Search results for 'Science Psychological aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Barry Gholson (ed.) (1989). Psychology of Science: Contributions to Metascience. Cambridge University Press.score: 270.0
    This is the first comprehensive view of the work of scholars in several different disciplines contributing to the development of the psychology of science. This new field of inquiry is a systematic elaboration and application of psychological concepts and methods to clarify the nature of the scientific enterprise. While the psychology of science overlaps the philosophy, history, and sociology of science in important ways, its predominant focus is on individuals and small groups, rather than broad social (...)
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  2. A. D. Lovie (1992). Context and Commitment: A Psychology of Science. Harvester Wheatsheaf.score: 234.0
     
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  3. Peter Carruthers, Stephen P. Stich & Michael Siegal (eds.) (2002). The Cognitive Basis of Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 225.0
    The Cognitive Basis of Science concerns the question 'What makes science possible?' Specifically, what features of the human mind and of human culture and cognitive development permit and facilitate the conduct of science? The essays in this volume address these questions, which are inherently interdisciplinary, requiring co-operation between philosophers, psychologists, and others in the social and cognitive sciences. They concern the cognitive, social, and motivational underpinnings of scientific reasoning in children and lay persons as well as in (...)
     
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  4. Svend Brinkmann (2004). Psychology as a Moral Science: Aspects of John Dewey's Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 17 (1):1-28.score: 207.0
    The article presents an interpretation of certain aspects of John Dewey’s psychological works. The interpretation aims to show that Dewey’s framework speaks directly to certain problems that the discipline of psychology faces today. In particular the reflexive problem, the fact that psychology as an array of discursive practices has served to constitute forms of human subjectivity in Western cultures. Psychology has served to produce or transform its subject-matter. It is shown first that Dewey was aware of the reflexive (...)
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  5. Bruno Osimo (2002). On Psychological Aspects of Translation. Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):607-626.score: 207.0
    Translation science is going through a preliminary stage of self-definition. Jakobson’s essay “On linguistic aspects of translation”, whose title is re-echoed in the title of this article, despite the linguistic approach suggested, opened, in 1959, the study of translation to disciplines other than linguistics, semiotics to start with. Many developments in the semiotics of translation — particularly Torop’s theory of total translation — take their cue from the celebrated category “intersemiotic translation or transmutation” outlined in that 1959 article. (...)
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  6. Martin Fischer (2012). Interdisciplinary Technology Assessment of Service Robots: The Psychological/Work Science Perspective. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):231-248.score: 189.0
    The article sheds light on psychological and work science aspects of the design and utilization of service robots. An initial presentation of the characteristics of man–robot interaction is followed by a discussion of the principles of the division of functions between human beings and robots in service area work systems. The following aspects are to be considered: (1) the organisation of societal work (such as the different employment and professional profiles of service employees), (2) the work (...)
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  7. Kenneth R. Miller (2008). Only a Theory: Evolution and the Battle for America's Soul. Viking Penguin.score: 180.0
    A well-regarded scientist who offered expert testimony at the high-profile 2005 trial over the teaching of evolution in Dover, Pennsylvania, presents an ...
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  8. Martin J. Pickering & Nick Chater (1995). Why Cognitive Science is Not Formalized Folk Psychology. Minds and Machines 5 (3):309-337.score: 177.0
    It is often assumed that cognitive science is built upon folk psychology, and that challenges to folk psychology are therefore challenges to cognitive science itself. We argue that, in practice, cognitive science and folk psychology treat entirely non-overlapping domains: cognitive science considers aspects of mental life which do not depend on general knowledge, whereas folk psychology considers aspects of mental life which do depend on general knowledge. We back up our argument on theoretical grounds, (...)
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  9. Husain Sarkar (2007). Group Rationality in Scientific Research. Cambridge University Press.score: 174.0
    Group Rationality in Scientific Research.
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  10. Jim Storr (2009). The Human Face of War. Continuum.score: 174.0
    This highly original book calls for, and suggests, a new way of considering war and warfare.
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  11. Eske Bockelmann (2004). Im Takt des Geldes: Zur Genese Modernen Denkens. Zu Klampen.score: 174.0
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  12. Richard Doyle (2011). Darwin's Pharmacy: Sex, Plants, and the Evolution of the Noosphere. University of Washington Press.score: 174.0
  13. Jon Elster (1984). Ulysses and the Sirens: Studies in Rationality and Irrationality. Editions De La Maison des Sciences De L'Homme.score: 174.0
     
