Search results for 'School children Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John White (2011). Exploring Well-Being in Schools: A Guide to Making Children's Lives More Fulfilling. Routledge.score: 234.0
  2. Philipp Ruhnau, Björn Herrmann, Burkhard Maess, Jens Brauer, Angela Dorkas Friederici & Erich Schröger (2013). Processing of Complex Distracting Sounds in School-Aged Children and Adults: Evidence From EEG and MEG Data. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 225.0
    When a perceiver performs a task, rarely occurring sounds often have a distracting effect on task performance. The neural mismatch responses in event-related potentials to such distracting stimuli depend on age. Adults commonly show a negative response, whereas in children a positive as well as a negative mismatch response has been reported. Using electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG), here we investigated the developmental changes of distraction processing in school-aged children (9–10 years) and adults. Participants took part in an (...)
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  3. F. L. Goodenough (1926). Racial Differences in the Intelligence of School Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 9 (5):388.score: 219.0
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  4. J. Dennis Nolan & Leah V. Pendarvis (1970). Effects of Variable-Irrelevant Dimensions on the Discrimination Reversal Learning of Nursery School Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (3):428.score: 219.0
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  5. Stephan Bongard Ingo Roden, Gunter Kreutz (2012). Effects of a School-Based Instrumental Music Program on Verbal and Visual Memory in Primary School Children: A Longitudinal Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 195.0
    This study examined the effects of a school-based instrumental training program on the development of verbal and visual memory skills in primary school children. Participants either took part in a music program with weekly 45 minutes sessions of instrumental lessons in small groups at school, or they received extended natural science training. A third group of children did not receive additional training. Each child completed verbal and visual memory tests for three times over a period (...)
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  6. Jan Lonnemann, Janosch Linkersdörfer, Marcus Hasselhorn & Sven Lindberg (2013). Developmental Changes in the Association Between Approximate Number Representations and Addition Skills in Elementary School Children. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 195.0
    The approximate number system (ANS) is assumingly related to mathematical learning but evidence supporting this assumption is mixed. The inconsistent findings might be attributed to the fact that different measures have been used to assess the ANS and mathematical skills. Moreover, associations between the performance on a measure of the ANS and mathematical skills may be discontinuous, i.e. stronger for children with lower math scores than for children with higher math scores, and may change with age. The aim (...)
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  7. Harvey M. Lacey (1961). Mediating Verbal Responses and Stimulus Similarity as Factors in Conceptual Naming by School Age Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (2):113.score: 189.0
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  8. Stefan Huber, Ursula Fischer, Korbinian Moeller & Hans-Christoph Nuerk (2013). On the Interrelation of Multiplication and Division in Secondary School Children. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 177.0
    Multiplication and division are conceptually inversely related: Each division problem can be transformed into as a multiplication problem and vice versa. Recent research has indicated strong developmental parallels between multiplication and division in primary school children. In this study, we were interested in (i) whether these developmental parallels persist into secondary school, (ii) whether similar developmental parallels can be observed for simple and complex problems, (iii) whether skill level modulates this relationship, and (iv) whether the correlations are (...)
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  9. Jan Kühnhausen, Anja Leonhardt, Judith Dirk & Florian Schmiedek (2013). Physical Activity and Affect in Elementary School Children's Daily Lives. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 162.0
    A positive influence of physical activity (PA) on affect has been shown in numerous studies. However, this relationship has not yet been studied in the daily life of children. We present a part of the FLUX study that attempts to contribute to filling that gap. To this end, a proper way to measure PA and affect in the daily life of children is needed. In pre-studies of the FLUX study, we were able to show that affect can be (...)
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  10. Florence L. Goodenough & Clara L. Brian (1929). Certain Factors Underlying the Acquisition of Motor Skill by Pre-School Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (2):127.score: 153.0
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  11. David Morrison, Sharinaz Hassan, Rosanna Mary Rooney, Robert Kane, Clare Roberts & Vincent Mancini (2013). Prevention of Internalising Disorders in 9-10 Year Old Children: Efficacy of the Aussie Optimism Positive Thinking Skills Program at 30-Month Follow-Up. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Psychology 4:988.score: 150.0
    The Aussie Optimism: Positive Thinking Skills Program (AOP-PTS) is an innovative curriculum-based mental health promotion program based on cognitive and behavioural strategies. The program is aimed at preventing depressive and anxiety symptoms and disorders in middle primary school children aged 9-10 years. Students from 22 low SES primary schools (N = 910) were randomly assigned to an intervention or a control group and assessed at the 30-month follow-up. The intervention group received the program implemented by teachers and the (...)
