Search results for 'Science and civilization' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Vir Singh (2012). Science, Civilization and Happiness. A Vision of Hope. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (3):27-37.score: 60.0
    Science took a wrong turn with the birth of its daughter, the technology, with whose guidance the civilization ushered in the Industrial Age in mid-18th century. From here a drama of science’s increasing dominance over civilization began. The sciencecivilization marriage has been quite inconvenient. However, the civilization, at this juncture, cannot divorce science. Its dependence on science and technology has increased to an extent that without it the world will come almost (...)
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  2. Gerhard Endress, Rüdiger Arnzen & J. Thielmann (eds.) (2004). Words, Texts, and Concepts Cruising the Mediterranean Sea: Studies on the Sources, Contents and Influences of Islamic Civilization and Arabic Philosophy and Science: Dedicated to Gerhard Endress on His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Peeters.score: 60.0
    This statement by the late Franz Rosenthal is, in a sense, the uniting theme of the present volume's 35 articles by renowned scholars of Islamic Studies, Middle ...
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  3. Nicholas Maxwell (1994). Towards a New Enlightenment: What the Task of Creating Civilization has to Learn From the Success of Modern Science. In Ronald Barnett (ed.), Academic Community: Discourse or Discord? Jessica Kingsley.score: 54.0
    We face two great probems of learning: learning about the universe and about ourselves as a part of the universe, and learning how to create world civilization. We have solved the first problem, but not the second. We need to learn from our solution to the first problem how to solve the second. That involves getting clear about the nature of the progress-achieving methods of science, generalizing these methods so that they become fruitfully applicable to any problematic endeavour, (...)
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  4. Bruce J. Petrie (2010). William Sims Bainbridge. The Warcraft Civilization: Social Science in a Virtual World. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):270-272.score: 48.0
    New branches of social science primarily engaging the “internet revolution” are appearing alongside mainstream research and journals such as Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking are providing social scientists with an outlet of peer-reviewed research. HPS scholars will find new methodologies and the relation of technology to social science of particularly interest. Social scientists are becoming increasingly interested in virtual realities (see Milburn (Spontaneous Generations 2008, 63)) and are declaring time spent “in-game” ethnographic research. William Sims Bainbridge boasts 2300+ (...)
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  5. Nicholas Maxwell (2000). Can Humanity Learn to Become Civilized? The Crisis of Science Without Civilization. Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):29–44.score: 42.0
    Two great problems of learning confront humanity: learning about the nature of the universe and our place in it, and learning how to become civilized. The first problem was solved, in essence, in the 17th century, with the creation of modern science. But the second problem has not yet been solved. Solving the first problem without also solving the second puts us in a situation of great danger. All our current global problems have arisen as a result. What we (...)
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  6. R. G. Collingwood (1992/1984). The New Leviathan, or, Man, Society, Civilization, and Barbarism. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    The New Leviathan, originally published in 1942, a few months before the author's death, is the book which R. G. Collingwood chose to write in preference to completing his life's work on the philosophy of history. It was a reaction to the Second World War and the threat which Nazism and Fascism constituted to civilization. The book draws upon many years of work in moral and political philosophy and attempts to establish the multiple and complex connections between the levels (...)
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  7. Keith Parsons (2002). Critical Notice: Scientific Civilization and its Discontents: Further Reflections on the Science Wars. Philosophy of Science 69 (4):645-651.score: 42.0
    This essay reviews two recent books commenting on, and contributing to, the “science wars.” In Who Rules in Science? James Robert Brown respectfully but firmly rejects the “nihilist” and the “naturalist” wings of social constructivism. He rejects attempts to debunk science in the name of a relativist or anarchist epistemology. He also criticizes the “strong programme” in the sociology of knowledge and its implied contrast between reasons and causes. In Prometheus Bedeviled Norman Levitt examines the cultural roots (...)
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  8. Robert Andrews Millikan (1971). Science and the New Civilization. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 42.0
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  9. Solly Zuckerman Zuckerman (1966). Scientists and War: The Impact of Science on Military and Civil Affairs. London, H. Hamilton.score: 42.0
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  10. Nicholas Maxwell (2012). The Menace of Science Without Civilization: From Knowledge to Wisdom. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (3):39-63.score: 39.0
    We are in a state of impending crisis. And the fault lies in part with academia. For two centuries or so, academia has been devoted to the pursuit of knowledge and technological know-how. This has enormously increased our power to act which has, in turn, brought us both all the great benefits of the modern world and the crises we now face. Modern science and technology have made possible modern industry and agriculture, the explosive growth of the world’s population, (...)
