O. Homer Erekson (2003). Approaching Socially Responsible Investment with a Comprehensive Ratings Scheme: Total Social Impact. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (3):167 - 177.score: 24.0
    The socially responsible investment industry (SRI) is slowly changing from a screening, avoidance paradigm to a comprehensive paradigm that seeks to affect corporate behavior. Credible rating systems are a key component of this sea change. Reliable and recognizable social and environmental metrics are critical to this progress. The Total Social Impact (TSI) rating approach is a new social metric scheme based on a comprehensive rating of stakeholder issues. This paper describes the evolution of SRI ratings and the role that (...)
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  23. Kyoko Sakuma & Céline Louche (2008). Socially Responsible Investment in Japan: Its Mechanism and Drivers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):425 - 448.score: 24.0
    The paper explores the emergence and development of socially responsible investment (SRI) in Japan. SRI is a recent field in Japan. It is not clear which model it will follow: the European, American or its own model. Through the analysis of the historical roots of SRI, the key actors and motivations that have contributed to its diffusion, the paper provides explorative grounds to sketch the translation mechanisms of SRI in Japan and offers insight into its future path. Based on (...)
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  24. N. S. Eccles & S. Viviers (2011). The Origins and Meanings of Names Describing Investment Practices That Integrate a Consideration of ESG Issues in the Academic Literature. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):389-402.score: 24.0
    The aim of this study was to reflect on the origins and meanings of names describing investment practices that integrate a consideration of environmental, social and corporate governance issues in the academic literature. A review of 190 academic papers spanning the period from 1975 to mid-2009 was conducted. This exploratory study evaluated the associations and disassociations of the primary name assigned to this genre of investment with variables grouped into five domains, namely Primary Ethical Position, Investment Strategy, (...)
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  25. Stephen Hay (2009). Transforming Social and Educational Governance: Trade Training Centres and the Transition to Social Investment Politics in Australia. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (3):285 - 304.score: 24.0
    Prior to its election to office in 2007, the Australian Labor Party announced a commitment to introduce Trade Training Centres (TTCs) into all Australian secondary schools as an initiative of its Education Revolution. TTCs were proposed as a key element of Federal Labor's education and training policy that aimed to manage future risks to Australia's competitiveness in the emerging global economy and to support school-to-employment transitions for young people. This analysis adopts a governmentality framework to conceptualise the Federal Government's introduction (...)
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  26. Céline Louche, Daniel Arenas & Katinka C. Cranenburgh (2012). From Preaching to Investing: Attitudes of Religious Organisations Towards Responsible Investment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):301-320.score: 24.0
    Religious organisations are major investors with sometimes substantial investment volumes. An important question for them is how to make investments in, and to earn returns from, companies and activities that are consistent with their religious beliefs or that even support these beliefs. Religious organisations have pioneered responsible investment. Yet little is known about their investment attitudes. This article addresses this gap by studying faith consistent investing. Based on a survey complemented by interviews, we investigate religious organisations’ attitudes (...)
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  27. Tjai M. Nielsen & Liesl Riddle (2009). Investing in Peace: The Motivational Dynamics of Diaspora Investment in Post-Conflict Economies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):435 - 448.score: 24.0
    Post-conflict economies often prove daunting for foreign investors. Many of these nations are reaching out to diasporans, emigrants, and their descendants living abroad, for much-needed foreign investment capital. Little is known about why diasporans invest in their countries of origin. Recent scholarly inquiry regarding investment decision making has suggested that non-pecuniary, psychological concerns often motivate investment decisions. We develop a conceptual model identifying three types of investment return expectations — financial, emotional, and those related to social (...)
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  28. Jeremy B. Fox, Joan M. Donohue & Jinpei Wu (2005). Beyond the Image of Foreign Direct Investment in China: Where Ethics Meets Public Relations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (4):317 - 324.score: 24.0
    While there had still been an increasing flow of foreign direct investment (FDI) into China during the 2002 downturn in FDI globally, such investments have historically been only sporadically successful. Much writing has detailed and discussed problems associated with China FDI but several costs remain dangerously overlooked. One such cost is that of micro-monitoring plants for work conditions and employee treatment in violation of local Chinese laws and possible home country ethics. Further, a more personal cost is presented – (...)
