Search results for 'Science in popular culture' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Susan Sheets-Pyenson (1985). Popular Science Periodicals in Paris and London: The Emergence of a Low Scientific Culture, 1820–1875. Annals of Science 42 (6):549-572.
    Efforts to diffuse useful knowledge on the part of dedicated social reformers, enterprising publishers, and vigorous voluntary associations created new forms of popular literature in the urban centres of Paris and London during the middle decades of the nineteenth century. Popular science periodicals, especially, embodied the aims of the advocates of cheap literature, by providing ‘improving’ information at prices low enough to reach readers who might otherwise purchase potentially dangerous political tracts. Besides promoting social stability, popular (...)
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  2. Roger Cooter & Stephen Pumfrey (1994). Separate Spheres and Public Places: Reflections on the History of Science Popularization and Science in Popular Culture. History of Science 32 (97):237-267.
     
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  3.  1
    Margrit Shildrick (1998). Deviant Bodies: Critical Perspectives on Science and Difference in Popular Culture Edited by Jennifer Terry and Jacqueline Urla. Body and Society 4 (1):113-115.
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  4.  29
    Mary Faith Marshall (2004). The Placebo Effect in Popular Culture. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):37-42.
    This paper gives an overview of the placebo effect in popular culture, especially as it pertains to the work of authors Patrick O’Brian and Sinclair Lewis. The beloved physician as placebo, and the clinician scientist as villain are themes that respectively inform the novels, The Hundred Days and Arrowsmith. Excerpts from the novels, and from film show how the placebo effect, and the randomized clinical trial, have emerged into popular culture, and evolved over time.
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  5.  23
    Hermann von Helmholtz (1995). Science and Culture: Popular and Philosophical Essays. University of Chicago Press.
    Hermann von Helmholtz was a leading figure of nineteenth-century European intellectual life, remarkable even among the many scientists of the period for the range and depth of his interests. A pioneer of physiology and physics, he was also deeply concerned with the implications of science for philosophy and culture. From the 1850s to the 1890s, Helmholtz delivered more than two dozen popular lectures, seeking to educate the public and to enlighten the leaders of European society and governments (...)
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  6. Jon Turney (1998). Frankenstein's Footsteps: Science, Genetics and Popular Culture. Yale University Press.
     
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  7.  16
    Matthew C. Nisbet & Declan Fahy (2013). Bioethics in Popular Science: Evaluating the Media Impact of The Immortal Llife of Henrietta Lacks on the Biobank Debate. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundThe global expansion of biobanks has led to a range of bioethical concerns related to consent, privacy, control, ownership, and disclosure. As an opportunity to engage broader audiences on these concerns, bioethicists have welcomed the commercial success of Rebecca Skloot’s 2010 bestselling book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. To assess the impact of the book on discussion within the media and popular culture more generally, we systematically analyzed the ethics-related themes emphasized in reviews and articles about the (...)
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  8.  9
    Matthew Nisbet & Declan Fahy (2013). Bioethics in Popular Science: Evaluating the Media Impact of The Immortal Llife of Henrietta Lacks on the Biobank Debate. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):10-.
    Background: The global expansion of biobanks has led to a range of bioethical concerns related to consent, privacy, control, ownership, and disclosure. As an opportunity to engage broader audiences on these concerns, bioethicists have welcomed the commercial success of Rebecca Skloot’s 2010 bestselling book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. To assess the impact of the book on discussion within the media and popular culture more generally, we systematically analyzed the ethics-related themes emphasized in reviews and articles about (...)
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  9. Roger Luckhurst & Josephine McDonagh (eds.) (2002). Transactions and Encounters: Science and Culture in the Nineteenth Century. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by Palgrave.
    Transactions and Encounters examines a diverse range of emerging technologies in the Victorian era. Such topics are explored as the popular craze for microscopes the uncanny possibilities of the telephone the jostling for authority between literature and science, with scenes by and including Dickens and Lewes, Huxley and Gosse the weird imaginary around androgynous barnacles and the competing versions of a mind-reading act. These essays combine to produce an invigorating and involving attempt to re-cast understandings of 19th century (...)
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  10.  43
    Huib J. Zuidervaart (2004). Reflecting ‘Popular Culture’: The Introduction, Diffusion, and Construction of the Reflecting Telescope in the Netherlands. Annals of Science 61 (4):407-452.
