Search results for 'School children Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    F. L. Goodenough (1926). Racial Differences in the Intelligence of School Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 9 (5):388.
  2. J. Dennis Nolan & Leah V. Pendarvis (1970). Effects of Variable-Irrelevant Dimensions on the Discrimination Reversal Learning of Nursery School Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (3):428.
  3.  1
    Harvey M. Lacey (1961). Mediating Verbal Responses and Stimulus Similarity as Factors in Conceptual Naming by School Age Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (2):113.
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  4. Melissa A. Bray & Thomas J. Kehle (2013). The Oxford Handbook of School Psychology. Oxford University Press Usa.
    With its roots in clinical and educational psychology, school psychology is an ever-changing field that encompasses a diversity of topics. The Oxford Handbook of School Psychology synthesizes the most vital and relevant literature in all of these areas, producing a state-of-the-art, authoritative resource for practitioners, researchers, and parents.Comprising chapters authored by the leading figures in school psychology, The Oxford Handbook of School Psychology focuses on the significant issues, new developments, and scientific (...)
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  5. John White (2011). Exploring Well-Being in Schools: A Guide to Making Children's Lives More Fulfilling. Routledge.
  6.  2
    Florence L. Goodenough & Clara L. Brian (1929). Certain Factors Underlying the Acquisition of Motor Skill by Pre-School Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (2):127.
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  7. Natesh Babu, H. R. Nagendra & Balaram Pradhana (2013). A Comparative Study on Two Yogic Relaxation Techniques on Anxiety in School Children. International Journal of Yoga - Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology 1 (2):65.
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  8. W. H. Winch, Ernest Ebert & E. Meumann (1905). Immediate Memory in School-Children. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (5):136-138.
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  9.  3
    Harl R. Douglass (1925). The Development of Number Concept in Children of Pre-School and Kindergarten Ages. Journal of Experimental Psychology 8 (6):443.
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  10.  2
    Eva Turner (2010). Technology Use in Reporting to Parents of Primary School Children. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (3):25-37.
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  11.  1
    Nigel Foreman, Danaë Stanton, Paul Wilson & Hester Duffy (2003). Spatial Knowledge of a Real School Environment Acquired From Virtual or Physical Models by Able-Bodied Children and Children with Physical Disabilities. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 9 (2):67.
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  12.  1
    Hilary Cremin & Barbara Slatter (2004). Is It Possible to Access the ‘Voice’ of Pre‐School Children? Results of a Research Project in a Pre‐School Setting. Educational Studies 30 (4):457-470.
    This paper presents a rationale for consulting with very young children to enable their voices to be heard, and taken into consideration, when planning pre‐school provision. It goes on to suggest that the expressed preferences of pre‐school children can be taken as an accurate account of their thoughts and feelings. This is tested through a case study of six 4‐year‐olds in a nursery setting. The research enabled a comparison to be made between what the children (...)
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  13.  1
    Audrey Croucher & Ivan Reid (2006). Internalised Achievement Responsibility as a Factor in Primary School Children's Achievement. Educational Studies 5 (2):179-189.
    (1979). Internalised Achievement Responsibility as a Factor in Primary School Children's Achievement. Educational Studies: Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 179-189.
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  14. Harold F. Burks (2008). Diagnosis and Remediation Practices for Troubled School Children. R&L Education.
    In this resource for educators, Harold F. Burks offers a comprehensive guide to the evaluation techniques and intervention strategies that have worked with many school children experiencing problems. Thus, Diagnosis and Remediation Practices for Troubled School Children attempts to: clarify the understanding of observed, unwanted child behavior symptoms ; investigate with educators and parents—and sometimes children—the possible causal factors that antedate these behavior manifestations; create in cooperation with parents and school personnel, innovative intervention techniques (...)
     
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  15. Eva Marsal & Takara Dobashi (2007). I And My Family - Comparing The Reflective Competence Of Japanese And German Primary School Children As Related To The “ethics Of Care”. Childhood and Philosophy 3:267-287.