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  29. George Z. Peng & Paul W. Beamish (2008). The Effect of National Corporate Responsibility Environment on Japanese Foreign Direct Investment. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):677 - 695.score: 24.0
    We examine the relationship between Japanese foreign direct investment (FDI) and the national corporate responsibility (NCR) environment in host countries using corporate social responsibility and international business theories. Based on data from the Japanese Government’s Ministry of Finance AccountAbility, and other sources, we find that the level of NCR has a positive relationship with FDI inflow for developing countries. The relationship for developed countries is negative but not statistically significant. The underlying host country development stage moderates the relationship. The (...)
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  30. Sebastian Rathner (2013). The Influence of Primary Study Characteristics on the Performance Differential Between Socially Responsible and Conventional Investment Funds: A Meta-Analysis. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):349-363.score: 24.0
    Empirical studies, which analyze the performance of socially responsible investment (SRI) funds relative to conventional funds, find contradictory results. The aim of this paper is to investigate, with the help of a meta-analysis, how selected primary study characteristics influence the probability of a significant under- or outperformance of SRI funds compared with conventional funds. 25 studies with more than 500 observations are included in the meta-analysis. The results of this paper suggest that the consideration of the survivorship bias in (...)
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  31. Andrius Bambalas (2013). Practice of China's Encouragement on Capital Export and It's Protection Under International Investment Law: Lithuanian Case. Jurisprudence 20 (2):749-774.score: 24.0
    There are various notions of capital, but in this article movement of capital is being analysed from the perspective of international investment law – a country has an asset, which it cannot exploit or do so efficiently and there is a foreigner who possesses financing, technology or know-how, which allows to develop such asset. Lithuania is a net importer of capital, thus this article analyses on what might be the asset that Lithuanian government is interested in developing through foreign (...)
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  32. Mark Greene (2013). Saving a Life but Losing the Patient. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (6):479-498.score: 24.0
    Gregor Samsa awakes to find himself transformed into a gigantic bug. The creature’s inchoate flailing leads Gregor’s sister to conclude that Gregor is no more, having been replaced by a brute beast lacking any vestige of human understanding. Sadly, real cases of brain injury and disease can lead to psychological metamorphoses so profound that we cannot easily think that the survivor is the person we knew. I argue that there can be cases in which statements like, “It’s just not Gregor (...)
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  33. Emeka Nwankwo, Nelson Phillips & Paul Tracey (2007). Social Investment Through Community Enterprise: The Case of Multinational Corporations Involvement in the Development of Nigerian Water Resources. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (1):91 - 101.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the different mechanisms used by multinational corporations (MNCs) in Nigeria seeking to make long-term social investments by meeting the critical challenge of improving water provision. Community enterprise – an increasingly common form of social enterprise, which pursues charitable objectives through business activities – may be the most effective mechanism for building local capacity in a sustainable and accountable way. Traditionally, social investments by MNCs have involved either donations to a charity, which then assumes responsibility for delivering social (...)
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  34. Otgontsetseg Erhemjamts, Qian Li & Anand Venkateswaran (2013). Corporate Social Responsibility and Its Impact on Firms' Investment Policy, Organizational Structure, and Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):395-412.score: 24.0
    This study examines the determinants of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its implications on firms’ investment policy, organizational strategy, and performance. First, we find that firms with better performance, higher R&D intensity, better financial health, and firms in new economy industries are more likely to engage in CSR activities, while riskier firms are less likely to do so. We also find U-shaped relation between firm size and CSR, indicating that either very small or very large firms exhibit high levels (...)
