Search results for 'Science Research' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. National Committee for Research Ethics in Science & Technology (2009). Guidelines for Research Ethics in Science and Technology. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).score: 1440.0
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  2. Alan Soble (1978). Deception in Social Science Research: Is Informed Consent Possible? Hastings Center Report 8 (5):40-46.score: 212.0
    Deception of subjects is used frequently in the social sciences. Examples are provided. The ethics of experimental deception are discussed, in particular various maneuvers to solve the problem. The results have implications for the use of deception in the biomedical sciences.
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  3. Katinka de Wet (2010). The Importance of Ethical Appraisal in Social Science Research: Reviewing a Faculty of Humanities' Research Ethics Committee. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):301-314.score: 210.0
    Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are rapidly becoming indispensable mechanisms in the overall workings of university institutions. In fact, the ethical dimension is an important aspect of research governance processes present in institutions of higher learning. However, it is often deemed that research in the social sciences do not require ethical appraisal or clearance, because of the alleged absence of harm in conducting such research. This is an erroneous and dangerous assumption given (...)
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  4. John T. Sanders & Wade L. Robison (1992). Research Funding and the Value-Dependence of Science. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 11 (1):33-50.score: 204.0
    An understanding of the ethical problems that have arisen in the funding of scientific research at universities requires some attention to doctrines that have traditionally been held about science itself. Such doctrines, we hope to show, are themselves central to many of these ethical problems. It is often thought that the questions examined by scientists, and the theories that guide scientific research, are chosen for uniquely scientific reasons, independently of extra-scientific questions of value or merit. We shall (...)
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  5. Pierre Cossette (2004). Research Integrity: An Exploratory Survey of Administrative Science Faculties. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 49 (3):213-234.score: 204.0
    This research focuses on the perceptions of research integrity held by administrative science faculty members in French-language universities in Québec. More specifically, the survey was conducted to isolate and analyse the opinions of the target group concerning the seriousness and frequency of various types of conduct generally associated with a lack of integrity among researchers, peer reviewers and editors (or other assessment supervisors), the causes attributed to research misconduct, and the solutions proposed. Its main interest is (...)
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  6. Mark B. Brown & David H. Guston (2009). Science, Democracy, and the Right to Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):351-366.score: 198.0
    Debates over the politicization of science have led some to claim that scientists have or should have a “right to research.” This article examines the political meaning and implications of the right to research with respect to different historical conceptions of rights. The more common “liberal” view sees rights as protections against social and political interference. The “republican” view, in contrast, conceives rights as claims to civic membership. Building on the republican view of rights, this article conceives (...)
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  7. Frederick Grinnell (2013). Research Integrity and Everyday Practice of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):685-701.score: 198.0
    Science traditionally is taught as a linear process based on logic and carried out by objective researchers following the scientific method. Practice of science is a far more nuanced enterprise, one in which intuition and passion become just as important as objectivity and logic. Whether the activity is committing to study a particular research problem, drawing conclusions about a hypothesis under investigation, choosing whether to count results as data or experimental noise, or deciding what information to present (...)
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  8. Shannon Oltmann (forthcoming). Dual Use Research: Investigation Across Multiple Science Disciplines. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-15.score: 198.0
    Most recent studies of dual use research have focused on the life sciences, although some researchers have suggested that dual use research occurs across many disciplines. This research is an initial investigation into the prevalence of dual use research in other scientific disciplines by surveying senior editors of scientific journals, drawn from Journal Citation Reports. The survey was emailed to 7,500 journal editors with a response rate of 10.1 %. Approximately 4.8 % of life science (...)
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  9. Dan McArthur (2009). Good Ethics Can Sometimes Mean Better Science: Research Ethics and the Milgram Experiments. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):69-79.score: 192.0
    All agree that if the Milgram experiments were proposed today they would never receive approval from a research ethics board. However, the results of the Milgram experiments are widely cited across a broad range of academic literature from psychology to moral philosophy. While interpretations of the experiments vary, few commentators, especially philosophers, have expressed doubts about the basic soundness of the results. What I argue in this paper is that this general approach to the experiments might be in error. (...)
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  10. Hugo Fjelsted Alrøe & Erik Steen Kristensen (2002). Towards a Systemic Research Methodology in Agriculture: Rethinking the Role of Values in Science. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 19 (1):3-23.score: 192.0
    The recent drastic developmentof agriculture, together with the growingsocietal interest in agricultural practices andtheir consequences, pose a challenge toagricultural science. There is a need forrethinking the general methodology ofagricultural research. This paper takes somesteps towards developing a systemic researchmethodology that can meet this challenge – ageneral self-reflexive methodology that forms abasis for doing holistic or (with a betterterm) wholeness-oriented research and providesappropriate criteria of scientific quality.From a philosophy of research perspective,science is seen as an interactive (...)