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  11. Nicholas Maxwell (2009). From Knowledge to Wisdom. In David Cayley (ed.), Ideas on the Nature of Science. Goose Lane Editions.score: 39.0
    There are these two absolutely basic problems: to learn about the universe and ourselves as a part of the universe, and to learn how to create a civilized world. Essentially, we have solved the first problem. We solved it when we created modern science. That is not to say that we know everything that is to be known, but we created a method for improving our knowledge about the world. But we haven't solved the second problem. And to solve (...)
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  12. Victor Lowe, Charles Hartshorne & A. H. Johnson (eds.) (1972). Whitehead and the Modern World; Science, Metaphysics, and Civilization. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 39.0
    Whitehead's Philosophy of Science By VICTOR LOWE BOTH AS AN INVESTIGATOR of the foundations of mathematics and as a philosopher, Alfred North Whitehead ...
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  13. Frank E. Hartung (1959). Book Review:The Science of Culture: A Study of Man and Civilization Leslie A. White. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 26 (3):274-.score: 39.0
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  14. Nicholas Maxwell (2013). The Menace of Science Without Civilization. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (3):39-63.score: 39.0
    We are in a state of impending crisis. And the fault lies in part with academia. For two centuries or so, academia has been devoted to the pursuit of knowledge and technological know-how. This has enormously increased our power to act which has, in turn, brought us both all the great benefits of the modern world and the crises we now face. Modern science and technology have made possible modern industry and agriculture, the explosive growth of the world’s population, (...)
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  15. Sheldon Ackley (1952). Book Review:Science and Civilization Robert C. Stauffer. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 19 (1):91-.score: 39.0
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  16. Zaheer Baber & Lewis Pyenson (1997). The Science of Empire: Scientific Knowledge, Civilization, and Colonial Rule in India. Annals of Science 54 (2):211-212.score: 39.0
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  17. William H. Baumer (1971). Science and Civilization in Islam. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 2 (2):183-190.score: 39.0
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  18. Ravinder Kumar (1995). Reflections on the Proposal:'A History of Science, Philosophy and Culture in Indian Civilization'. In Surendra Nath Sen (ed.), Science, Philosophy, and Culture in Historical Perspective. Project of History of Indian Science, Philosophy, and Culture. 1--152.score: 39.0
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  19. Guy Ortolano (2005). FR Leavis, Science, and the Abiding Crisis of Modern Civilization. History of Science 43:161-185.score: 39.0
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  20. Lewis Pyenson (1993). Prerogatives of European Intellect: Historians of Science and the Promotion of Western Civilization. History of Science 31:289-315.score: 39.0
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  21. Nicholas Maxwell (1992). What the Task of Creating Civilization has to Learn From the Success of Modern Science: Towards a New Enlightenment. Reflections on Higher Education 4:47-69.score: 37.0
    Modern scientific, academic inquiry suffers from a serious, wholesale fundamental defect. Though very successful at improving specialized scientific knowledge and technological know-how, it is an intellectual and human disaster when it comes to helping us realize what is of value in life - in particlar, when it comes to helping us create a more enlightened, civilized world.
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  22. Nicholas Maxwell (1997). Science and the Environment: A New Enlightenment. Science and Public Affairs (Spring 1997):50-56.score: 37.0
    Nicholas Maxwell believes that while we have developed an excellent way of learning about the nature of the universe, we have so far failed in our attempts to apply this method to create a civilized world.
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  23. José Ferreirós (2009). C.K. Raju. Cultural Foundations of Mathematics: The Nature of Mathematical Proof and the Transmission of the Calculus From India to Europe in the 16th C. Ce. History of Science, Philosophy and Culture in Indian Civilization. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 17 (3):nkn028.score: 36.0
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  24. Daniel Lee Kleinman (2005). Science and Technology in Society: From Biotechnology to the Internet. Blackwell Pub..score: 36.0
    This thoughtful and engaging text challenges the widely held notion of science as somehow outside of society, and the idea that technology proceeds automatically down a singular and inevitable path. Through specific case studies involving contemporary debates, this book shows that science and technology are fundamentally part of society and are shaped by it. Draws on concepts from political sociology, organizational analysis, and contemporary social theory. Avoids dense theoretical debate. Includes case studies and concluding chapter summaries for students (...)