    This paper compares the concepts of Japanese and German primary school children as they relate to the “ethics of care.” To do this we have used the research methodology of expanding and replicating an experiment to test whether the results can be interculturally confirmed. In our design we replicated the experiment in children’s philosophy on the question “What are Family Ties?” carried out by Toshiaki Ôse in September 2002 with the 5th grade of the municipal .primary (...) Hamanogô in Chigasaki. (shrink)
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  16.  4
    C. C. W. Yu, Scarlet Chan, Frances Cheng, R. Y. T. Sung & Kit‐Tai Hau (2006). Are Physical Activity and Academic Performance Compatible? Academic Achievement, Conduct, Physical Activity and Self‐Esteem of Hong Kong Chinese Primary School Children. Educational Studies 32 (4):331-341.
    Education is so strongly emphasized in the Chinese culture that academic success is widely regarded as the only indicator of success, while too much physical activity is often discouraged because it drains energy and affects academic concentration. This study investigated the relations among academic achievement, self?esteem, school conduct and physical activity level. The participants were 333 Chinese pre?adolescents (aged 8?12) in Hong Kong. Examination results and conduct grades were obtained from the school records. Global self?esteem was measured with (...)
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  17.  4
    Dennis Krebs & Bert Sturrup (1982). Role‐Taking Ability and Altruistic Behaviour in Elementary School Children. Journal of Moral Education 11 (2):94-100.
    Abstract Twenty?four second? and third?grade children were given two cognitively?based role?taking tests developed by Flavell et al. (1968). The children's social behaviour was observed over a two?month period. It was coded according to a scheme introduced by the anthropologists Whiting and Whiting (1975) which produces composite scores of egoism and altruism. Teachers rated the children's social behaviour and role?taking ability. IQ scores were obtained from school records. Tests of the reliability and validity of the measures of (...)
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  18.  7
    Paul Croll, Gaynor Attwood, Carol Fuller & Kathryn Last (2008). The Structure and Implications of Children's Attitudes to School. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (4):382 - 399.
    The paper reports a study of children's attitudes to school based on a questionnaire survey of 845 pupils in their first year of secondary school in England, together with interviews with a sample of the children. A clearly structured set of attitudes emerged from a factor analysis which showed a distinction between instrumental and affective aspects of attitudes but also dimensions within these, including a sense of teacher commitment and school as a difficult environment. Virtually (...)
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  19.  47
    Miriam Dittmar, Kirsten Abbot‐Smith, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2014). Familiar Verbs Are Not Always Easier Than Novel Verbs: How German Pre‐School Children Comprehend Active and Passive Sentences. Cognitive Science 38 (1):128-151.
    Many studies show a developmental advantage for transitive sentences with familiar verbs over those with novel verbs. It might be that once familiar verbs become entrenched in particular constructions, they would be more difficult to understand (than would novel verbs) in non-prototypical constructions. We provide support for this hypothesis investigating German children using a forced-choice pointing paradigm with reversed agent-patient roles. We tested active transitive verbs in study 1. The 2-year olds were better with familiar than novel verbs, while (...)
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  20.  1
    Michael J. Boulton (2006). Aggressive Fighting in British Middle School Children. Educational Studies 19 (1):19-39.
    In study 1, the time when aggressive fighting involving 8 and 11 year‐old children took place was examined by means of direct playground observations during lunch‐time recess. There was a tendency, significant in the younger group, for there to have been more fights in the last quarter of recess. In study 2, the causes of fights, the sex of the participants, the proportion of fights that were escalated by other children joining in in a non‐conciliatory way, and the (...)
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  21.  1
    M. Boulton (1993). Aggressive Fighting in British Middle School Children. Educational Studies 19 (1):19439.
    In study 1, the time when aggressive fighting involving 8 and 11 year‐old children took place was examined by means of direct playground observations during lunch‐time recess. There was a tendency, significant in the younger group, for there to have been more fights in the last quarter of recess. In study 2, the causes of fights, the sex of the participants, the proportion of fights that were escalated by other children joining in in a non‐conciliatory way, and the (...)
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  22.  2
    Geoffrey Short (1991). Perceptions of Inequality: Primary School Children's Discourse on Social Class. Educational Studies 17 (1):89-106.
    This paper is concerned with the role of education in promoting social justice. It deals specifically with the development of children's understanding of social class, not because this particular form of inequality is considered more important than any other, but because of the inadequacies of extant research. It is argued that unless we know how children think about social class differentiation, we will not be able to engage effectively with their misconceptions. One hundred and sixty‐one children drawn (...)
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  23.  1
    Carmen L. Vidal Rodeiro, Joanne L. Emery & John F. Bell (2011). Emotional Intelligence and Academic Attainment of British Secondary School Children: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Educational Studies 38 (5):521-539.
    Trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) covers a wide range of self-perceived skills and personality dispositions such as motivation, confidence, optimism, peer relations and coping with stress. In the last few years, there has been a growing awareness that social and emotional factors play an important part in students? academic success and it has been claimed that those with high scores on a trait EI measure perform better. This research investigated whether scores on a questionnaire measure of trait EI were related (...)
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  24. Eva Marsal & Takara Dobashi (2011). Children’s Drawings As Expressions Of “NARRATIVE Philosophizing” Concepts Of Death A Comparison Of German And Japanese Elementary School Children. Childhood and Philosophy 7:251-269.
    One of Kant’s famous questions about being human asks, “What may I hope?” This question places individual life within an encompassing horizon of human history and speculates on the possibility of perspectives beyond death. In our time mortality is generally repressed, though the development of personal consciousness is closely linked to realization of one’s finitude. This raises especially urgent questions for children, and they are left to deal with them alone. From the time awareness begins, knowledge that death can (...)
     
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  25. Jane Lewis, Cathy Finnegan & Anne West (2011). Issues in the Development of Children’s Centres on Nursery and Primary School Sites. Educational Studies 37 (4):435-445.
    This paper explores the development of children’s centres in England between 2004 and 2008, focusing on the newly created centres that have been located on primary and nursery school sites. Using both an analysis of policy documents and interview data from three urban local authorities, we examine the use of premises and the differing priorities of centre staff and school heads, particularly in relation to the balance of services between early years education, childcare and family support. We (...)
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  26.  19
    Laurence Picard, Isméry Reffuveille, Francis Eustache & Pascale Piolino (2009). Development of Autonoetic Autobiographical Memory in School-Age Children: Genuine Age Effect or Development of Basic Cognitive Abilities? Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):864-876.
    This study investigated the mechanisms behind episodic autobiographical memory development in school-age children. Thirty children performed a novel EAM test. We computed one index of episodicity via autonoetic consciousness and two indices of retrieval spontaneity for a recent period and a more remote one . Executive functions, and episodic and personal semantic memory were assessed. Results showed that recent autobiographical memories were mainly episodic, unlike remote ones. An age-related increase in the indices of episodicity and specific spontaneity (...)
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  27.  9
    Hannes Rakoczy (forthcoming). In Defense of a Developmental Dogma: Children Acquire Propositional Attitude Folk Psychology Around Age 4. Synthese:1-19.
    When do children acquire a propositional attitude folk psychology or theory of mind? The orthodox answer to this central question of developmental ToM research had long been that around age 4 children begin to apply “belief” and other propositional attitude concepts. This orthodoxy has recently come under serious attack, though, from two sides: Scoffers complain that it over-estimates children’s early competence and claim that a proper understanding of propositional attitudes emerges only much later. Boosters criticize the (...)
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  28.  2
    Kevin Mcdonough (2007). The ‘Futures’ of Queer Children and the Common School Ideal. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):795–810.
    This paper focuses on an especially urgent challenge to the legitimacy of the common school ideal—a challenge that has hardly been addressed within contemporary debates within liberal philosophy of education. The challenge arises from claims to accommodation by queer people and queer communities—claims that are based on notions of queerness and queer identity that are seriously underrepresented within contemporary liberal political and educational theory. The paper articulates a liberal view of personal autonomy that is constituted by a conception of (...)
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  29.  14
    Georgiana Shick Tryon (2000). Ethical Transgressions of School Psychology Graduate Students: A Critical Incidents Survey. Ethics and Behavior 10 (3):271 – 279.
    This study examines ethical transgressions of school psychology graduate students using the critical incidents technique. Program directors of school psychology programs listed in the Directory of School Psychology Graduate Programs (Thomas, 1998) were asked to describe ethical violations committed by their students during the past 5 years. Violations dealt primarily with issues involving confidentiality, competence, and professional and academic honesty. Directors believed that the majority of students would not find most ethical issues problematic. Implications (...)
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  30.  38
    John F. Kihlstrom (2004). Is There a “People Are Stupid” School in Social Psychology? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):348-348.
    This commentary notes the emergence of a “People are Stupid” school of thought that describes social behavior as mindless, automatic, and unconscious. I trace the roots of this “school,” particularly in the link between situationism in social psychology and behaviorism in psychology at large, and suggest that social psychology should focus on the role of the mind in social interaction.