    The eighteenth century was an era in which science came to play a major role in the cultural ideal of the city elite. The phenomenon of the ‘gentleman-scientist’ arose: a layman without a scientific education who for a variety of often socially desirable reasons devoted himself to scientific endeavours. Scientific instruments were the tools for this interest. This article describes the introduction, diffusion, and construction in the Netherlands of one of the most prominent eighteenth-century instruments: the reflecting telescope. The (...)
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  11.  3
    Lee Barron (2012). Social Theory in Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Social theory can sometimes seem as though it's speaking of a world that existed long ago, so why should we continue to study and discuss the theories of these dead white men? Can their work still inform us about the way we live today? Are they still relevant to our consumer-focused, celebrity-crazy, tattoo-friendly world? This book explains how the ideas of classical sociological theory can be understood, and applied to, everyday activities like listening to hip-hop, reading fashion magazines or watching (...)
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  12.  3
    Margaret S. Hrezo & John M. Parrish (eds.) (2010). Damned If You Do: Dilemmas of Action in Literature and Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    These essays showcase the value of the narrative arts in investigating complex conflicts of value in moral and political life, and explore the philosophical problem of moral dilemmas as expressed in ancient drama, classic and contemporary ...
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  13.  14
    William Eamon (2000). Alchemy in Popular Culture: Leonardo Fioravanti and the Search for the Philosopher's Stone. Early Science and Medicine 5 (2):196-212.
    This article examines the alchemical ideas and practices of the sixteenth-century Italian surgeon Leonardo Fioravanti.
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  14.  19
    Robert M. Geraci (2011). Martial Bliss: War and Peace in Popular Science Robotics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 24 (3):339-354.
    In considering how to best deploy robotic systems in public and private sectors, we must consider what individuals will expect from the robots with which they interact. Public awareness of robotics—as both military machines and domestic helpers—emerges out of a braided stream composed of science fiction and popular science. These two genres influence news media, government and corporate spending, and public expectations. In the Euro-American West, both science fiction and popular science are ambivalent about (...)
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  15. Alison Winter (1994). Mesmerism and Popular Culture in Early Victorian England. History of Science 32 (97):317-343.
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  16. Robin James (2013). Race and the Feminized Popular in Nietzsche and Beyond. Hypatia 28 (4):749-766.
    I distinguish between the nineteenth- to twentieth-century (modernist) tendency to rehabilitate (white) femininity from the abject popular, and the twentieth- to twenty-first-century (postmodernist) tendency to rehabilitate the popular from abject white femininity. Careful attention to the role of nineteenth-century racial politics in Nietzsche's Gay Science shows that his work uses racial nonwhiteness to counter the supposedly deleterious effects of (white) femininity (passivity, conformity, and so on). This move—using racial nonwhiteness to rescue pop culture from white femininity—is (...)
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  17.  17
    Louise Sundararajan (2015). Indigenous Psychology: Grounding Science in Culture, Why and How? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 45 (1):64-81.
    My agenda is to ground psychological science in culture by using complex rather than overly simple models of culture and using indigenous categories as criteria of a translation test to determine the adequacy of scientific models of culture. I first explore the compatibility between Chinese indigenous categories and complex models of culture, by casting in the theoretical framework of symmetry and symmetry breaking a series of translations performed on Fiske's relational models theory. Next, I show (...)
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  18. Stéphanie Genz (2009). Postfemininities in Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Addressing the contradictions surrounding modern-day femininity and its complicated relationship with feminism and postfeminism, this book examines a range of popular female/feminist icons and paradigms. It offers an innovative and forward-looking perspective on femininity and the modern female self.
     
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  19.  7
    Paul Grobstein (2005). Revisiting Science in Culture: Science as Story Telling and Story Revising. Journal of Research Practice 1 (1):Article M1.
    Both science itself, and the human culture of which it is a part, would benefit from a story of science that encourages wider engagement with and participation in the processes of scientific exploration. Such a story, based on a close analysis of scientific method, is presented here. It is the story of science as story telling and story revising. The story of science as story suggests that science can and should serve three distinctive functions (...)
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  20. Peter Bowler (2006). Experts and Publishers: Writing Popular Science in Early Twentieth-Century Britain, Writing Popular History of Science Now. British Journal for the History of Science 39 (2):159-187.
    The bulk of this address concerns itself with the extent to which professional scientists were involved in popular science writing in early twentieth-century Britain. Contrary to a widespread assumption, it is argued that a significant proportion of the scientific community engaged in writing the more educational type of popular science. Some high-profile figures acquired enough skill in popular writing to exert considerable influence over the public's perception of science and its significance. The address also (...)