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  25. Nicholas Maxwell (2007). From Knowledge to Wisdom: A Revolution for Science and the Humanities (Second Edition). Pentire Press.score: 36.0
    From Knowledge to Wisdom argues that there is an urgent need, for both intellectual and humanitarian reasons, to bring about a revolution in science and the humanities. The outcome would be a kind of academic inquiry rationally devoted to helping humanity learn how to create a better world. Instead of giving priority to solving problems of knowledge, as at present, academia would devote itself to helping us solve our immense, current global problems – climate change, war, poverty, population growth, (...)
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  26. Naomi Zack (2002). Philosophy of Science and Race. Routledge.score: 36.0
    In this concisely argued, short new book, well-known philosopher Naomi Zack explores the scientific and philosophical problems in applying a biological conception of race to human beings. Through the systematic analysis of up-to-date data and conclusions in population genetics, transmission genetics, and biological anthropology, Zack provides a comprehensive conceptual account of how "race" in the ordinary sense has no basis in science. Her book combats our everyday understanding of race as a scientifically supported taxonomy of human beings, and in (...)
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  27. N. Bammate (1959). The Status of Science and Technique in Islamic Civilization. Philosophy East and West 9 (1/2):23-25.score: 36.0
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  28. Casper Bruun Jensen & Kjetil Rödje (eds.) (2010). Deleuzian Intersections: Science, Technology, Anthropology. Berghahn Books.score: 36.0
    This volume outlines a Deleuzian approach to analyzing science, culture and politics.
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  29. M. W. F. Stone & Jonathan Wolff (eds.) (2000). The Proper Ambition of Science. Routledge.score: 36.0
    What is the proper relation between the scientific worldview and other parts or aspects of human knowledge and experience? Can any science aim at "complete coverage" of the world, and if it does, will it undermine--in principle or by tendency--other attempts to describe or understand the world? Should morality, theology and other areas resist or be protected from scientific treatment? Questions of this sort have been of pressing philosophical concern since antiquity. The Proper Ambition of Science presents ten (...)
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  30. H. H. Dubs (1955). Science and Civilization in China. By Joseph Needham, F.R.S., with the Research Assistance of L. Wang. Volume I, “Introductory Orientations.' [Pp. Xxxviii + 318, with 36 Figures, 13 Plates, 9 Tables, and Two Folded-in Maps.] (Cambridge: The University Press, 1954. Price 52s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 30 (115):362-.score: 36.0
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  31. V. C. C. (1956). Science and Civilization in China, Vol. 2, History of Scientific Thought. Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):366-367.score: 36.0
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  32. Dimitri Gutas, Felicitas Meta Maria Opwis & David Reisman (eds.) (2012). Islamic Philosophy, Science, Culture, and Religion: Studies in Honor of Dimitri Gutas. Brill.score: 36.0
    This collection of essays covers the classical heritage and Islamic culture, classical Arabic science and philosophy, and Muslim religious sciences, showing continuation of Greek and Persian thought as well as original Muslim contributions ...
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  33. H. H. Dubs (1960). Science and Civilization in China: Volume 2, History of Scientific Thought. By Joseph Needham, F.R.S., with the Research Assistance of Wang Ling, Ph.D. (Cambridge University Press. 1956. Pp. Xxiv + 697. Price 80s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 35 (133):167-.score: 36.0
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  34. S. J. Chapman (1901). Book Review:The Science of Civilization. Cecil Balfour. [REVIEW] Ethics 11 (4):536-.score: 36.0
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  35. Małgorzata Czarnocka (2012). Civilization and Science. Part II. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (4):5-6.score: 36.0
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  36. Editors (2012). Civilization and Science. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (3):5-6.score: 36.0
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  37. Jeanette Edwards, Penelope Harvey & Peter Wade (eds.) (2007). Anthropology and Science: Epistemologies in Practice. Berg.score: 36.0
    What does it mean to know something - scientifically, anthropologically, socially? What is the relationship between different forms of knowledge and ways of knowing? How is knowledge mobilised in society and to what ends? Drawing on ethnographic examples from across the world, and from the virtual and global "places" created by new information technologies, Anthropology and Science presents examples of living and dynamic epistemologies and practices, and of how scientific ways of knowing operate in the world. Authors address the (...)