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  14. M. A. K. Halliday (1999/2006). Construing Experience Through Meaning: A Language-Based Approach to Cognition. Continuum.score: 174.0
  15. J. K. Trivedi, H. Sareen & M. Dhyani (2009). Psychological Aspects of Widowhood and Divorce. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):37.score: 146.0
    _Despite advances in standard of living of the population, the condition of widows and divorced women remains deplorable in society. The situation is worse in developing nations with their unique social, cultural and economic milieu, which at times ignores the basic human rights of this vulnerable section of society. A gap exists in life expectancies of men and women in both developing and developed nations. This, coupled with greater remarriage rates in men, ensures that the number of widows continues to (...)
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  16. J. F. Pearson (1973). Social and Psychological Aspects of Extra-Marital First Conceptions. Journal of Biosocial Science 5 (4):453-496.score: 135.0
    A controlled comparison study was completed using interview data from 80 women each experiencing their first pregnancy whilst single. Half of the women continued their pregnancy, in some cases marrying the father. The other half obtained an abortion. Two interviewers, one male and the other female, each completed an equal number of interviews with both groups of women.
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  17. C. P. Seager (1985). Psychological Aspects of Genetic Counselling. Edited by Alan E. H. Emery and Ian M. Pullen. Pp. 326. (Academic Press, 1984.) $32.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 17 (4):505-506.score: 135.0
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  18. J. M. Ziman (1981). Puzzles, Problems, and Enigmas: Occasional Pieces on the Human Aspects of Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 134.0
    A discussion of the human side of science, originally published in 1981.
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  19. Herbert Gintis (2007). A Framework for the Unification of the Behavioral Sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):1-16.score: 129.0
    The various behavioral disciplines model human behavior in distinct and incompatible ways. Yet, recent theoretical and empirical developments have created the conditions for rendering coherent the areas of overlap of the various behavioral disciplines. The analytical tools deployed in this task incorporate core principles from several behavioral disciplines. The proposed framework recognizes evolutionary theory, covering both genetic and cultural evolution, as the integrating principle of behavioral science. Moreover, if decision theory and game theory are broadened to encompass other-regarding preferences, (...)
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  20. Christopher Hauke (2000). Jung and the Postmodern: The Interpretation of Realities. Routledge.score: 120.0
    The psychological writing of Jung and the post-Jungians is all too often ignored as anachronistic, archaic and mystic. In Jung and the Postmodern, Christopher Hauke challenges this, arguing that Jungian psychology is more relevant now than ever before - not only can it be a response to modernity, but it can offer a critique of modernity and Enlightenment values which brings it in line with the postmodern critique of contemporary culture. After introducing Jungians to postmodern themes in Jameson, Baudrillard, (...)
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  21. Arne Naess (1966). Psychological and Social Aspects of Pyrrhonian Scepticism. Inquiry 9 (1-4):301 – 321.score: 117.0
    A brief account is given of Pyrrhonian scepticism, as portrayed by Sextus Empiricus. This scepticism differs significantly from the views commonly attributed to 'the sceptic' which take scepticism to be a view or philosophical position to the effect that there can be no knowledge. The Pyrrhonist makes no philosophical assertions, because he does not find the arguments in favor of any position to be decisively stronger than the arguments against. Objections to scepticism, for instance that the sceptic cannot consistently show (...)
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  22. François Penz, Gregory Radick & Robert Howell (eds.) (2004). Space: In Science, Art, and Society. Cambridge University Press.score: 114.0
    This collection of essays explores different perceptions of space, taking the reader on a journey from the inner space of the mind to the vacuum beyond Earth. Eight leading researchers span a broad range of fields, from the arts and humanities to the natural sciences. They consider topics ranging from human consciousness to virtual reality, architecture and politics. The essays are written in an accessible style for a general audience.
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  23. Joseph Henrich, Steven J. Heine & Ara Norenzayan (2010). Beyond WEIRD: Towards a Broad-Based Behavioral Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):111-135.score: 111.0
    In our response to the 28 (largely positive) commentaries from an esteemed collection of researchers, we (1) consolidate additional evidence, extensions, and amplifications offered by our commentators; (2) emphasize the value of integrating experimental and ethnographic methods, and show how researchers using behavioral games have done precisely this; (3) present our concerns with arguments from several commentators that separate variable from or ; (4) address concerns that the patterns we highlight marking WEIRD people as psychological outliers arise from (...) of the researchers and the research process; (5) respond to the claim that as members of the same species, humans must have the same invariant psychological processes; (6) address criticisms of our telescoping contrasts; and (7) return to the question of explaining why WEIRD people are psychologically unusual. We believe a broad-based behavioral science of human nature needs to integrate a variety of methods and apply them to diverse populations, well beyond the WEIRD samples it has largely relied upon. (shrink)
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  24. Jonathan D. Cohen & Mohan Matthen (eds.) (2010). Color Ontology and Color Science. Mit Press.score: 111.0
  25. John McCrone (1994). The Myth of Irrationality: The Science of the Mind From Plato to Star Trek. Carroll & Graf Publishers.score: 111.0
     
