Search results for 'Science communication' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Carol L. Rogers (2000). Making the Audience a Key Participant in the Science Communication Process. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):553-557.score: 246.0
    The public communication of science and technology has become increasingly important over the last several decades. However, understanding the audience that receives this information remains the weak link in the science communication process. This essay provides a brief review of some of the issues involved, discusses results from an audience-based study, and suggests some strategies that both scientists and journalists can use to modify media coverage in ways that can help audiences better understand major public issues (...)
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  2. Maja Horst (2011). Taking Our Own Medicine: On an Experiment in Science Communication. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):801-815.score: 246.0
    In 2007 a social scientist and a designer created a spatial installation to communicate social science research about the regulation of emerging science and technology. The rationale behind the experiment was to improve scientific knowledge production by making the researcher sensitive to new forms of reactions and objections. Based on an account of the conceptual background to the installation and the way it was designed, the paper discusses the nature of the engagement enacted through the experiment. It is (...)
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  3. Marko Ahteensuu (2012). Assumptions of the Deficit Model Type of Thinking: Ignorance, Attitudes, and Science Communication in the Debate on Genetic Engineering in Agriculture. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):295-313.score: 240.0
    This paper spells out and discusses four assumptions of the deficit model type of thinking. The assumptions are: First, the public is ignorant of science. Second, the public has negative attitudes towards (specific instances of) science and technology. Third, ignorance is at the root of these negative attitudes. Fourth, the public’s knowledge deficit can be remedied by one-way science communication from scientists to citizens. It is argued that there is nothing wrong with ignorance-based explanations per se. (...)
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  4. David Ludwig (forthcoming). Extended Cognition in Science Communication. Public Understanding of Science.score: 216.0
  5. Frédéric Vandermoere & Raf Vanderstraeten (2012). Disciplinary Networks and Bounding: Scientific Communication Between Science and Technology Studies and the History of Science. [REVIEW] Minerva 50 (4):451-470.score: 192.0
    This article examines the communication networks within and between science and technology studies (STS) and the history of science. In particular, journal relatedness data are used to analyze some of the structural features of their disciplinary identities and relationships. The results first show that, although the history of science is more than half a century older than STS, the size of the STS network is more than twice that of the history of science network. Further, (...)
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  6. A. Scholl (2010). Radical Constructivism in Communication Science. Constructivist Foundations 6 (1):51-57.score: 192.0
    Purpose: Describing how radical constructivism was introduced to communication science and analyzing why it has not yet become a mainstream endeavour. Situation: Before radical constructivism entered the relevant debates in communication sciences, moderate constructivist positions had already been developed. Problem: Radical constructivists’ argumentation has often been provocative and exaggerating in style, and extreme in its position. This has provoked harsh reactions within the mainstream scientific community. Several argumentative strategies have been used to degrade radical constructivist arguments and (...)
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  7. Christopher H. Lowrey & Priya Venkatesan (2008). Making Science Accessible: A Semiotics of Scientific Communication. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 1 (2):253-269.score: 192.0
    This article serves as a demonstration of how certain models of literary analysis, used to theorize and analyze fiction and narrative, can also be applied to scientific communication in such a manner as to promote the accessibility of science to the general public and a greater awareness of the methodology used in making scientific discovery. The approach of this article is based on the assumption that the principles of structuralism and semiotics can provide plausible explanations for the divide (...)