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  35. Greg Hill (1996). Capitalism, Coordination, and Keynes: Rejoinder to Horwitz. Critical Review 10 (3):373-387.score: 24.0
    Abstract In the ideal market of general equilibrium theory, choices are made in full knowledge of one another, and all expectations are fulfilled. This pre?harmonization of individual plans does not occur in real?world markets where decisions must be taken in ignorance of one another. The Austrian school grants this, but claims that real?world price systems are nonetheless effective in coordinating saving and investment decisions, which are motivated by disparate considerations. In contrast, Keynes held that without the pre?reconciliation of (...)
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  36. Dawn B. Neill (2011). Urbanization and Daughter-Biased Parental Investment in Fiji. Human Nature 22 (1-2):139-155.score: 24.0
    Parental investment decisions guide parental actions regarding children’s productive work and are shaped by ecological context. Urban ecology enhances long-term payoffs to investment in human capital, increasing opportunity costs for work performed by children, and decreased workload should result. Using an embodied capital framework, self-reported data on urban and rural Indo-Fijian children’s work activities are compared. Results show higher workloads for older children, rural children, and girls. High scholastic achievement is associated with lower workloads for girls, but not (...)
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  37. Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos. Continent 1 (3):201-207.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising mainly (...)
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  38. Philipp Bagus & & David Howden, 18. “Unanswered Quibbles with Fractional Reserve Free Banking”.score: 24.0
    In this article we reply to George Selgin’s counterarguments to our article “Fractional Reserve Free Banking: Some Quibbles”. Selgin regards holding cash as saving while we focus on the real savings necessary to maintain investment projects. Real savings are unconsumed real income. Variations in real savings are not [...].
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  39. Lee Cronk (1991). Preferential Parental Investment in Daughters Over Sons. Human Nature 2 (4):387-417.score: 24.0
    Female-biased parental investment is unusual but not unknown in human societies. Relevant explanatory models include Fisher’s principle, the Trivers-Willard model, local mate and resource competition and enhancement, and economic rational actor models. Possible evidence of female-biased parental investment includes sex ratios, mortality rates, parents’ stated preferences for offspring of one sex, and direct and indirect measurements of actual parental behavior. Possible examples of female-biased parental investment include the Mukogodo of Kenya, the Ifalukese of Micronesia, the Cheyenne of (...)
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  40. Bastien Drut (2010). Sovereign Bonds and Socially Responsible Investment. Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):131 - 145.score: 24.0
    This article investigates how the meanvariance efficient frontier defined by sovereign bonds of 20 developed countries is affected by the consideration of socially responsible indicators for countries in investment decision-making. For a global rating of socially responsible performances, we show that it is possible to build portfolios with an increased average rating without significantly harming the risk/return relationship. This result differs when considering sub-ratings related to the environment, social concerns and public governance. The results are good news for responsible (...)
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  41. Ruth Klüser (2009). Current Challenges for Efficient Electricity Grids. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (3-4):265-271.score: 24.0
    The comprehensive liberalisation of the electricity market at the end of the last century has initiated a dynamic development. The politically determined disjunction of the network operation from generation, commerce and distribution which broke open the value added chain concerning the business organisation is to induce competition and consequently lower prices. Thus, besides a secure electricity supply, profitability, efficiency, quality and environmental aspects constitute present aims and have led to an enormous increase of complexity in the power supply. Furthermore, the (...)
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  42. Chris Mallin & Kean Ow-Yong (2010). The UK Alternative Investment Market — Ethical Dimensions. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):223 - 239.score: 24.0
    The UK Alternative Investment Market (AIM) was launched in 1995 and has been a great success with over 1200 companies now listed. In this article, we examine the development of AIM as it reaches its 15th year and discuss the potential pitfalls of the light touch regulation that is one of the attractions of AIM and identify potential corporate governance and ethical issues that may arise as a result of light touch regulation. We examine the central role of the (...)
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  43. Elizabeth Ooi & Paul Lajbcygier (2013). Virtue Remains After Removing Sin: Finding Skill Amongst Socially Responsible Investment Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):199-224.score: 24.0
    We examine the investment skill of socially responsible investment (SRI) fund managers. Prior studies use the ‘alpha’ from standard asset pricing models as a proxy for management skill. However, implicit in the use of such models is that managers operate under no investment constraints. In the SRI context, this is patently false and can lead to biased alpha estimates and false conclusions about the existence of skill. We introduce a novel three-factor Fama–French asset-pricing model with the aim (...)