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  26. Sue Wilkinson & Celia Kitzinger (eds.) (1996). Representing the Other: A Feminism & Psychology Reader. Sage Publications.score: 111.0
    Identifying a range of key concerns related to representation and difference, Representing the Other offers a provocative agenda for the future development of feminist theory and practice. The book's contributors, including many key international researchers in women's studies, draw on personal experiences of speaking "for" and "about" others in their research, professional practice, academic writing, or political activism. They highlight problems of representing the Other with an ethnic or cultural background different from one's own and extend discussions of "Othering" to (...)
     
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  27. Carissa Véliz, The 3rd World Conference on Buddhism and Science (WCBS).score: 108.0
    The term mindfulness has become increasingly popular in the West due, in no small part, to contemporary studies of mindfulness-based therapies in psychology. According to the Pali Nik?yas, mindfulness practice is the heart of Buddhism, for it alone can lead one to enlightenment. However, are contemporary and traditional accounts of the practice of mindfulness referring to the same technique? In this paper I will argue that modern accounts of mindfulness in the field of psychology omit important features of the classical (...)
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  28. Dan Haybron, Philosophy and the Science of Subjective Well-Being.score: 108.0
    The Renaissance of Prudential Psychology Philosophical reflection on the good life in coming decades will likely owe a tremendous debt to the burgeoning science of subjective well-being and the pioneers, like Ed Diener, who brought it to fruition. While the psychological dimensions of human welfare now occupy a prominent position in the social sciences, they have gotten surprisingly little attention in the recent philosophical literature. The situation appears to be changing, however, as philosophers inspired by the empirical research (...)
     