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  12. Eva Turner (2010). Technology Use in Reporting to Parents of Primary School Children. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (3):25-37.score: 140.0
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  13. Harl R. Douglass (1925). The Development of Number Concept in Children of Pre-School and Kindergarten Ages. Journal of Experimental Psychology 8 (6):443.score: 135.0
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  14. Nobu Shirai, Tomoko Imura, Rio Tamura & Takeharu Seno (2014). Stronger Vection in Junior High School Children Than in Adults. Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 135.0
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  15. Howard H. Kendler & Tracy S. Kendler (1956). Inferential Behavior in Preschool Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (5):311.score: 120.0
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  16. Harold W. Stevenson & Morton W. Weir (1959). Variables Affecting Children's Performance in a Probability Learning Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 57 (6):403.score: 120.0
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  17. Nigel Foreman, Danaë Stanton, Paul Wilson & Hester Duffy (2003). Spatial Knowledge of a Real School Environment Acquired From Virtual or Physical Models by Able-Bodied Children and Children with Physical Disabilities. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 9 (2):67.score: 117.0
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  18. Corinna F. Grindle, Richard P. Hastings, Maria Saville, J. Carl Hughes, Hanna Kovshoff & Kathleen Huxley, Integrating Evidence-Based Behavioural Teaching Methods Into Education for Children with Autism.score: 114.0
    An educational provision for young children with autism that offers intensive behavioural intervention based on the principles of Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA), within an early years mainstream school setting in the UK, is described. The ABA Class at Westwood School is a collaborative project between the School of Psychology, Bangor University, two Local Education Authorities in North East Wales (Flintshire and Wrexham) and the local NHS Trust. Using two case examples, two important features of mainstream (...)
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  19. Audrey Croucher & Ivan Reid (2006). Internalised Achievement Responsibility as a Factor in Primary School Children's Achievement. Educational Studies 5 (2):179-189.score: 112.0
    (1979). Internalised Achievement Responsibility as a Factor in Primary School Children's Achievement. Educational Studies: Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 179-189.
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  20. Paul Croll, Gaynor Attwood, Carol Fuller & Kathryn Last (2008). The Structure and Implications of Children's Attitudes to School. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (4):382 - 399.score: 108.0
    The paper reports a study of children's attitudes to school based on a questionnaire survey of 845 pupils in their first year of secondary school in England, together with interviews with a sample of the children. A clearly structured set of attitudes emerged from a factor analysis which showed a distinction between instrumental and affective aspects of attitudes but also dimensions within these, including a sense of teacher commitment and school as a difficult environment. Virtually (...)
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  21. Dennis Krebs & Bert Sturrup (1982). Role‐Taking Ability and Altruistic Behaviour in Elementary School Children. Journal of Moral Education 11 (2):94-100.score: 108.0
    Abstract Twenty?four second? and third?grade children were given two cognitively?based role?taking tests developed by Flavell et al. (1968). The children's social behaviour was observed over a two?month period. It was coded according to a scheme introduced by the anthropologists Whiting and Whiting (1975) which produces composite scores of egoism and altruism. Teachers rated the children's social behaviour and role?taking ability. IQ scores were obtained from school records. Tests of the reliability and validity of the measures of (...)
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  22. C. C. W. Yu, Scarlet Chan, Frances Cheng, R. Y. T. Sung & Kit‐Tai Hau (2006). Are Physical Activity and Academic Performance Compatible? Academic Achievement, Conduct, Physical Activity and Self‐Esteem of Hong Kong Chinese Primary School Children. Educational Studies 32 (4):331-341.score: 108.0
    Education is so strongly emphasized in the Chinese culture that academic success is widely regarded as the only indicator of success, while too much physical activity is often discouraged because it drains energy and affects academic concentration. This study investigated the relations among academic achievement, self?esteem, school conduct and physical activity level. The participants were 333 Chinese pre?adolescents (aged 8?12) in Hong Kong. Examination results and conduct grades were obtained from the school records. Global self?esteem was measured with (...)