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  21. Ishay Landa (2007). The Overman in the Marketplace: Nietzschean Heroism in Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    This book explores the emergence and significance of 'a Nietzschean heroic model' in 20th-century popular culture, some notable examples of which are James Bond, Tarzan, and Hannibal Lecter.
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  22. Ishay Landa (2009). The Overman in the Marketplace: Nietzschean Heroism in Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    This book explores the emergence and significance of 'a Nietzschean heroic model' in 20th-century popular culture, some notable examples of which are James Bond, Tarzan, and Hannibal Lecter.
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  23. Gerald Weissmann (2009). Mortal and Immortal Dna: Science and the Lure of Myth. Bellevue Literary Press.
    Mortal and immortal DNA : Craig Venter and the lure of "lamia" -- Homeopathy : Holmes, hogwarts, and the Prince of Wales -- Citizen Pinel and the madman at Bellevue -- The experimental pathology of stress : Hans Selye to Paris Hilton -- Gore's fever and Dante's Inferno : Chikungunya reaches Ravenna -- Giving things their proper names : Carl Linnaeus and W.H. Auden -- Spinal irritation and fibromyalgia : Lincoln's surgeon general and the three graces -- Tithonus and the (...)
     
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  24. Thomas S. Hibbs (2011). Shows About Nothing: Nihilism in Popular Culture. Baylor University Press.
    Nihilism, American style -- The quest for evil -- The negative zone : suburban familial malaise in American beauty, Revolutionary road, and Mad men -- Normal nihilism as comic : Seinfeld, Trainspotting, and Pulp fiction -- Romanticism and nihilism -- Defense against the dark arts : from Se7en to the Dark knight and Harry Potter -- God got involved : sacred quests and overcoming nihilism -- Feels like the movies.
     
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  25. M. A. Min, Jiang Jin, Wang di, Joseph W. Esherick & L. U. Hanchao (2008). The Symposium on Urban Popular Culture in Modern China. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):499-532.
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  26.  16
    Daniel P. Malloy (2012). Four Recent Works in Philosophy and Popular Culture. Teaching Philosophy 35 (3):293-304.
    Popular culture is ubiquitous. And referencing popular culture can be an excellent pedagogical tool. Used properly, it provides students with easily accessible examples—in some cases examples they have already been interested in. Given these facts, the creation and expansion of the literature on the intersection of popular culture and philosophy is not surprising. The purpose of these volumes has been controversial since their inception, but they do seem ideally suited as introductory texts. This essay (...)
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  27.  52
    Alan Sokal, Letter to Physics Today in Reply to Peter Saulson's Review of My Book Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture.
    Every author has to expect that some reviewers will dislike his book, perhaps intensely. That is par for the course. But one might hope that even a scathingly negative review would be accurate in its summary of the book’s contents and principal arguments. Alas, Peter Saulson’s review1 of my book Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture 2 fails to meet this minimum standard.
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  28.  3
    Tetsuo Kogawa (1985). New Trends in Japanese Popular Culture. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (64):147-152.
    Popular culture’ has two Japanese translations: taishu bunka and minshu bunka. Bunka embraces the entire concept of ‘culture,’ but ‘popular’ isn't so easily translated. Taishu means a large number (tai) of population or groups (shu), while minshu means groups (shu) of ordinary people (min). Thus, minshu bunka is a more faithful translation of 'popular culture’ than taishu bunka. Yet, the expression minshu bunka does not occur as frequently as taishu bunka. This means that, in (...)
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  29.  1
    Robert Haskell (1993). Realpolitik in the Addictions Field: Treatment-Professional, Popular-Culture Ideology, and Scientific Research. Journal of Mind and Behavior 14 (3):257-276.
    The article examines recurrent instances of personal and professional negative sanctions resulting from individual researchers publishing findings considered contrary to the historical and prevailing alcoholism and drug-addiction treatment Zeitgeist. Instances from the published literature along with personal accounts from professionals in the field are presented. It is suggested that these instances indicate a pattern of political and ideological conflicts generated from a treatment-professional and a popular-culture, nonscientifically based belief system on the one hand, versus a research-based system on (...)
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  30.  1
    James F. McGrath, The Desert of the Real: Christianity, Buddhism & Baudrillard in The Matrix Films and Popular Culture.
    The movie The Matrix and its sequels draw explicitly on imagery from a number of sources, including in particular Buddhism, Christianity, and the writings of Jean Baudrillard. A perspective is offered on the perennial philosophical question ‘What is real?’, using language and symbols drawn from three seemingly incompatible world views. In doing so, these movies provide us with an insight into the way popular culture makes eclectic use of various streams of thought to fashion a new reality that (...)