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  29. Robert N. Mccauley (1986). Problem Solving in Science and the Competence Approach to Theorizing in Linguistics. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 16 (3):299–312.score: 108.0
    The goals ofthis paper are to identify (in Section II) some general features of problem solving strategies in science, to discuss (in Section III) how Chomsky has employed two particularly popular discovery strategies in science, and to show (in Section IV) how these strategies inform Chomskyan linguistics. In Section IV I will discuss (1) how their employment in linguistics manifests features of scientific problem solving outlined in Section Il and (2) how an analysis in terms of those features (...)
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  30. Helmut F. Spinner (1973). Science Without Reduction. Inquiry 16 (1-4):16 – 94.score: 108.0
    The aim of this essay is a criticism of reductionism ? both in its ?static? interpretation (usually referred to as the layer model or level?picture of science) and in its ?dynamic? interpretation (as a theory of the growth of scientific knowledge), with emphasis on the latter ? from the point of view of Popperian fallibilism and Feyerabendian pluralism, but without being committed to the idiosyncrasies of these standpoints. In both aspects of criticism, the rejection is based on the (...)
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  31. Carroll E. Izard (2010). The Many Meanings/Aspects of Emotion: Definitions, Functions, Activation, and Regulation. Emotion Review 2 (4):363-370.score: 108.0
    Many psychological scientists and behavioral neuroscientists affirm that “emotion” influences thinking, decision-making, actions, social relationships, well-being, and physical and mental health. Yet there is no consensus on a definition of the word “emotion,” and the present data suggest that it cannot be defined as a unitary concept. Theorists and researchers attribute quite different yet heuristic meanings to “emotion.” They show considerable agreement about emotion activation, functions, and regulation. The central goal of this article is to alert researchers, students, and (...)
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  32. C. E. M. Joad (1932/1972). Philosophical Aspects of Modern Science. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 108.0
    PHILOSOPHICAL ASPECTS OF MODERN SCIENCE By the same Author ESSAYS IN COMMON-SENSE PHILOSOPHY Second Impression Published by the Oxford University Press MATTER, ...
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  33. Verusca Moss Simões dos Reis & Antonio Augusto Passos Videira (2013). John Ziman and Post-Academic Science: Consensibility, Consensus, and Reliability. Scientiae Studia 11 (3):583-611.score: 108.0
    Este artigo tem como objetivo discutir algumas das teses centrais do físico teórico e epistemólogo John Michael Ziman relativas à dimensão social da ciência. Ziman sustenta que, para um melhor entendimento das mudanças ocorridas na prática científica contemporânea, sobretudo das consequências geradas nas últimas décadas pelo que ele denominou de "ciência pós-acadêmica", é necessária uma abordagem que inclua aspectos não somente filosóficos, mas também sociológicos e históricos. Segundo Ziman, a supervalorização, na ciência pós-acadêmica, de valores ligados a uma cultura gerencial (...)
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  34. G. Fletcher (1995). Two Uses of Folk Psychology: Implications for Psychological Science. Philosophical Psychology 8 (3):375-88.score: 104.0
    This article describes two uses of folk psychology in scientific psychology. Use 1 deals with the way in which folk theories and beliefs are imported into social psychological models on the basis that they exert causal influences on cognition or behavior (regardless of their validity or scientific usefulness). Use 2 describes the practice of mining elements from folk psychology for building an overarching psychological theory that goes beyond common sense (and assumes such elements are valid or scientifically useful). (...)
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  35. Jon Elster (2000). Ulysses Unbound: Studies in Rationality, Precommitment, and Constraints. Cambridge University Press.score: 104.0
    Common sense suggests that it is always preferable to have more options than fewer, and better to have more knowledge than less. This provocative book argues that, very often, common sense fails. Sometimes it is simply the case that less is more; people may benefit from being constrained in their options or from being ignorant. The three long essays that constitute this book revise and expand the ideas developed in Jon Elster's classic study Ulysses and the Sirens. It is not (...)
     
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  36. E. Rae Harcum (1994). A Psychology of Freedom and Dignity: The Last Train to Survival. Praeger.score: 102.0
    Harcum sounds an alarm against society continuing to look to rigorous conceptions of science as the way to solutions for our social problems, and advocates the ...
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  37. Kostas Kampourakis & William McComas (2010). Charles Darwin and Evolution: Illustrating Human Aspects of Science. [REVIEW] Science and Education 19 (6-8):637-654.score: 102.0
    Recently, the nature of science (NOS) has become recognized as an important element within the K-12 science curriculum. Despite differences in the ultimate lists of recommended aspects, a consensus is emerging on what specific NOS elements should be the focus of science instruction and inform textbook writers and curriculum developers. In this article, we suggest a contextualized, explicit approach addressing one core NOS aspect: the human aspects of science that include the domains of creativity, (...)
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  38. Alvin I. Goldman (1994). Psychological, Social, and Epistemic Factors in the Theory of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:277 - 286.score: 102.0
    This article blends psychological and social factors in the explanation of science, and defends the compatibility of a psychosocial picture with an epistemic picture. It examines three variants of the 'political' approach to interpersonal persuasion advocated by Latour and others. In each case an 'epistemic' or mixed account is more promising and empirically better supported. Psychological research on motivated reasoning shows the epistemic limits of interest-driven belief. Against social constructivism, the paper defends the viability of a truth-based (...)
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  39. Peter D. Ashworth & Man Cheung Chung (eds.) (2006). Phenomenology and Psychological Science: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives. Springer.score: 100.0
    Phenomenological studies of human experience are a vital component of caring professions such as counseling and nursing, and qualitative research has had increasing acceptance in American psychology. At the same time, the debate continues over whether phenomenology is legitimate science, and whether qualitative approaches carry any empirical validity. Ashworth and Chung’s Phenomenology and Psychological Science places phenomenology firmly in the context of psychological tradition. And to dispel the basic misconceptions surrounding this field, the editors and their (...)
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  40. Simeon Locke (2008). Consciousness, Self-Consciousness, and the Science of Being Human. Praeger.score: 99.0
    In the beginning: introduction -- This I believe: preview -- This they believe: other views -- Where it begins: anatomy and environment -- Where it began: evolution -- What is it?: consciousness -- There was the word: self-consciousness and language -- See here: attention -- Perhaps to dream: sleep -- x=2y: representation -- The dance of life: movement -- They all fall down: dissolution of function -- Been there, done that: experience -- Which have eyes and see not: stimulus hierarchy (...)
     
