Search results for 'Science Psychological aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Barry Gholson (ed.) (1989). Psychology of Science: Contributions to Metascience. Cambridge University Press.score: 90.0
    This is the first comprehensive view of the work of scholars in several different disciplines contributing to the development of the psychology of science. This new field of inquiry is a systematic elaboration and application of psychological concepts and methods to clarify the nature of the scientific enterprise. While the psychology of science overlaps the philosophy, history, and sociology of science in important ways, its predominant focus is on individuals and small groups, rather than broad social (...)
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  2. A. D. Lovie (1992). Context and Commitment: A Psychology of Science. Harvester Wheatsheaf.score: 78.0
     
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  3. Peter Carruthers, Stephen P. Stich & Michael Siegal (eds.) (2002). The Cognitive Basis of Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 75.0
    The Cognitive Basis of Science concerns the question 'What makes science possible?' Specifically, what features of the human mind and of human culture and cognitive development permit and facilitate the conduct of science? The essays in this volume address these questions, which are inherently interdisciplinary, requiring co-operation between philosophers, psychologists, and others in the social and cognitive sciences. They concern the cognitive, social, and motivational underpinnings of scientific reasoning in children and lay persons as well as in (...)
     
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  4. J. K. Trivedi, H. Sareen & M. Dhyani (2009). Psychological Aspects of Widowhood and Divorce. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):37.score: 73.0
    _Despite advances in standard of living of the population, the condition of widows and divorced women remains deplorable in society. The situation is worse in developing nations with their unique social, cultural and economic milieu, which at times ignores the basic human rights of this vulnerable section of society. A gap exists in life expectancies of men and women in both developing and developed nations. This, coupled with greater remarriage rates in men, ensures that the number of widows continues to (...)
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  5. Svend Brinkmann (2004). Psychology as a Moral Science: Aspects of John Dewey's Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 17 (1):1-28.score: 69.0
    The article presents an interpretation of certain aspects of John Dewey’s psychological works. The interpretation aims to show that Dewey’s framework speaks directly to certain problems that the discipline of psychology faces today. In particular the reflexive problem, the fact that psychology as an array of discursive practices has served to constitute forms of human subjectivity in Western cultures. Psychology has served to produce or transform its subject-matter. It is shown first that Dewey was aware of the reflexive (...)
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  6. Bruno Osimo (2002). On Psychological Aspects of Translation. Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):607-626.score: 69.0
    Translation science is going through a preliminary stage of self-definition. Jakobson’s essay “On linguistic aspects of translation”, whose title is re-echoed in the title of this article, despite the linguistic approach suggested, opened, in 1959, the study of translation to disciplines other than linguistics, semiotics to start with. Many developments in the semiotics of translation — particularly Torop’s theory of total translation — take their cue from the celebrated category “intersemiotic translation or transmutation” outlined in that 1959 article. (...)
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  7. J. M. Ziman (1981). Puzzles, Problems, and Enigmas: Occasional Pieces on the Human Aspects of Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 67.0
    A discussion of the human side of science, originally published in 1981.
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  8. Martin Fischer (2012). Interdisciplinary Technology Assessment of Service Robots: The Psychological/Work Science Perspective. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):231-248.score: 63.0
    The article sheds light on psychological and work science aspects of the design and utilization of service robots. An initial presentation of the characteristics of man–robot interaction is followed by a discussion of the principles of the division of functions between human beings and robots in service area work systems. The following aspects are to be considered: (1) the organisation of societal work (such as the different employment and professional profiles of service employees), (2) the work (...)
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  9. Kenneth R. Miller (2008). Only a Theory: Evolution and the Battle for America's Soul. Viking Penguin.score: 60.0
    A well-regarded scientist who offered expert testimony at the high-profile 2005 trial over the teaching of evolution in Dover, Pennsylvania, presents an ...
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  10. Martin J. Pickering & Nick Chater (1995). Why Cognitive Science is Not Formalized Folk Psychology. Minds and Machines 5 (3):309-337.score: 59.0
    It is often assumed that cognitive science is built upon folk psychology, and that challenges to folk psychology are therefore challenges to cognitive science itself. We argue that, in practice, cognitive science and folk psychology treat entirely non-overlapping domains: cognitive science considers aspects of mental life which do not depend on general knowledge, whereas folk psychology considers aspects of mental life which do depend on general knowledge. We back up our argument on theoretical grounds, (...)
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  11. Husain Sarkar (2007). Group Rationality in Scientific Research. Cambridge University Press.score: 58.0
    Group Rationality in Scientific Research.
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  12. Jim Storr (2009). The Human Face of War. Continuum.score: 58.0
    This highly original book calls for, and suggests, a new way of considering war and warfare.
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  13. Eske Bockelmann (2004). Im Takt des Geldes: Zur Genese Modernen Denkens. Zu Klampen.score: 58.0
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  14. Richard Doyle (2011). Darwin's Pharmacy: Sex, Plants, and the Evolution of the Noosphere. University of Washington Press.score: 58.0
  15. Jon Elster (1984). Ulysses and the Sirens: Studies in Rationality and Irrationality. Editions De La Maison des Sciences De L'Homme.score: 58.0
     