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  44. Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos. Continent 1 (3):201-207.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising mainly (...)
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  45. Yin-Hua Yeh, Tsun-Siou Lee & Pei-Gi Shu (2008). The Agency Problems Embedded in Firm's Equity Investment. Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1/2):151 - 166.score: 24.0
    We find that agency problems are embedded in firm's excess and abnormal equity investments that are mainly dictated by controlling shareholder's motives and ethical choices manifested in ownership and board structure. The excess equity investment is gauged with respect to industry average. The abnormal equity investment is specifically referred to the number of nominal investment companies that are fully controlled by the controlling owners while subject to little governance. Our empirical evidences of 345 Taiwanese non-financial listed firms (...)
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  46. Alfredo M. Bobillo, Juan A. Rodriguez Sanz & Fernando Tejerina Gaite (2009). Investment Decisions, Liquidity, and Institutional Activism: An International Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):25 - 40.score: 24.0
    The activism of institutional investors tends more and more toward the supervision and control of the behavior of the managers of big companies. In this article, we present a model based on the creation of an activism index that lets us evaluate such activism's effect on the sensitivity of the investment policies of a company in the face of financial variables (such as cash flow and liquidity ratio) and market variables (ownership concentration and value creation index). To test our (...)
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  47. Ruth Breeze (2012). Dissenting and Concurring Opinions in International Investment Arbitration: How the Arbitrators Frame Their Need to Differ. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (3):393-413.score: 24.0
    Though still relatively infrequent, the issuing of dissenting and concurring opinions is becoming more common in international investment arbitration. This paper reviews the reasons for delivering separate opinions envisaged in the bibliography on investment arbitration, comparing these with practices in the related area of commercial arbitration. Fourteen recent separate opinions appended to ICSID arbitration awards and decisions are then analysed to determine how the arbitrators themselves explain why they have taken the drastic step of issuing a separate opinion. (...)
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  48. Judith Semon Dubas, Marianne Heijkoop & Marcel A. G. Van Aken (2009). A Preliminary Investigation of Parent–Progeny Olfactory Recognition and Parental Investment. Human Nature 20 (1):80-92.score: 24.0
    The role of olfaction in kin recognition and parental investment is documented in many mammalian/vertebrate species. Research on humans, however, has only focused on whether parents are able to recognize their children by smell, not whether humans use these cues for investment decisions. Here we show that fathers exhibit more affection and attachment and fewer ignoring behaviors toward children whose smell they can identify than toward those whose smell they cannot recognize. Thus, olfaction might serve as a means (...)
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  49. Mhairi A. Gibson (2008). Does Investment in the Sexes Differ When Fathers Are Absent? Human Nature 19 (3):263-276.score: 24.0
    This study examines child survival and growth in a patrilineal Ethiopian community as a function of father absence and sex. In line with evolutionary predictions for sex-biased parental investment, the absence of a father and associated constraints on household resources is more detrimental for sons’ than daughters’ survival in infancy. Father absence doubles a son’s risk of dying in infancy but has a positive influence on the well-being of female members of the household, improving daughter survival, growth, and maternal (...)
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  50. Jean-Pascal Gond & Eva Boxenbaum (2013). The Glocalization of Responsible Investment: Contextualization Work in France and Québec. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):707-721.score: 24.0
    This study investigates the institutional work that underlies the diffusion of responsible investment (RI) and enhances its adaptation to local settings. Building on institutional theory and actor–network theory, we advance the concept of contextualization work to describe the institutional work that sustains RI glocalization. Empirical data from two case studies highlight how entrepreneurial actors imported the notion of RI from the US to France and Québec. Our findings uncover three types of contextualization work—filtering, repurposing, and coupling—that sustain RI glocalization, (...)
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