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  11. Michael Gibbons (ed.) (1994). The New Production of Knowledge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Sage Publications.score: 192.0
    As we approach the end of the twentieth century, the ways in which knowledge--scientific, social, and cultural--is produced are undergoing fundamental changes. In The New Production of Knowledge, a distinguished group of authors analyze these changes as marking the transition from established institutions, disciplines, practices, and policies to a new mode of knowledge production. Identifying such elements as reflexivity, transdisciplinarity, and heterogeneity within this new mode, the authors consider their impact and interplay with the role of knowledge in social relations. (...)
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  12. Mathieu Albert, Suzanne Laberge & Brian Hodges (2009). Boundary-Work in the Health Research Field: Biomedical and Clinician Scientists' Perceptions of Social Science Research. [REVIEW] Minerva 47 (2):171-194.score: 192.0
    Funding agencies in Canada are attempting to break down the organizational boundaries between disciplines to promote interdisciplinary research and foster the integration of the social sciences into the health research field. This paper explores the extent to which biomedical and clinician scientists’ perceptions of social science research operate as a cultural boundary to the inclusion of social scientists into this field. Results indicated that cultural boundaries may impede social scientists’ entry into the health research field (...)
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  13. Mike Walsh, Gordon Grant & Zoë Coleman (2008). Action Research—a Necessary Complement to Traditional Health Science? Health Care Analysis 16 (2):127-144.score: 192.0
    There is continuing interest in action research in health care. This is despite action researchers facing major problems getting support for their projects from mainstream sources of R&D funds partly because its validity is disputed and partly because it is difficult to predict or evaluate and is therefore seen as risky. In contrast traditional health science dominates and relies on compliance with strictly defined scientific method and rules of accountability. Critics of scientific health care have highlighted many problems (...)
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  14. Robert J. Baum (1976). Can Governmental Support of Philosophy of Science Research Be Justified? PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1976:289 - 312.score: 186.0
    This paper examines some of the theoretical and philosophical issues associated with the question of government funding, including the definition of 'philosophy of science research' and the problem of distinguishing between "pure" and "applied" research. Suggestions are provided as to what is necessary in order to construct several different kinds of justification for government support of PS research, but no justifications are worked out in detail. This paper was written to provide background material for an oral (...)
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  15. Jimmy Lee Shaw (1985). Ethics, Science and Value Judgments: A Critique of Ethical Issues Within the Methodology of Social Research. Journal of Social Studies Research 9 (1):41-52.score: 186.0
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  16. Marc Applebaum (2012). Phenomenological Psychological Research as Science. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 43 (1):36-72.score: 180.0
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  17. Kenneth Forbus, Jeffrey Usher, Andrew Lovett, Kate Lockwood & Jon Wetzel (2011). CogSketch: Sketch Understanding for Cognitive Science Research and for Education. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):648-666.score: 180.0
    Sketching is a powerful means of working out and communicating ideas. Sketch understanding involves a combination of visual, spatial, and conceptual knowledge and reasoning, which makes it both challenging to model and potentially illuminating for cognitive science. This paper describes CogSketch, an ongoing effort of the NSF-funded Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center, which is being developed both as a research instrument for cognitive science and as a platform for sketch-based educational software. We describe the idea of open-domain (...)
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  18. William H. Starbuck (2006). The Production of Knowledge: The Challenge of Social Science Research. OUP Oxford.score: 180.0
    Bill Starbuck has been one of the leading management researchers over several decades. In this book he reflects on a number of challenges associated with management and social science research - the search for a 'behavioral science', the limits of rationality, the unreliability of many research findings, the social shaping of research agendas, cultures and judgements. It is an engaging, chronologically structured account in which he discusses some of his own research projects and various (...)
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  19. Oliver H. Osborne (1980). Cross-Cultural Social Science Research and Questions of Scientific Medical Imperialism. Bioethics Quarterly 2 (3):159-163.score: 180.0
    Concern for the rights and safety of individuals has caused clinical researchers to develop informed consent protocols for research involving human subjects. The applicapability of these regulations to social science research is often tenuous, since such research usually focuses on populations rather than individuals, and potential damage is apt to be political rather than personal. In cross-cultural social research, the protocols developed by Western clinical researchers may be not only ludicrously inapplicable, but intrusive and disruptive (...)