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  31. Sumita S. Chakravarty (2011). Reflections on the Body Beautiful in Indian Popular Culture. Social Research: An International Quarterly 78 (2):395-416.
    In what ways does a society perceive itself as beautiful? Do images of physical perfection indicate aspirations of the social or national body, the perfect body/face emblematic of the collective self-image? In recent years, under conditions of economic and cultural globalization, practices and discourses to render the body beautiful have come under increasing scrutiny. Concerned with the marketing and commodification of body ideals, these studies trace the deleterious effects of advertising, fashion, and celebrity culture in various national and cross-cultural (...)
     
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  32. Ravinder Kumar (1995). Reflections on the Proposal:'A History of Science, Philosophy and Culture in Indian Civilization'. In Surendra Nath Sen (ed.), Science, Philosophy, and Culture in Historical Perspective. Project of History of Indian Science, Philosophy, and Culture 1--152.
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  33. Les Todres (2002). Humanising Forces: Phenomenology in Science; Psychotherapy in Technological Culture. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 2 (1).
    One of the concerns of the existential-phenomenological tradition has been to examine the human implications of living in a world of proliferating technology. The pressure to become more specialised and efficient has become a powerful value and quest. Both contemporary culture and science enables a view of human identity which focuses on our 'parts' and the compartmentalisation of our lives into specialised 'bits'. This is a kind of abstraction which Psychology has also, at times, taken in its concern (...)
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  34. Arnoud Vrolijk (ed.) (2007). O Ye Gentlemen: Arabic Studies on Science and Literary Culture: In Honour of Remke Kruk. Brill.
    O ye Gentlemen explores two permanent and vital strands in Arabic culture: the Greek tradition in science and philosophy and the literary tradition. More than thirty essays demonstrate that the strands freely interweave within the broader scope of Schrifttum.
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  35. Thomas S. Hibbs (1999). Shows About Nothing: Nihilism in Popular Culture From the Exorcist to Seinfeld. Spence Pub..
     
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  36. Lynette Turner (2002). Woman's Share in Primitive Culture: Science, Femininity and Anthropological Knowledge. In Roger Luckhurst & Josephine McDonagh (eds.), Transactions and Encounters: Science and Culture in the Nineteenth Century. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by Palgrave 182--203.
     
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  37.  8
    Ruth Barton (1998). Just Before Nature: The Purposes of Science and the Purposes of Popularization in Some English Popular Science Journals of the 1860s. Annals of Science 55 (1):1-33.
    Summary Popular science journalism flourished in the 1860s in England, with many new journals being projected. The time was ripe, Victorian men of science believed, for an ?organ of science? to provide a means of communication between specialties, and between men of science and the public. New formats were tried as new purposes emerged. Popular science journalism became less recreational and educational. Editorial commentary and reviewing the progress of science became more important. (...)
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  38.  25
    Harvey Wheeler (1999). Francis Bacon's “Verulamium” the Common-Law Template of the Modern in English Science and Culture. Angelaki 4 (1):7 – 26.
    (1999). Francis Bacon's “VERULAMIUM” the common‐law template of the modern in english science and culture. Angelaki: Vol. 4, Judging the law, pp. 7-26.
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  39.  6
    Beata Hoffmann (2013). Scent in Science and Culture. History of the Human Sciences 26 (5):0952695113508120.
    Although we are not aware of many spontaneous sensual experiences, we learn about the surrounding world through our senses. One of the objects of sensual experience is smell. It influences our decisions, shapes social interactions and is also a carrier of social meanings. Unfortunately, long-term conviction about the domination of sight over smell led to a belief in the pictorial character of our contemporary culture. Moreover, constant fluctuations between the promotion and ignoring of olfactory data have played a role (...)
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  40.  4
    W. Clark Gilpin (2002). The Millenarian Turn: Millenarian Contexts of Science, Politics, and Everyday Anglo-American Life in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Vol. 3 of Millenarianism and Messianism in Early Modern European Culture (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (4):549-550.
    W. Clark Gilpin - The Millenarian Turn: Millenarian Contexts of Science, Politics, and Everyday Anglo-American Life in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Vol. 3 of Millenarianism and Messianism in Early Modern European Culture - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:4 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.4 549-550 Book Review The Millenarian Turn: Millenarian Contexts of Science, Politics, and Everyday Anglo-American Life in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries James E. Force and Richard H. Popkin, editors. The (...)