     
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  38. Glenn Negley (1942). Book Review:Studies in Civilization. University of Pennsylvania Bicentennial Conference; Studies in the History of Science. University of Pennsylvania Bicentennial Conference. [REVIEW] Ethics 52 (3):385-.score: 36.0
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  39. Michio Kaku (1997). Visions: How Science Will Revolutionize the 21st Century. Anchor Books.score: 36.0
    In a spellbinding narrative that skillfully weaves together cutting-edge research among today's foremost scientists, theoretical physicist Michio Kaku--author of the bestselling book Hyperspace --presents a bold, exhilarating adventure into the science of tomorrow. In Visions, Dr. Kaku examines in vivid detail how the three scientific revolutions that profoundly reshaped the twentieth century--the quantum, biogenetic, and computer revolutions--will transform the way we live in the twenty-first century. The fundamental elements of matter and life--the particles of the atom and the nucleus (...)
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  40. Andrzej Kiepas (2013). Eco-Philosophy and the Rationality of Science and Technology. Henryk Skolimowski's Criticism of Technological Civilization. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (4):127-139.score: 36.0
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  41. T. Michniowski (2000). Technological Humanity--Civilization Induced by Science. Dialogue and Universalism 10:99-106.score: 36.0
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  42. Soraya Nour & Olivier Remaud (eds.) (2010). War and Peace: The Role of Science and Art. Duncker & Humblot.score: 36.0
    Violence -- Poliltical philosophy -- Critical theory -- Science and arts in international relations -- Psyche -- Aesthetics -- Tolstoi's War and peace.
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  43. Karl-Heinz Pohl, Anselm W. Müller Leiden, Numbers From Han, Kwok Siu Tong, Chan Sin, Joshua W. C. Cutler & Imagining Karma (2003). Advaita Vedanta. Edited by R. Balasubramanian. Volume II, Part 2 of History of Science, Philosophy and Culture in Indian Civilization, Edited by DP Chatto-Padhyaya. New Delhi: Centre for Studies in Civilizations, 2000. Pp. Xxiii+ 417. Price Not Given. Aesthetics & Chaos: Investigating a Creative Complicity. Edited by Grazia March. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 53 (4):618-619.score: 36.0
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  44. Dhruv Raina (1998). Beyond Tile Diffusionist History of Colonial Science Review of The Science of Empire: Scientific Knowledge, Civilization and Colonial Rule in India. Social Epistemology 12:203-213.score: 36.0
     
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  45. F. C. S. Schiller (1924). Science and Civilization. Unity Series VI. The Eugenics Review 16 (2):147.score: 36.0
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  46. Włodzimierz Ługowski (2012). Who Set the Standards of Science Today (in So-Called “Our” Civilization)? Dialogue and Universalism 22 (4):121-131.score: 36.0
    Introducing the issue of the beginnings of life into the realm of scientific research posed a danger for the valid structures of knowledge. For a couple of tens of years, scientists have dealt with this issue ignoring the “touchy” problem of its “extrascientific” (i.e. philosophical, or even worse, “political”) groundings and its consequences for the Weltanschauung. In the face of new challenges, this strategy proved to be erroneous.
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  47. Kathleen Kuiper (ed.) (2010). The Ideas That Change the World: The Essential Guide to Modern Philosophy, Science, Math, and the Arts. Fall River Press/Britannica Educational Pub. In Association with Rosen Educational Services.score: 34.0
    The biological sciences -- Mathematics and the physical sciences -- The arts -- The social sciences, philosophy, and religion -- Politics and the law.
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  48. Nicholas Maxwell (2010). The Urgent Need for an Academic Revolution. In Mark Levene, Rob Johnson & Richard Maguire (eds.), History at the End of the World? History, Climate Change and the Possibility of Closure. Humanities-EBooks.score: 33.0
    Two great problems of learning confront humanity: first, learning about the nature of the universe and about ourselves as a part of the universe, and second, learning how to live wisely – learning how to make progress towards as good a world as possible. The first problem was solved, in essence, in the 17th century, with the creation of modern science. A method was discovered for progressively improving knowledge and understanding of the natural world, the famous empirical method of (...)
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  49. Harvie Ferguson (1990). The Science of Pleasure: Cosmos and Psyche in the Bourgeois World View. Routledge.score: 33.0
    Examines the formation, structure and collapse of the bourgeois world view, exploring the concepts of fun, happiness, pleasure, and excitement.
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  50. A. B. Arons (1964). Science & Ideas. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.score: 33.0
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