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  8. Tobin Nellhaus (2004). From Embodiment to Agency: Cognitive Science, Critical Realism and Communication Frameworks. Journal of Critical Realism 3 (1):103-132.score: 186.0
    The primacy of practice in the development of knowledge is one of materialism’s fundamental tenets. Most arguments supporting it have been strictly philosophical. However, over the past thirty years cognitive science has provided mounting evidence supporting the primacy of practice. Particularly striking is its finding that thought is fundamentally metaphoric—that images emerging from everyday embodied activities not only make ordinary experiences intelligible, but also underpin our more abstract engagements with the world, elaborated in disciplines such as ethics and (...). Cognitive science’s implications must now be absorbed into critical realism. Cognitive science bolsters critical realism by providing a scientifically-grounded analysis of the passage from body to mind and the fundamental unity between them, while sustaining their distinctiveness. Its implications for critical realism ripple out in four waves: first, critical realism’s understanding of the mind/body relationship; second, its concepts of the process that connects theory and practice, and what that means for critical realism’s view of intellectual production, the place of metaphor in scientific theorization, and cultural development; its view of culture as a complexwhole; and finally, its theory of human agency as embodied and intentional. (shrink)
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  9. M. Clarke (2009). Ethics of Science Communication on the Web. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 9:9-12.score: 156.0
  10. Patricia Osseweijer (2006). A New Model for Science Communication That Takes Ethical Considerations Into Account. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):591-593.score: 156.0
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  11. S. Suhr (2009). INTRODUCTION Science Communication in a Changing World Stephanie Suhr. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 9:1-4.score: 156.0
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  12. Barry Barnes & David Edge (1982). The Organization of Academic Science: Communication and Control. In Barry Barnes & David O. Edge (eds.), Science in Context: Readings in the Sociology of Science. Mit Press. 13--20.score: 156.0
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  13. Gustav Holmberg (2007). Taming Tempests Through Telegraphy and Media Appearances: Science Communication and the Construction of a Swedish Storm-Warning System Before the Great War. Annals of Science 64 (1):77-91.score: 156.0
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  14. Arne Schirrmacher (2013). Popular Science as Cultural Dispositif: On the German Way of Science Communication in the Twentieth Century. Science in Context 26 (3):473-508.score: 156.0
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  15. Jiang Yang (2013). The Intervention And Impact of History of Science on Science Communication: From Contents to Standpoints. Science and Society 2:010.score: 156.0
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  16. James R. Weber & Charlotte Schell Word (2001). The Communication Process as Evaluative Context: What Do Nonscientists Hear When Scientists Speak? Scientists and Nonscientists Benefit by Recognizing That Attempts at Mutual Influence, Multiple Frames of Reference, and “Objective” Information in Science Communication Are Not Neutral but Evaluated with Other Social Influences. BioScience 51 (6):487-495.score: 150.0
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  17. Andrea Candela (2010). Climate Sciences and Scientific Method Between Science Communication and Sociology of Knowledge. Epistemologia 33 (2):235-256.score: 150.0
     
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  18. Tetsuji Iseda (2010). Mode 2 Science and Science Communication: From an Epistemological Perspective. Kagaku Tetsugaku 43 (2):1-17.score: 150.0
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  19. Rosaleen Love (1998). Science Communication: A Growth Area in Science and Technology Studies. [REVIEW] Metascience 7 (2):281-289.score: 150.0
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  20. N. Sanitt (ed.) (2005). Motivating Science: Science Communication From a Philosophical, Educational and Cultural Perspective. Pantaneto Press.score: 150.0
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  21. Douglas Walton (2000). The Place of Dialogue Theory in Logic, Computer Science and Communication Studies. Synthese 123 (3):327-346.score: 144.0
    Dialogue theory, although it has ancient roots, was put forward in the 1970s in logic as astructure that can be useful for helping to evaluate argumentation and informal fallacies.Recently, however, it has been taken up as a broader subject of investigation in computerscience. This paper surveys both the historical and philosophical background of dialoguetheory and the latest research initiatives on dialogue theory in computer science. The main components of dialogue theory are briefly explained. Included is a classification of the (...)
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  22. A. Donk (2011). All Quiet on the Constructivism Front – Or is There a Substantial Contribution of Non-Dualistic Approaches for Communication Science? Constructivist Foundations 7 (1):27-29.score: 144.0
    Open peer commentary on the target article “From Objects to Processes: A Proposal to Rewrite Radical Constructivism” by Siegfried J. Schmidt. Upshot: In the 1990s the emergence of radical constructivism as a meta-theory inspired many scientific disciplines. Since more or less simple realistic concepts of the media as mirroring the world prevailed, communication science was challenged to re-think the relation of media and reality as well. Recently, criticism of constructivist media theory has grown, while those constructivst approaches have (...)