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  16. M. A. K. Halliday (1999/2006). Construing Experience Through Meaning: A Language-Based Approach to Cognition. Continuum.score: 58.0
  17. C. E. M. Joad (1932/1972). Philosophical Aspects of Modern Science. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 54.0
    PHILOSOPHICAL ASPECTS OF MODERN SCIENCE By the same Author ESSAYS IN COMMON-SENSE PHILOSOPHY Second Impression Published by the Oxford University Press MATTER, ...
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  18. G. Fletcher (1995). Two Uses of Folk Psychology: Implications for Psychological Science. Philosophical Psychology 8 (3):375-88.score: 52.0
    This article describes two uses of folk psychology in scientific psychology. Use 1 deals with the way in which folk theories and beliefs are imported into social psychological models on the basis that they exert causal influences on cognition or behavior (regardless of their validity or scientific usefulness). Use 2 describes the practice of mining elements from folk psychology for building an overarching psychological theory that goes beyond common sense (and assumes such elements are valid or scientifically useful). (...)
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  19. Kostas Kampourakis & William McComas (2010). Charles Darwin and Evolution: Illustrating Human Aspects of Science. [REVIEW] Science and Education 19 (6-8):637-654.score: 51.0
    Recently, the nature of science (NOS) has become recognized as an important element within the K-12 science curriculum. Despite differences in the ultimate lists of recommended aspects, a consensus is emerging on what specific NOS elements should be the focus of science instruction and inform textbook writers and curriculum developers. In this article, we suggest a contextualized, explicit approach addressing one core NOS aspect: the human aspects of science that include the domains of creativity, (...)
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  20. Alvin I. Goldman (1994). Psychological, Social, and Epistemic Factors in the Theory of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:277 - 286.score: 51.0
    This article blends psychological and social factors in the explanation of science, and defends the compatibility of a psychosocial picture with an epistemic picture. It examines three variants of the 'political' approach to interpersonal persuasion advocated by Latour and others. In each case an 'epistemic' or mixed account is more promising and empirically better supported. Psychological research on motivated reasoning shows the epistemic limits of interest-driven belief. Against social constructivism, the paper defends the viability of a truth-based (...)
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  21. Peter D. Ashworth & Man Cheung Chung (eds.) (2006). Phenomenology and Psychological Science: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives. Springer.score: 50.0
    Phenomenological studies of human experience are a vital component of caring professions such as counseling and nursing, and qualitative research has had increasing acceptance in American psychology. At the same time, the debate continues over whether phenomenology is legitimate science, and whether qualitative approaches carry any empirical validity. Ashworth and Chung’s Phenomenology and Psychological Science places phenomenology firmly in the context of psychological tradition. And to dispel the basic misconceptions surrounding this field, the editors and their (...)
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  22. Martin Bridgstock (ed.) (1998). Science, Technology, and Society: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 49.0
    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the human, social and economic aspects of science and technology. It examines a broad range of issues from a variety of perspectives, using examples and experiences from Australia and around the world. The authors present complex issues in an accessible and engaging form. Topics include the responsibilities of scientists, ethical dilemmas and controversies, the Industrial Revolution, economic issues, public policy, and science and technology in developing countries. The book ends with (...)
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  23. David Bell (2006). Science, Technology and Culture. Open University Press.score: 49.0
    Equipping readers with an understanding of science and technology as aspects of culture, the book encourages them to think about the roles and effects of ...
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  24. Ralph Levinson & Jeff Thomas (eds.) (1997). Science Today: Problem or Crisis? Routledge.score: 49.0
    What is science? What is the purpose of science education? Should we be training scientists, or looking towards a greater public understanding of science? In this exciting text, some of the key figures in the fields of science and science education address this debate. Their contributions form an original dialogue on science education and the general public awareness of science, tackling both formal and informal aspects of science learning. the editors argue (...)
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  25. James R. Wible (1998). The Economics of Science: Methodology and Epistemology as If Economics Really Mattered. Routledge.score: 49.0
    This book explores aspects of science from an economic point of view. The author begins with economic models of misconduct in science, moving on to discuss other important issues, including market failure and the market place of ideas.
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  26. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 48.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  27. Maurice A. Finocchiaro (1985). Aspects of the Logic of History-of-Science Explanation. Synthese 62 (3):429 - 454.score: 48.0
    The topic of history-of-science explanation is first briefly introduced as a generally important one for the light it may shed on action theory, on the logic of discovery, and on philosophy''s relations with historiography of science, intellectual history, and the sociology of knowledge. Then some problems and some conclusions are formulated by reference to some recent relevant literature: a critical analysis of Laudan''s views on the role of normative evaluations in rational explanations occasions the result that one must (...)
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  28. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 48.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  29. Austin L. Porterfield (1941). Creative Factors in Scientific Research; a Social Psychology of Scientific Knowledge, Studying the Interplay of Psychological and Cultural Factors in Science with Emphasis Upon Imagination. Durham, N.C.,Duke University Press.score: 48.0
     