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  23. Eva Johansson (2001). Morality in Children's Worlds €“ Rationality of Thought or Values Emanating From Relations? Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (4):345-358.score: 102.0
    The topic of this article is morality among pre-school children.Two different theories of morality, morality as lived and morality asrationality of thought, are analyzed with a special view to exploringtheir respective consequences for doing research on small children'smorality. Children's lived morality is then interpreted and discussed interms of rights.
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  24. Andrea Beetz (2013). Socio-Emotional Correlates of a Schooldog-Teacher-Team in the Classroom. Frontiers in Psychology 4:886.score: 102.0
    A growing number of teachers in Europe regularly take their dogs with them into the classroom. Limited research points at positive socio-emotional effects of this practice. In this study the effects of a schooldog-teacher-team on socioemotional experiences in school, depression and emotion regulation strategies were investigated in a classroom of third-graders (male n=12, female n=13), which had a schooldog present for one day per week in comparison with a control class (male n=11, female n=10). In contrast to the control (...)
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  25. Gill Valentine (1999). Being Seen and Heard? The Ethical Complexities of Working with Children and Young People at Home and at School. Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):141 – 155.score: 96.0
    In the late 1980s and early 1990s a number of key writers within sociology and anthropology criticised much of the existing research on children within the social sciences as 'adultist'. This has subsequently provoked attempts by academics to define new ways of working with , not on or for, children that have been characterised by a desire to define more mutuality between adult and children in research relationships and to identify new ways that researchers can engage with (...)
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  26. John F. Kihlstrom (2004). Is There a “People Are Stupid” School in Social Psychology? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):348-348.score: 96.0
    This commentary notes the emergence of a “People are Stupid” school of thought that describes social behavior as mindless, automatic, and unconscious. I trace the roots of this “school,” particularly in the link between situationism in social psychology and behaviorism in psychology at large, and suggest that social psychology should focus on the role of the mind in social interaction.
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  27. Georgiana Shick Tryon (2000). Ethical Transgressions of School Psychology Graduate Students: A Critical Incidents Survey. Ethics and Behavior 10 (3):271 – 279.score: 96.0
    This study examines ethical transgressions of school psychology graduate students using the critical incidents technique. Program directors of school psychology programs listed in the Directory of School Psychology Graduate Programs (Thomas, 1998) were asked to describe ethical violations committed by their students during the past 5 years. Violations dealt primarily with issues involving confidentiality, competence, and professional and academic honesty. Directors believed that the majority of students would not find most ethical issues problematic. Implications (...)
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  28. Georgiana Shick Tryon (2001). School Psychology Students' Beliefs About Their Preparation and Concern with Ethical Issues. Ethics and Behavior 11 (4):375 – 394.score: 96.0
    This study investigated school psychology doctoral students' beliefs concerning their preparation for, and concern about, dealing with 12 ethical issues based on year in graduate school and whether they had taken an ethics course. Two hundred thirty-three doctoral students from 18 of the 44 American Psychological Association accredited programs in school psychology listed in the December 1996 issue of the American Psychologist completed ethical issues surveys. Results showed that students who had taken an ethics course (...)
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  29. Robert Henley Woody (2011). Science in Mental Health Training and Practice, With Special Reference to School Psychology. Ethics and Behavior 21 (1):69-77.score: 96.0
    The first words in the inaugural version of the American Psychological Association Ethical Standards of Psychologists (1953) declared, ?Psychology is a science? (p. v). Professional ethics for all of the mental health disciplines support science (and objectivity) for knowledge and practice. Using school psychology as an example, consideration is given to the presence of science and research in the scientist-practitioner, professional practitioner, and psychoeducational training and practice models. Although none of the three models truly ignores a commitment (...)
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  30. Tila Tabea Brink, Karolina Urton, Dada Held, Evgeniya Kirilina, Markus Hofmann, Gisela Klann-Delius, Arthur M. Jacobs & Lars Kuchinke (2011). The Role of Orbitofrontal Cortex in Processing Empathy Stories in 4- to 8-Year-Old Children. Frontiers in Psychology 2:80.score: 96.0
    This study investigates the neuronal correlates of empathic processing in children aged 4 to 8 years, an age range discussed to be crucial for the development of empathy. Empathy, defined as the ability to understand and share another person’s inner life, consists of two components: affective (emotion-sharing) and cognitive empathy (Theory of Mind). We examined the hemodynamic responses of pre-school and school children (N=48), while they processed verbal (auditory) and non-verbal (cartoons) empathy stories in a passive (...)