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  20. Sean Jennings (2012). Response to Schrag: What Are Ethics Committees for Anyway? A Defence of Social Science Research Ethics Review. Research Ethics 8 (2):87-96.score: 180.0
    Zachary Schrag would like to put the burden of proof for continuation of research ethics review in the Social Sciences on those who advocate for research ethics committees (RECs), and asks that we take the concerns that he raises seriously. I separate his concerns into a principled issue and a number of pragmatic issues. The principled issue concerns the justification for having research ethics committees; the pragmatic issues concern questions such as the effectiveness of review and the (...)
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  21. Linda Lobao & Curtis W. Stofferahn (2008). The Community Effects of Industrialized Farming: Social Science Research and Challenges to Corporate Farming Laws. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):219-240.score: 180.0
    Social scientists have a long history of concern with the effects of industrialized farming on communities. Recently, the topic has taken on new importance as corporate farming laws in a number of states are challenged by agribusiness interests. Defense of these laws often requires evidence from social science research that industrialized farming poses risks to communities. A problem is that no recent journal articles or books systematically assess the extent to which research to date provides evidence of (...)
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  22. S. Crasnow (2011). Evidence for Use: Causal Pluralism and the Role of Case Studies in Political Science Research. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (1):26-49.score: 178.0
    Most contemporary political science researchers are advocates of multimethod research, however, the value and proper role of qualitative methodologies, like case study analysis, is disputed. A pluralistic philosophy of science can shed light on this debate. Methodological pluralism is indeed valuable, but does not entail causal pluralism. Pluralism about the goals of science is relevant to the debate and suggests a focus on the difference between evidence for warrant and evidence for use. I propose that case (...)
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  23. James Montmarquet (2003). Moral Character and Social Science Research. Philosophy 78 (3):355-368.score: 174.0
    Gilbert Harman and John Doris (among others) have maintained that experimental studies of human behaviour give good grounds for denying the very existence of moral character. This research, according to Harman and Doris, shows human behaviour to be dependent not on character but mainly on one's ‘situation.’ My paper develops a number of criticisms of this view, among them that social science experiments are ill-suited to study character, insofar as they do not estimate the role of character in (...)
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  24. Sharon Crasnow, Evidence for Use: The Role of Case Studies in Political Science Research.score: 174.0
    In its most recent form, the debate about the relationship between quantitative and qualitative methodology in political science has been shaped by the publication of Designing Social Inquiry: Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research by Gary King, Robert O. Keohane, and Sidney Verba in 1994 (hereafter DSI). The focus of this debate has been case study research. DSI advocates that qualitative research, particularly case study research, be modeled on the template of quantitative research. The authors (...)
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  25. James Dietz & Juan Rogers (2012). Meanings and Policy Implications of “Transformative Research”: Frontiers, Hot Science, Evolution, and Investment Risk. [REVIEW] Minerva 50 (1):21-44.score: 174.0
    In recent times there has been a surge in interest on policy instruments to stimulate scientific and engineering research that is of greater consequence, advancing our knowledge in leaps rather than steps and is therefore more “creative” or, in the language of recent reports, “transformative.” Associated with the language of “transformative research” there appears to be much enthusiasm and conviction that the future of research is tied to it. However, there is very little clarity as to what (...)
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  26. Aldrin E. Sweeney (2006). Social and Ethical Dimensions of Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):435-464.score: 174.0
    Continuing advances in human ability to manipulate matter at the atomic and molecular levels (i.e. nanoscale science and engineering) offer many previously unimagined possibilities for scientific discovery and technological development. Paralleling these advances in the various science and engineering subdisciplines is the increasing realization that a number of associated social, ethical, environmental, economic and legal dimensions also need to be explored. An important component of such exploration entails the identification and analysis of the ways in which current and (...)
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  27. Maria Rentetzi (2008). The U.S. Radium Industry: Industrial In-House Research and the Commercialization of Science. [REVIEW] Minerva 46 (4):437-462.score: 174.0
    A fierce debate ensued after the announcement in 1913 in the U.S.A. that all rights and ownership of radium-bearing ores found on public land would be reserved by the government. At stake was the State monopolization of radium that pitted powerful industrialists with radium claims, mainly in the Colorado area, against the Bureau of Mines and prestigious physicians who wished to reserve radium for medical uses. This article describes the strategies of one of the biggest U.S. radium industries that dominated (...)