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  41.  2
    Arthur F. McEvoy (1992). Science, Culture, and Politics in U.S. Natural Resources Management. Journal of the History of Biology 25 (3):469 - 486.
    What I have tried to do here is to provide a historical example of the interdependence between nature and culture that is one of the themes of this conference. To sum up: Scientific descriptions of the world emerge out of a complex interaction between nature, economic production, and the legal system. “Science” consists of a struggle among scientists, and between scientists and citizens, over what counts as “reality.” Lawmaking, in turn, consists of a struggle between people who want (...)
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  42.  4
    Jaipreet Virdi (2010). Learning From Artifacts: A Review of the “Reading Artifacts: Summer Institute in the Material Culture of Science,” Presented by The Canada Science and Technology Museum and Situating Science Cluster. [REVIEW] Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):276-279.
    Describing how the study of artifacts is greatly enhanced by an understanding of the history of museums, Ken Arnold remarks that there is “an implicit faith in the power of objects to tell, or at least ask, historians things that the written word alone cannot” (1999, p. 145). Rather than remaining mute objects or passive accessories to textual descriptions, artifacts (and the museums that house them) are tangible incarnations of the culture from which they emerged, providing unique information on (...)
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  43. David Knight (2002). Raw Material: Producing Pathology in Victorian Culture. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:137-138.
    Readers expecting a history of nineteenth‐century pathology are in for a surprise. They will find instead a self‐conscious example of cultural studies, critical of some assumptions made in this field and of some feminist writing, but containing some alarming sentences like “My goal has been to give shape to the accidental palimpsests of an inveterately verbal, and increasingly visual, culture; to assemble a particular series of hermeneutic loose ends into a coherent account of how an extraordinarily bizarre system of (...)
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  44.  17
    Diana Senechal (2011). Republic of Noise: The Loss of Solitude in Schools and Culture. R&L Education.
    Machine generated contents note: Chapter 1 Acknowledgments -- Chapter 2 Introduction: The Chatter of the Present -- Chapter 3 Definitions of Solitude -- Chapter 4 Distraction: The Flip Side of Engagement -- Chapter 5 Antigone: Literature as "Thinking Apart" -- Chapter 6 The Workshop Model in New York City -- Chapter 7 The Folly of the "Big Idea" -- Chapter 8 The Cult of Success -- Chapter 9 Mass Personalization and the "Underground Man" -- Chapter 10 The Need for Loneliness (...)
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  45. Alexander Riley (2010). Impure Play: Sacredness, Transgression, and the Tragic in Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    This is a cultural sociology of some controversial aspects of contemporary popular culture. The book rereads disparaged and vilified cultural objects ranging from gangsta rap and death metal to violent video games, using cultural theories on transgression, the sacred, and the tragic as the interpretive lens.
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  46. Alexander Riley (2012). Impure Play: Sacredness, Transgression, and the Tragic in Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    This is a cultural sociology of some controversial aspects of contemporary popular culture. The book rereads disparaged and vilified cultural objects ranging from gangsta rap and death metal to violent video games, using cultural theories on transgression, the sacred, and the tragic as the interpretive lens.
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  47.  5
    Dimitri Bayuk (2002). Literature, Music, and Science in Nineteenth Century Russian Culture: Prince Odoyevskiy’s Quest for a Natural Enharmonic Scale. Science in Context 15 (2).
    Known today mostly as an author of Romantic short stories and fairy tales for children, Prince Vladimir Odoyevskiy was a distinguished thinker of his time, philosopher and bibliophile. The scope of his interests includes also history of magic arts and alchemy, German Romanticism, Church music. An attempt to understand the peculiarity of eight specific modes used in chants of Russian Orthodox Church led him to his own musical theory based upon well-known writings by Zarlino, Leibniz, Euler, Prony. He realized his (...)
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  48.  3
    David Gentilcore (1994). Galileo Courtier: The Practice of Science in the Culture of Absolutism: Mario Biagioli,(Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1993). Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (5):809-816.
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  49.  11
    David Gentilcore (1994). Galileo Courtier: The Practice of Science in the Culture of Absolutism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (5):809-816.
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  50.  19
    Varadaraja V. Raman (2014). Food: Its Many Aspects in Science, Religion, and Culture. Zygon 49 (4):958-976.
    Food is a sine qua non for life on Earth. It has more significance than nutrition and sustenance, more variety than many aspects of human culture. Food has religious as well as historical dimensions. The complexity of the food chain and of the related ecological balance is one of the wonders of the biological world. In the human context, food has found countless expressions and regional richness. Food has provoked feasts, as its lack and maldistribution have caused famines. While (...)
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