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  31.  56
    Gill Valentine (1999). Being Seen and Heard? The Ethical Complexities of Working with Children and Young People at Home and at School. Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):141 – 155.
    In the late 1980s and early 1990s a number of key writers within sociology and anthropology criticised much of the existing research on children within the social sciences as 'adultist'. This has subsequently provoked attempts by academics to define new ways of working with , not on or for, children that have been characterised by a desire to define more mutuality between adult and children in research relationships and to identify new ways that researchers can engage with (...)
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  32.  13
    Georgiana Shick Tryon (2001). School Psychology Students' Beliefs About Their Preparation and Concern with Ethical Issues. Ethics and Behavior 11 (4):375 – 394.
    This study investigated school psychology doctoral students' beliefs concerning their preparation for, and concern about, dealing with 12 ethical issues based on year in graduate school and whether they had taken an ethics course. Two hundred thirty-three doctoral students from 18 of the 44 American Psychological Association accredited programs in school psychology listed in the December 1996 issue of the American Psychologist completed ethical issues surveys. Results showed that students who had taken an ethics course (...)
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  33.  6
    Kevin Marjoribanks (1996). Family Socialisation and Children's School Outcomes: An Investigation of a Parenting Model. Educational Studies 22 (1):3-11.
    The study investigated relationships between the dimensions of a parenting model and children's school outcomes. Also, a bioecological model was examined which proposes that proximal parenting processes have the general effect of mediating relationships between distal social contexts and children's outcomes, while advantageous individual characteristics enhance associations between proximal family processes and children's characteristics. Data were collected from 900 11 year‐old Australian children and their parents. The findings suggest that: a parenting model defined by parents’ (...)
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  34. Chih‐Lun Hung & Kevin Marjoribanks* (2005). Parents, Teachers and Children's School Outcomes: A Taiwanese Study. Educational Studies 31 (1):3-13.
    The study examined relationships among family social status, perceptions of family and school learning environments, and measures of children’s academic achievement, educational aspirations and self‐concept. Data were collected from 261 11‐year‐old Taiwanese children. The findings from structural equation modelling suggest that: family social status continues to have an unmediated association with children’s academic achievement, but its relationship to educational aspirations and self‐concept is mediated by children’s perceptions of their more immediate learning environments, and after taking (...)
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  35.  4
    Sue Lyle & Junnine Thomas-Williams (2012). Dialogic Practice in Primary Schools: How Primary Head Teachers Plan to Embed Philosophy for Children Into the Whole School. Educational Studies 38 (1):1-12.
    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project is an ongoing research project to explore the impact of philosophy for children on classroom practice. This paper reports on the responses of head teachers, teachers and local educational authority officers in South Wales, UK, to the initial training programme in Philosophy for Children carried out by the University School of Education. Achieving change in schools through the embedding of new practices is an important challenge for head teachers. Interviews (...)
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  36.  5
    Majda Schmidt & Branka Čagran (2006). Classroom Climate in Regular Primary School Settings with Children with Special Needs. Educational Studies 32 (4):361-372.
    This study investigates the classroom climate in two settings of the 6th?grade class (a setting of children with special needs and a setting without children with special needs), focusing on aspects of satisfaction and cohesiveness on one side and friction, competitiveness and difficulties on the other. The study results indicate the existence of both positive and negative consequences of the integration of hearing?impaired pupils. Heterogeneity achieved by the presence of children with special needs included positive benefits for (...)
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  37.  2
    Michael J. Boulton (1993). A Comparison of Adults’ and Children's Abilities to Distinguish Between Aggressive and Playful Fighting in Middle School Pupils: Implications for Playground Supervision and Behaviour Management. Educational Studies 19 (2):193-203.
    A sample of adults was shown an edited videotape of episodes of playful and aggressive fighting involving middle school pupils that had previously been shown to a sample of 8 and 11 year‐old children. Each participant was asked to say whether she/he thought each episode was playful or aggressive and then to give the reasons for her/his choice. The majority view of the adults’ perceptions of the episodes matched the majority view of the children. As individuals, all (...)
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  38.  4
    Robert Henley Woody (2011). Science in Mental Health Training and Practice, With Special Reference to School Psychology. Ethics and Behavior 21 (1):69-77.