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  31. Alan Gordon (2001). School Exclusions in England: Children's Voices and Adult Solutions? Educational Studies 27 (1):69-85.score: 96.0
    This paper examines the rise in school exclusions in England in the 1990s. It discusses the definitions and different types of exclusion and how policies towards exclusion have been changing. It considers the groups of students that have been, and remain, at the greatest risk of exclusion and the main reasons given by schools for excluding students. Particular attention is focused on the views of excluded children themselves, collated from a wide range of studies, including primary research with (...)
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  32. Chih‐Lun Hung & Kevin Marjoribanks * (2005). Parents, Teachers and Children's School Outcomes: A Taiwanese Study. Educational Studies 31 (1):3-13.score: 96.0
    The study examined relationships among family social status, perceptions of family and school learning environments, and measures of children?s academic achievement, educational aspirations and self?concept. Data were collected from 261 (128 boys, 133 girls) 11?year?old Taiwanese children. The findings from structural equation modelling suggest that: (a) family social status continues to have an unmediated association with children?s academic achievement, but its relationship to educational aspirations and self?concept is mediated by children?s perceptions of their more immediate (...)
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  33. Bhoomika Kar, Shobini Rao, B. A. Chandramouli & K. Thennarasu (2011). Growth Patterns of Neuropsychological Functions in Indian Children. Frontiers in Psychology 2:240-240.score: 96.0
    We investigated age-related differences in neuropsychological performance in 400 Indian school children (5-15 years of age). Functions of motor speed, attention, executive functions, visuospatial functions, comprehension, learning and memory were examined. Growth curve analysis was performed. Different growth models fitted different cognitive functions. Neuropsychological task performance improved slowly between 5-7 years, moderately between 8-12 years and again slowly between 13-15 years. The overall growth patterns of neuropsychological functions in Indian children have also been discussed with the findings (...)
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  34. Diane Reay & Helen Lucey (2000). Children, School Choice and Social Differences. Educational Studies 26 (1):83-100.score: 96.0
    Research into school choice has focused primarily on parental perspectives. In contrast, this study directly explores children's experiences as they are going through the secondary school choice process in two inner London primary schools. While there were important commonalities in children's experience, in this paper we have concentrated on the differences. These, we argue, lay in (a) children's material and social circumstances, (b) children's individuality, and (c) the ways in which power is played out (...)
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  35. Majda Schmidt & Branka Čagran (2006). Classroom Climate in Regular Primary School Settings with Children with Special Needs. Educational Studies 32 (4):361-372.score: 96.0
    This study investigates the classroom climate in two settings of the 6th?grade class (a setting of children with special needs and a setting without children with special needs), focusing on aspects of satisfaction and cohesiveness on one side and friction, competitiveness and difficulties on the other. The study results indicate the existence of both positive and negative consequences of the integration of hearing?impaired pupils. Heterogeneity achieved by the presence of children with special needs included positive benefits for (...)
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  36. A. Burton (1943). Behavioral Characteristics of Monotony in Two Age Groups. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (4):323.score: 93.0
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  37. A. L. Edwards & H. B. English (1939). Reminiscence in Relation to Differential Difficulty. Journal of Experimental Psychology 25 (1):100.score: 93.0
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  38. William W. Lambert, Elisabeth C. Lambert & Peter D. Watson (1953). Acquisition and Extinction of an Instrumental Response Sequence in the Token-Reward Situation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 45 (5):321.score: 93.0
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  39. Sonia F. Osler & Grace E. Trautman (1961). Concept Attainment: II. Effect of Stimulus Complexity Upon Concept Attainment at Two Levels of Intelligence. Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (1):9.score: 93.0
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  40. Harold M. Schroder (1956). Development and Maintenance of the Preference Value of an Object. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (2):139.score: 93.0
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  41. S. W. Calhoon (1934). Relative Seating Position and Ability to Reproduce Disconnected Word Lists After Short Intervals of Time. Journal of Experimental Psychology 17 (5):709.score: 93.0
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  42. H. E. Jones (1945). Trial and Error Learning with Differential Cues. Journal of Experimental Psychology 35 (1):31.score: 93.0
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  43. William W. Lambert, Richard L. Solomon & Peter D. Watson (1949). Reinforcement and Extinction as Factors in Size Estimation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (5):637.score: 93.0
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  44. Joseph J. Kockelmans (ed.) (1987). Phenomenological Psychology: The Dutch School. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 90.0
    Husserl's Original View on Phenomenological Psychology* JOSEPH J.KOCKELMANS Some forty years ago Edmund Husserl spoke publicly for the first time of a ...