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  28. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2009). Free Riders and Pious Sons – Why Science Research Remains Obligatory. Bioethics 23 (3):161-171.score: 168.0
    John Harris has previously proposed that there is a moral duty to participate in scientific research. This concept has recently been challenged by Iain Brassington, who asserts that the principles cited by Harris in support of the duty to research fail to establish its existence. In this paper we address these criticisms and provide new arguments for the existence of a moral obligation to research participation. This obligation, we argue, arises from two separate but related principles. The (...)
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  29. Sharon Crasnow (2012). The Role of Case Study Research in Political Science: Evidence for Causal Claims. Philosophy of Science 79 (5):655-666.score: 168.0
    Political science research, particularly in international relations and comparative politics, has increasingly become dominated by statistical and formal approaches. The promise of these approaches shifted the methodological emphasis away from case study research. In response, supporters of case study research argue that case studies provide evidence for causal claims that is not available through statistical and formal research methods, and many have advocated multimethod research. I propose a way of understanding the integration of multiple (...)
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  30. Juraj Podoba (2012). Qualitative Research and Scientific Knowledge: Social Science in Post-Totalitarian Academia. Human Affairs 22 (4):591-602.score: 168.0
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  31. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent, Sacha Loeve, Alfred Nordmann & Astrid Schwarz (2011). Matters of Interest: The Objects of Research in Science and Technoscience. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 42 (2):365-383.score: 162.0
    This discussion paper proposes that a meaningful distinction between science and technoscience can be found at the level of the objects of research. Both notions intermingle in the attitudes, intentions, programs and projects of researchers and research institutions—that is, on the side of the subjects of research. But the difference between science and technoscience becomes more explicit when research results are presented in particular settings and when the objects of research are exhibited for (...)
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  32. Michael Davis & Kelly Laas (2014). “Broader Impacts” or “Responsible Research and Innovation”? A Comparison of Two Criteria for Funding Research in Science and Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):963-983.score: 162.0
    Our subject is how the experience of Americans with a certain funding criterion, “broader impacts” (and some similar criteria) may help in efforts to turn the European concept of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) into a useful guide to funding Europe’s scientific and technical research. We believe this comparison may also be as enlightening for Americans concerned with revising research policy. We have organized our report around René Von Schomberg’s definition of RRI, since it seems both to (...)
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  33. Michelle Anne Maher, Joanna Gilmore & David Feldon (2013). Cognitive Apprenticeship and the Supervision of Science and Engineering Research Assistants. Journal of Research Practice 9 (2):Article M5 (proof).score: 162.0
    We explore and critically reflect on the process of science and engineering research assistant skill development both within laboratory-based research teams and, when no team is present, within the faculty supervisor-research assistant interactions. Using a performance-based measure of research skill development, we identify research assistants who, over the course of an academic year of service as a researcher, markedly developed, modestly developed, or failed to develop their research skills. Interviews with these research (...)
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  34. Karen Z. Naufel & Denise R. Beike (2013). The Ethical Treatment of Research Assistants: Are We Forsaking Safety for Science? Journal of Research Practice 9 (2):Article M11 (proof).score: 162.0
    Science inevitably involves ethical discussions about how research should be implemented. However such discussions often neglect the potential unethical treatment of a third party: the research assistant. Extensive anecdotal evidence suggests that research assistants can experience unique physical, psychological, and social risks when implementing their typical responsibilities. Moreover, these research assistants, who perhaps engage in research experience to bolster their curricula vitae, may feel coerced to continue to work in unsafe environments out of fear (...)
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  35. Alison Wray & Mike Wallace (2011). Accelerating the Development of Expertise: A Step-Change in Social Science Research Capacity Building. British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (3):241 - 264.score: 162.0
    It is argued that future research capacity building for the social sciences needs to incorporate methods to accelerate the acquisition by researchers of holistic expertise relevant to their roles as researchers and as developers of others. An agenda is presented, based on a model of learning that highlights missing elements of current provision, and two approaches currently under development are described.
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  36. Jason W. Osborne & Margaret R. Blanchard (2010). Random Responding From Participants is a Threat to the Validity of Social Science Research Results. Frontiers in Psychology 1:220-220.score: 162.0
    Research in the social sciences often relies upon the motivation and goodwill of research participants (e.g., teachers, students, minimally-compensated volunteers) to do their best on low stakes assessments of the effects of interventions. Research participants who are unmotivated to perform well can engage in random responding on outcome measures, which can cause substantial mis-estimation of results, biasing results toward the null hypothesis. Data from a recent educational intervention study served as a clear example of this problem: participants (...)