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  30. Robert D. Romanyshyn (1982). Psychological Life: From Science to Metaphor. University of Texas Press.score: 48.0
  31. Andreas Hüttemann & Alan C. Love (2011). Aspects of Reductive Explanation in Biological Science: Intrinsicality, Fundamentality, and Temporality. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (3):519-549.score: 45.0
    The inapplicability of variations on theory reduction in the context of genetics and their irrelevance to ongoing research has led to an anti-reductionist consensus in philosophy of biology. One response to this situation is to focus on forms of reductive explanation that better correspond to actual scientific reasoning (e.g. part–whole relations). Working from this perspective, we explore three different aspects (intrinsicality, fundamentality, and temporality) that arise from distinct facets of reductive explanation: composition and causation. Concentrating on these aspects (...)
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  32. C. D. Meyers & Sara Waller (2009). Psychological Investigations: The Private Language Argument and Inferences in Contemporary Cognitive Science. Synthese 171 (1):135-156.score: 45.0
    Some of the methods for data collection in experimental psychology, as well as many of the inferences from observed behavior or image scanning, are based on the implicit premise that language use can be linked, via the meaning of words, to specific subjective states. Wittgenstein’s well known private language argument (PLA), however, calls into question the legitimacy of such inferences. According to a strong interpretation of PLA, all of the elements of a language must be publicly available. Thus the meaning (...)
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  33. Terry Dowdall (1996). Psychological Aspects of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. In H. Russel Botman & Robin M. Petersen (eds.), To Remember and to Heal: Theological and Psychological Reflections on Truth and Reconciliation. Thorold's Africana Books [Distributor]. 27--36.score: 45.0
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  34. J. F. Pearson (1973). Social and Psychological Aspects of Extra-Marital First Conceptions. Journal of Biosocial Science 5 (4):453-496.score: 45.0
    A controlled comparison study was completed using interview data from 80 women each experiencing their first pregnancy whilst single. Half of the women continued their pregnancy, in some cases marrying the father. The other half obtained an abortion. Two interviewers, one male and the other female, each completed an equal number of interviews with both groups of women.
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  35. C. P. Seager (1985). Psychological Aspects of Genetic Counselling. Edited by Alan E. H. Emery and Ian M. Pullen. Pp. 326. (Academic Press, 1984.) $32.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 17 (4):505-506.score: 45.0
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  36. Aruna Haldar (1981). Some Psychological Aspects of Early Buddhist Philosophy Based on Abhidharmakośa of Vasubandhu. Asiatic Society.score: 44.0
     