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  45. Miriam Dittmar, Kirsten Abbot‐Smith, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2014). Familiar Verbs Are Not Always Easier Than Novel Verbs: How German Pre‐School Children Comprehend Active and Passive Sentences. Cognitive Science 38 (1):128-151.score: 90.0
    Many studies show a developmental advantage for transitive sentences with familiar verbs over those with novel verbs. It might be that once familiar verbs become entrenched in particular constructions, they would be more difficult to understand (than would novel verbs) in non-prototypical constructions. We provide support for this hypothesis investigating German children using a forced-choice pointing paradigm with reversed agent-patient roles. We tested active transitive verbs in study 1. The 2-year olds were better with familiar than novel verbs, while (...)
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  46. Carmen L. Vidal Rodeiro, Joanne L. Emery & John F. Bell (2011). Emotional Intelligence and Academic Attainment of British Secondary School Children: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Educational Studies 38 (5):521-539.score: 90.0
    Trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) covers a wide range of self-perceived skills and personality dispositions such as motivation, confidence, optimism, peer relations and coping with stress. In the last few years, there has been a growing awareness that social and emotional factors play an important part in students? academic success and it has been claimed that those with high scores on a trait EI measure perform better. This research investigated whether scores on a questionnaire measure of trait EI were related (...)
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  47. Mirjam Weis, Tobias Heikamp & Gisela Trommsdorff (2013). Gender Differences in School Achievement: The Role of Self-Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
    This study examined whether different aspects of self-regulation (i.e., emotion and behavior regulation) account for gender differences in German and mathematics achievement. Specifically, we investigated whether higher school achievement by girls in comparison to boys can be explained by self-regulation. German and mathematics achievement were assessed in a sample of 53 German fifth graders (19 boys, 34 girls) using formal academic performance tests (i.e., reading, writing, mathematics) and teachers’ ratings (i.e., grades in German and mathematics). Moreover, teachers rated (...)’s behavior regulation using the Self-Control Scale (SCS-K-D). Children’s self-reported strategies of emotion regulation were assessed with the Questionnaire for the Measurement of Stress and Coping in Children and Adolescents (SSKJ 3-8). Age and intelligence (CFT 20-R) were included as control variables. Analyses of mean differences showed that girls outperformed boys in German achievement and behavior regulation. Regression analyses, using a bootstrapping method, revealed that relations between gender and German achievement were mediated by behavior regulation. Furthermore, we found a suppression effect of behavior regulation on the relation between gender and mathematics achievement: boys’ mathematics achievement was underestimated when the analyses did not control for behavior regulation. We discuss these results from a developmental perspective and within the theoretical framework of self-regulation and achievement. (shrink)
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  48. Pierre-Yves Brandt (2013). Berguer, Rochedieu: Flournoy's Legacy in the Genevan School of the Psychology of Religion. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 35 (1):31-46.score: 90.0
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  49. Louis deRosset (2010). Reference and Response. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 99999 (1):1-18.score: 87.0
    A standard view of reference holds that a speaker's use of a name refers to a certain thing in virtue of the speaker's associating a condition with that use that singles the referent out. This view has been criticized by Saul Kripke as empirically inadequate. Recently, however, it has been argued that a version of the standard view, a _response-based theory of reference_, survives the charge of empirical inadequacy by allowing that associated conditions may be largely or even entirely implicit. (...)
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  50. Helmuth Feilke (1996). From Syntactical to Textual Strategies of Argumentation. Argumentation 10 (2):197-212.score: 87.0
    The paper focuses on tevelopmental relations between syntactical complexity, cohesion — especially conjuctional connection — and textual coherence in a sample of 150 argumentative texts written by school children (grades 4, 7, 10 and 12) and young adults (university students). In common sense and even in linguistics and psychology written text and especially written argument has been taken to be the prototype of syntactically complex, self-contained and explicit text over a long period of research on the topic. (...)
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