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  23. Flor Ángela Tobón Marulanda & López Giraldo (2013). A cognitive and applied linguistic to a science for a transdiciplinary communication. Humanidades Médicas 13 (3):586-605.score: 144.0
    Se presentan los resultados de una investigación cualitativa hermenéutica sobre la lingüística cognitiva y la lingüística aplicada, relacionadas con otras ciencias en un contexto específico de la comunidad científica especializada. Desde una visión integral y holística de las ciencias biomédicas y humanas, asimismo, se estudian los lenguajes técnico-científicos de la ciencia y de la tecnología para facilitar la interrelación cognitiva entre las diferentes disciplinas. Este estudio permite crear capacidades para evaluar el acervo léxico en contexto, útil para la transmisión y (...)
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  24. Jerome Rothstein (1958). Communication, Organization, and Science. [Indian Hills, Colo.]Falcon's Wing Press.score: 132.0
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  25. Jeff Shrager, Dorrit Billman, Gregorio Convertino, J. P. Massar & Peter Pirolli (2010). Soccer Science and the Bayes Community: Exploring the Cognitive Implications of Modern Scientific Communication. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (1):53-72.score: 130.0
  26. Babette Babich (2009). Jaspers, Heidegger, and Arendt: On Politics, Science, and Communication. Existence 4 (1):1-19.score: 126.0
    Heidegger's 1950 claim to Jaspers (later repeated in his Spiegel interview), that his Nietzsche lectures represented a "resistance" to Nazism is premised on the understanding that he and Jaspers have of the place of science in the Western world. Thus Heidegger can emphasize Nietzsche's epistemology, parsing Nietzsche's will to power, contra Nazi readings, as the metaphysical culmination of the domination of the West by scientism and technologism. It is in this sense that Heidegger argues that German Nazism is "in (...)
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  27. György Márkus (2007). Condorcet: Communication/Science/Democracy. Critical Horizons 8 (1):18-32.score: 126.0
    Condorcet's arguments concerning the dependence of unhindered scientific development on the presence of democratic conditions still sounds relevant today, because they are based on specific and complex considerations concerning the character of the social enterprise of science that articulates problems that still continue. The implicit dispute between Condorcet and Rousseau is also the first great historical example of the conflict between the Enlightenment and Romanticism, which accompanies the history of modernity, as an unresolved and indeed irresolvable opposition that belongs (...)
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  28. Hsiao‐Ching She & Darrell Fisher (2000). The Development of a Questionnaire to Describe Science Teacher Communication Behavior in Taiwan and Australia. Science Education 84 (6):706-726.score: 126.0
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  29. Norman Davies (2001). History as a Universal Science and a Creative Art of Communication. In A. Koj & Piotr Sztompka (eds.), Images of the World: Science, Humanities, Art. Jagiellonian University. 119.score: 126.0
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  30. L. U. O. Hong (2012). How to Crack a Science Nut More Easily——Analysis on the Communication Techniques of Science Squirrel Website. Science and Society 1:013.score: 126.0
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  31. Xiang Huang (2005). The Trading Zone Communication of Scientific Knowledge: An Examination of Jesuit Science in China (1582–1773). Science in Context 18 (3):393.score: 126.0
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  32. Anton Oleinik (2009). Inquiring Into Communication in Science: Alternative Approaches. Science in Context 22 (4):613.score: 126.0
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  33. Joseph L. Polman & Roy D. Pea (2001). Transformative Communication as a Cultural Tool for Guiding Inquiry Science. Science Education 85 (3):223-238.score: 126.0
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  34. John Durham Peters (1990). Rhetoric's Revival, Positivism's Persistence: Social Science, Clear Communication, and the Public Space. Sociological Theory 8 (2):224-231.score: 120.0
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  35. José Manuel Chillón Lorenzo (2013). " Communication Science: Professional, Popular, Literary", de Nicholas Russell. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 32 (3):195-200.score: 120.0
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  36. Martine Benjamin, Joseph C. Bertolini, Costica Bradatan, Peter Burke, Christian R. Donath, Geoffrey Kemp, David W. Lovell, Martyn Lyons & Alexander Mikaberidze (2011). Kevin A. Aho, Philosophy Department, Florida Gulf Coast University, USA Philip C. Aka, Department of Political Science, Chicago State University, USA Mihaela Albu, Department of Journalism and Communication, University of Craiova, Romania Georgios Anagnostopoulos, Philosophy Department, University of California at San Diego, USA. The European Legacy 16 (7):1006-1007.score: 120.0