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  41. Jordi Cat (2007). Switching Gestalts on Gestalt Psychology: On the Relation Between Science and Philosophy. Perspectives on Science 15 (2):131-177.score: 98.0
    : The distinction between science and philosophy plays a central role in methodological, programmatic and institutional debates. Discussions of disciplinary identities typically focus on boundaries or else on genealogies, yielding models of demarcation and models of dynamics. Considerations of a discipline's self-image, often based on history, often plays an important role in the values, projects and practices of its members. Recent focus on the dynamics of scientific change supplements Kuhnian neat model with a role for philosophy and yields a (...)
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  42. Martin Bridgstock (ed.) (1998). Science, Technology, and Society: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 98.0
    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the human, social and economic aspects of science and technology. It examines a broad range of issues from a variety of perspectives, using examples and experiences from Australia and around the world. The authors present complex issues in an accessible and engaging form. Topics include the responsibilities of scientists, ethical dilemmas and controversies, the Industrial Revolution, economic issues, public policy, and science and technology in developing countries. The book ends with (...)
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  43. David Bell (2006). Science, Technology and Culture. Open University Press.score: 98.0
    Equipping readers with an understanding of science and technology as aspects of culture, the book encourages them to think about the roles and effects of ...
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  44. Ralph Levinson & Jeff Thomas (eds.) (1997). Science Today: Problem or Crisis? Routledge.score: 98.0
    What is science? What is the purpose of science education? Should we be training scientists, or looking towards a greater public understanding of science? In this exciting text, some of the key figures in the fields of science and science education address this debate. Their contributions form an original dialogue on science education and the general public awareness of science, tackling both formal and informal aspects of science learning. the editors argue (...)
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  45. James R. Wible (1998). The Economics of Science: Methodology and Epistemology as If Economics Really Mattered. Routledge.score: 98.0
    This book explores aspects of science from an economic point of view. The author begins with economic models of misconduct in science, moving on to discuss other important issues, including market failure and the market place of ideas.
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  46. Paul Schweizer (2001). Realization, Reduction and Psychological Autonomy. Synthese 126 (3):383-405.score: 96.0
    It is often thought that the computational paradigm provides a supporting case for the theoretical autonomy of the science of mind. However, I argue that computation is in fact incompatible with this alleged aspect of intentional explanation, and hence the foundational assumptions of orthodox cognitive science are mutually unstable. The most plausible way to relieve these foundational tensions is to relinquish the idea that the psychological level enjoys some special form of theoretical sovereignty. So, in contrast to (...)
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  47. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 96.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  48. Maurice A. Finocchiaro (1985). Aspects of the Logic of History-of-Science Explanation. Synthese 62 (3):429 - 454.score: 96.0
    The topic of history-of-science explanation is first briefly introduced as a generally important one for the light it may shed on action theory, on the logic of discovery, and on philosophy''s relations with historiography of science, intellectual history, and the sociology of knowledge. Then some problems and some conclusions are formulated by reference to some recent relevant literature: a critical analysis of Laudan''s views on the role of normative evaluations in rational explanations occasions the result that one must (...)
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  49. R. M. Kaplan (2009). Health Psychology: Where Are We And Where Do We Go From Here? Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):3.score: 96.0
    _Human behaviour plays a significant role in most of the leading causes of death. Psychological science has the potential to enhance health outcomes through a better understanding of health promoting and health damaging behaviours. Health psychology and the related field of behavioural medicine focus on the interplay among biological dispositions, behaviour, and social context. The field might advance by building better collaboration with other fields of medicine, sharing expertise on technical aspects of psychometric outcomes assessment, identifying behavioural (...)
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  50. George Sidney Brett (1912/1998). A History of Psychology. Thoemmes Press.score: 96.0
    'the whole work is remarkably fresh, vivid and attractively written psychologists will be grateful that a work of this kind has been done ... by one who has the scholarship, science, and philosophical training that are requisite for the task' - Mind This renowned three-volume collection records chronologically the steps by which psychology developed from the time of the early Greek thinkers and the first writings on the nature of the mind, through to the 1920s and such modern preoccupations (...)
     
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