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  37. Herbert Gintis (2007). A Framework for the Unification of the Behavioral Sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):1-16.score: 43.0
    The various behavioral disciplines model human behavior in distinct and incompatible ways. Yet, recent theoretical and empirical developments have created the conditions for rendering coherent the areas of overlap of the various behavioral disciplines. The analytical tools deployed in this task incorporate core principles from several behavioral disciplines. The proposed framework recognizes evolutionary theory, covering both genetic and cultural evolution, as the integrating principle of behavioral science. Moreover, if decision theory and game theory are broadened to encompass other-regarding preferences, (...)
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  38. Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (eds.) (2001). Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.score: 43.0
    Time and Memory throws new light on fundamental aspects of human cognition and consciousness by bringing together, for the first time, psychological and philosophical approaches dealing with the connection between the capacity to represent and think about time, and the capacity to recollect the past. Fifteen specially written essays offer insights into current theories of memory processes and of the mechanisms and cognitive abilities underlying temporal judgements, and draw out key issues concerning the phenomenology and epistemology of memory (...)
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  39. Andrew Pickering (ed.) (1992). Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press.score: 43.0
    Science as Practice and Culture explores one of the newest and most controversial developments within the rapidly changing field of science studies: the move toward studying scientific practice--the work of doing science--and the associated move toward studying scientific culture, understood as the field of resources that practice operates in and on. Andrew Pickering has invited leading historians, philosophers, sociologists, and anthropologists of science to prepare original essays for this volume. The essays range over the physical and (...)
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  40. Peter Galison & David J. Stump (eds.) (1996). The Disunity of Science: Boundaries, Contexts, and Power. Stanford University Press.score: 43.0
    Is science unified or disunified? This collection brings together contributions from prominent scholars in a variety of scientific disciplines to examine this important theoretical question. They examine whether the sciences are, or ever were, unified by a single theoretical view of nature or a methodological foundation and the implications this has for the relationship between scientific disciplines and between science and society.
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  41. Marc Applebaum (2012). Phenomenological Psychological Research as Science. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 43 (1):36-72.score: 43.0
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  42. Brian R. Vandenberg (2010). Evidence, Ontology, and Psychological Science: The Lesson of Hypnosis. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 30 (1):51-65.score: 43.0
  43. Stephen Cole (1992). Making Science: Between Nature and Society. Harvard University Press.score: 43.0
    In Making Science, Cole shows how social variables and cognitive variables interact in the evaluation of frontier knowledge.
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  44. Hans Christoph Micko (2004). On the Impossibility of Empirical Controls of Scientific Theories – From the Point of View of a Psychologist. Foundations of Science 9 (4):405-413.score: 43.0
    . Standard considerations of philosophy of science are reformulated in psychological terms and arguments, suggesting a fundamental change in life perspective: subjective experiences or introspective data are subject to motivational biases and therefore not admitted as objective empirical facts in science, However, we never experience objects or events of the external world, i.e., so called objective facts, but exclusively subjective percepts or mental events. They are merely assumed to, but may or may not be accurate or distorted (...)
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  45. R. I. M. Dunbar (1996). The Trouble with Science. Harvard University Press.score: 43.0
    Science is not a great way to make money, or these days, even a job. But there are great riches in it, and in this book too. Tim Bradford, 'New Scientist'.
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  46. Stefan G. Hofmann (1999). Introducing the Grandmother Test Into Psychological Science. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):167-176.score: 43.0
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  47. Evelyn Fox Keller & Helen E. Longino (eds.) (1996). Feminism and Science. Oxford University Press.score: 43.0
    (Series copy) The new Oxford Readings in Feminism series maps the dramatic influence of feminist theory on every branch of academic knowledge. Offering feminist perspectives on disciplines from history to science, each book assembles the most important articles written on its field in the last ten to fifteen years. Old stereotypes are challenged and traditional attitudes upset in these lively-- and sometimes controversial--volumes, all of which are edited by feminists prominent in their particular field. Comprehensive, accessible, and intellectually daring, (...)
     
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  48. Vassilis Saroglou (2003). Trans-Cultural/Religious Constants Vs. Cross-Cultural/ Religious Differences in Psychological Aspects of Religion. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 25 (1):71-87.score: 43.0
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  49. Gili S. Drori (ed.) (2003). Science in the Modern World Polity: Institutionalization and Globalization. Stanford University Press.score: 43.0
    This book presents empirical studies of the rise, expansion, and influence of scientific discourse and organization throughout the world, over the past century. Using quantitative cross-national data, it shows the impact of this scientized world polity on national societies. It examines how this world scientific system and national reflections of it have influenced a wide variety of institutional spheres—the economy, political systems, human rights, environmentalism, and organizational reforms. The authors argue that the triumph of science across social domains and (...)
     
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  50. Edgar Zilsel (2000). The Social Origins of Modern Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 43.0
    The most outstanding feature of this book is that here, for the first time, is made available in a single volume all the important historical essays Edgar Zilsel (1891-1944) published during WWII on the emergence of modern science. This edition also contains one previously unpublished essay and an extended version of an essay published earlier. In these essays, Zilsel developed the now famous thesis, named after him, that science came into being when, in the late Middle Ages, the (...)
     
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