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  37. Melanie Killen, Kelly Lynn Mulvey, Aline Hitti & Adam Rutland (2012). What Works to Address Prejudice? Look to Developmental Science Research for the Answer. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):29-29.score: 158.0
    Developmental perspectives on prejudice provide a fundamental and important key to the puzzle for determining how to address prejudice. Research with historically disadvantaged and advantaged groups in childhood and adolescence reveals the complexity of social cognitive and moral judgments about prejudice, discrimination, bias, and exclusion. Children are aware of status and hierarchies, and often reject the status quo. Intervention, to be effective, must happen early in development, before prejudice and stereotypes are deeply entrenched.
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  38. Desh Raj Sirswal, The Problem of Mind, Cognitive Science and Integrated Research Methodology.score: 156.0
    There are numerous aspects of the nature of man, and each aspect gives rise to many problems. Some of these problems are comparatively simple, other deep and perplexing. Throughout time, people have made distinction between the material or physical world and mental or psychical world, the former may be perceived by any observer; the later remains a private experience. Philosophy of mind, today dealing with four issues: the nature of mind and body, mental content, mental causation and consciousness. The nature (...)
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  39. Michael Feuer & Christina Maranto (2010). Science Advice as Procedural Rationality: Reflections on the National Research Council. [REVIEW] Minerva 48 (3):259-275.score: 156.0
    Since its founding in 1863, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has occupied a special niche in the complex ecology of advice-giving in the United States. Established as a small, private organization with special responsibilities and obligations vis à vis the American people and government, the Academy has expanded considerably in the past century and a half and now releases, through the National Research Council (NRC), its operating arm, more than 200 reports per year, on topics covering nearly the (...)
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  40. Michael R. Matthews (ed.) (2014). International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer.score: 156.0
    This inaugural handbook documents the distinctive research field that utilizes history and philosophy in investigation of theoretical, curricular and pedagogical issues in the teaching of science and mathematics. It is contributed to by 130 researchers from 30 countries; it provides a logically structured, fully referenced guide to the ways in which science and mathematics education is, informed by the history and philosophy of these disciplines, as well as by the philosophy of education more generally. The first handbook (...)
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  41. Jonathan Parker, Bridget Penhale & David Stanley (2011). Research Ethics Review: Social Care and Social Science Research and the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):380-400.score: 156.0
    This paper considers concerns that social care research may be stifled by health-focused ethical scrutiny under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the requirement for an ?appropriate body? to determine ethical approval for research involving people who are deemed to lack capacity under the Act to make decisions concerning their participation and consent in research. The current study comprised an online survey of current practice in university research ethics committees (URECs), and explored through semi-structured interviews the (...)
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  42. S. L. Jennings (2010). Two Models of Social Science Research Ethics Review. Research Ethics 6 (3):86-90.score: 156.0
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  43. Ken Kollman (2012). The Potential Value of Computational Models in Social Science Research. In Harold Kincaid (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Social Science. Oxford University Press. 355.score: 156.0
  44. Felice J. Levine & Paula R. Skedsvold (2008). Behavioral and Social Science Research. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press. 336.score: 156.0
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  45. Reinhard Bendix (forthcoming). Western Europe as the Object and Source of Social Science Research. Social Research.score: 156.0
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  46. Matthew R. Goodrum (2009). The History of Human Origins Research and its Place in the History of Science: Research Problems and Historiography. History of Science 47 (3):337.score: 156.0
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  47. James M. DuBois (2006). Ethics in Behavioral and Social Science Research. In Ana Smith Iltis (ed.), Research Ethics. Routledge.score: 156.0
     
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  48. J. Lewis (2010). Ethics Principles for Social Science Research: Report of a Meeting on 22 March 2010 Jointly Sponsored by AREC, the Social Research Association and the Academy of Social Sciences. [REVIEW] Research Ethics 6 (2):56-57.score: 156.0
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  49. Dennis John Mazur (2007). Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans: A Guide for Irb Members. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 156.0
    Biomedical research on humans is an important part of medical progress. But, when lives are at risk, safety and ethical practices need to be the top priority. The need for the committees that regulate and oversee such research -- institutional review boards, or IRBs -- is growing. IRB members face difficult decisions every day. Evaluating the Science and Ethics of Research on Humans is a guide for new and veteran members of IRBs that will help them (...)
     
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  50. Sara Lewis Miskevich (1996). Killing the Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs: Ethical Issues in Social Science Research on the Internet. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (2):241-242.score: 156.0
     
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