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  37. Paul Durbin (1968). Communication: Science as a Social System. World Futures 7 (1):55-72.score: 120.0
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  38. S. E. (1984). Secrecy and Freedom of Communication in American Science. Minerva 22 (3-4):421-423.score: 120.0
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  39. Dominique Namur & Sandrine Paillard (2006). Science et communication : Promettre ou éclairer. Hermes 44:107.score: 120.0
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  40. John Palen, Jane Gregory & Steve Miller (1999). Science in the Public EyeScience in Public: Communication, Culture and Credibility. BioScience 49 (1):75.score: 120.0
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  41. Peter Simonson (2001). Science and the Media: Alternative Routes in Scientific Communication. Social Epistemology 16 (2):181 – 184.score: 120.0
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  42. William Allen (2001). A News Media Perspective on Environmental Communication The Culture of Newsrooms and the Culture of Science Differ Considerably, but by Understanding These Differences, Biologists Can Make Communicating Science News to the Public Efficient, Enjoyable, and Productive. BioScience 51 (4):289-291.score: 120.0
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  43. Catherine H. Gleason (2001). Practical Communication, Science, and the Cultural Void of Magic. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (2):329-339.score: 120.0
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  44. Leon Henkin (1960). Review: Jerome Rothstein, C. A. Muses, Communication, Organization and Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 25 (3):256-256.score: 120.0
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  45. Hidetoshi Kihara (2010). Neoliberal Bias of Science & Technology Communication. Kagaku Tetsugaku 43 (2):47-65.score: 120.0
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  46. Herbert Menzel (1968). Informal Communication in Science: Its Advantages and its Formal Analogues. In Edward B. Montgomery (ed.), The Foundations of Access to Knowledge. [Syracuse, N.Y.]Division of Summer Sessions, Syracuse University. 153--163.score: 120.0
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  47. Arto Mutanen (2011). Science and Communication. Synthesis Philosophica 25 (2):235-249.score: 120.0
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  48. Solfrid Vatne (2008). Development of Professional Knowledge in Action. Experiences From an Action Science Design Focusing on'Acknowledging Communication'in Mental Health. Encyclopaideia 24:9-29.score: 120.0
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  49. Kenneth M. Sayre (1986). Intentionality and Information Processing: An Alternative Model for Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):121-38.score: 116.0
    This article responds to two unresolved and crucial problems of cognitive science: (1) What is actually accomplished by functions of the nervous system that we ordinarily describe in the intentional idiom? and (2) What makes the information processing involved in these functions semantic? It is argued that, contrary to the assumptions of many cognitive theorists, the computational approach does not provide coherent answers to these problems, and that a more promising start would be to fall back on mathematical (...) theory and, with the help of evolutionary biology and neurophysiology, to attempt a characterization of the adaptive processes involved in visual perception. Visual representations are explained as patterns of cortical activity that are enabled to focus on objects in the changing visual environment by constantly adjusting to maintain levels of mutual information between pattern and object that are adequate for continuing perceptual control. In these terms, the answer proposed to (1) is that the intentional functions of vision are those involved in the establishment and maintenance of such representations, and to (2) that semantic features are added to the information processes of vision with the focus on objects that these representations accomplish. The article concludes with proposals for extending this account of intentionality to the higher domains of conceptualization and reason, and with speculation about how semantic information-processing might be achieved in mechanical systems. (shrink)
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  50. Marianne Benard, Huib de Vriend, Paul van Haperen & Volkert Beekman (2010). Science and Society in Dialogue About Marker Assisted Selection. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (4):317-329.score: 114.0
    Analysis of a European Union funded biotechnology project on plant genomics and marker assisted selection in Solanaceous crops shows that the organization of a dialogue between science and society to accompany technological innovations in plant breeding faces practical challenges. Semi-structured interviews with project participants and a survey among representatives of consumer and other non-governmental organizations show that the professed commitment to dialogue on science and biotechnology is rather shallow and has had limited application for all involved. Ultimately, other (...)
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