    The first words in the inaugural version of the American Psychological Association Ethical Standards of Psychologists (1953) declared, ?Psychology is a science? (p. v). Professional ethics for all of the mental health disciplines support science (and objectivity) for knowledge and practice. Using school psychology as an example, consideration is given to the presence of science and research in the scientist-practitioner, professional practitioner, and psychoeducational training and practice models. Although none of the three models truly ignores a commitment (...)
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  39.  2
    Diane Reay & Helen Lucey (2000). Children, School Choice and Social Differences. Educational Studies 26 (1):83-100.
    Research into school choice has focused primarily on parental perspectives. In contrast, this study directly explores children's experiences as they are going through the secondary school choice process in two inner London primary schools. While there were important commonalities in children's experience, in this paper we have concentrated on the differences. These, we argue, lay in (a) children's material and social circumstances, (b) children's individuality, and (c) the ways in which power is played out (...)
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  40.  2
    Chih‐Lun Hung & Kevin Marjoribanks * (2005). Parents, Teachers and Children's School Outcomes: A Taiwanese Study. Educational Studies 31 (1):3-13.
    The study examined relationships among family social status, perceptions of family and school learning environments, and measures of children?s academic achievement, educational aspirations and self?concept. Data were collected from 261 (128 boys, 133 girls) 11?year?old Taiwanese children. The findings from structural equation modelling suggest that: (a) family social status continues to have an unmediated association with children?s academic achievement, but its relationship to educational aspirations and self?concept is mediated by children?s perceptions of their more immediate (...)
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  41.  1
    Alan Gordon (2001). School Exclusions in England: Children's Voices and Adult Solutions? Educational Studies 27 (1):69-85.
    This paper examines the rise in school exclusions in England in the 1990s. It discusses the definitions and different types of exclusion and how policies towards exclusion have been changing. It considers the groups of students that have been, and remain, at the greatest risk of exclusion and the main reasons given by schools for excluding students. Particular attention is focused on the views of excluded children themselves, collated from a wide range of studies, including primary research with (...)
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  42. Joy Faulkner (1990). White Children in a Multi‐Cultural School Setting: A Valid Cause for Concern? Educational Studies 16 (2):109-116.
    This research was carried out as the basis for an M.Ed. thesis for the University of Birmingham during the early part of 1983. Its main aim was to compare the social, emotional and scholastic adjustment of a group of indigenous white children attending a multi‐cultural school with a similar group being educated in a mono‐cultural, predominantly white setting. A secondary aim was to investigate inter‐ethnic differences between the three cultural groups represented. The investigation was carried out amongst pupils (...)
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  43. Ben Whitney (2004). Protecting Children: A Handbook for Teachers and School Managers. Routledge.
    Protecting children from abuse has never been more central to our welfare system than it is now. Schools, and the people who work there, are vital to the government's vision for child protection. New laws, guidance and standards all set out what educational establishments must provide in order to meet their legal obligations. This book brings all these sources together to provide detailed and practical advice to help the busy teacher or school manager. Based on years of direct (...)
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  44.  1
    H. C. M. Carroll (2013). The Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties of Primary School Children with Poor Attendance Records. Educational Studies 39 (2):223-234.
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  45. H. C. M. Carroll (2013). The Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties of Primary School Children with Poor Attendance Records. Educational Studies 39 (2):223-234.
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  46. P. J. Rogers & Felicity Aston (2010). Teaching Method, Memory and Learning: An Enquiry with Primary School Children. Educational Studies 18 (2):129-149.
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  47.  11
    Edgar Schuster (1914). The Health and Physique of School Children. The Eugenics Review 6 (3):245.
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  48.  2
    Kevin Durkin (2006). The Production of Locative Prepositions by Young School Children. Educational Studies 6 (1):9-30.
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  49.  7
    A. Cockburn (1915). The Feeding of School Children. The Eugenics Review 6 (4):319.
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  50.  16
    Olivera Petrovich (1982). Moral Development Among Mildly Mentally Handicapped School Children. Journal of Moral Education 11 (4):233-246.
    Abstract According to the cognitive?developmental theory, intellectual development is best understood in terms of age?related changes. This has been found to be a valid theory in the case of mentally subnormal subjects as well, although their development proceeds at a speed and up to a level different from their normal age?mates. The same theory has been applied to moral development and describes it, likewise, as a stage?like progress of moral reasoning with age. The present study tries to answer the following (...)
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