Search results for 'Science news' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. M. Ringle (1992). Cognitive Science News Editorial Staff Changes. Cognitive Science 16 (1).score: 156.0
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  2. D. Waltz (1985). Cognitive Science News. Cognitive Science 9 (4).score: 156.0
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  3. William Allen (2001). A News Media Perspective on Environmental Communication The Culture of Newsrooms and the Culture of Science Differ Considerably, but by Understanding These Differences, Biologists Can Make Communicating Science News to the Public Efficient, Enjoyable, and Productive. BioScience 51 (4):289-291.score: 150.0
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  4. Elia T. Ben-Ari (1998). Making Science News: Public Affairs Practitioners Can Serve as a Vital Link Between Scientists and the Public. BioScience 48 (11):893-898.score: 150.0
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  5. Sonya Senkowsky (2004). Arctic Science News. BioScience 54 (11):1056.score: 150.0
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  6. Gobind Behari Lal (1945). Popularization of Science Through News. Philosophy of Science 12 (2):41-44.score: 126.0
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  7. There'S. More, - Cognitive Science - General Index by Topic to Ai in the News.score: 126.0
    October 14, 2007: Studying how a broker's brain works. swissinfo. "To help maintain its competitive edge, the Swiss banking industry is investing heavily in financial engineering. Its latest recruit is economist Peter Bossaerts. swissinfo talked to Bossaerts, a leading expert in neuroeconomics – the study of how we make financial choices - about his recent appointment as professor at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne. ... swissinfo: So what exactly is neuroeconomics? Peter Bossaerts: It's a mixture of (...)
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  8. Melissa R. Kachan, Sandra M. Guilbert & Gay L. Bisanz (2006). Do Teachers Ask Students to Read News in Secondary Science?: Evidence From the Canadian Context. Science Education 90 (3):496-521.score: 126.0
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  9. Bruno Latour (2003). Do You Believe in Reality?" News From the Trenches of the Science Wars. In Robert C. Scharff & Val Dusek (eds.), Philosophy of Technology: The Technological Condition: An Anthology. Blackwell Publishers. 126--137.score: 120.0
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  10. Anna Maria Gillis (1996). The Hunt for News The New Science Journalists Ted Anton Rick McCourt. BioScience 46 (1):59-60.score: 120.0
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  11. Jodi F. Kolber (1998). AIBS News Congressional Fellowship Program Bridges the Gap Between Science and Policy. BioScience 48 (11):966-967.score: 120.0
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  12. Ed Rykiel (1997). Society News: Ecosystem Science for the Twenty-First Century. BioScience 47 (10):705-707.score: 120.0
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  13. Robin B. Hodess (1997). The Role of News Media in European Integration: A Framework of Analysis for Political Science. Res Publica 39 (2).score: 120.0
     
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  14. Andrew C. Revkin (2007). Climate Change as News: Challenges in Communicating Environmental Science. In Joseph F. DiMento & Pamela Doughman (eds.), Climate Change: What It Means for Us, Our Children, and Our Grandchildren. The Mit Press. 139--60.score: 120.0
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  15. Tim Seastedt (1996). Society News: Ecosystem Science and Society. BioScience 46 (5):370-372.score: 120.0
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  16. J. S. Weis (1989). Washington Watch: News on Science Education. BioScience 39 (11):763-763.score: 120.0
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  17. Carol L. Rogers (2000). Making the Audience a Key Participant in the Science Communication Process. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):553-557.score: 102.0
    The public communication of science and technology has become increasingly important over the last several decades. However, understanding the audience that receives this information remains the weak link in the science communication process. This essay provides a brief review of some of the issues involved, discusses results from an audience-based study, and suggests some strategies that both scientists and journalists can use to modify media coverage in ways that can help audiences better understand major public issues that involve (...)
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  18. Alan Irwin & Brian Wynne (eds.) (1996). Misunderstanding Science?: The Public Reconstruction of Science and Technology. Cambridge University Press.score: 96.0
    Misunderstanding Science? offers a challenging new perspective on the public understanding of science. In so doing, it also challenges existing ideas of the nature of science and its relationships with society. Its analysis and case presentation are highly relevant to current concerns over the uptake, authority, and effectiveness of science as expressed, for example, in areas such as education, medical/health practice, risk and the environment, technological innovation. Based on several in-depth case-studies, and informed theoretically by the (...)
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  19. Richard Dawkins (1998). Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, Delusion, and the Appetite for Wonder. Houghton Mifflin.score: 96.0
    Did Newton "unweave the rainbow" by reducing it to its prismatic colors, as Keats contended? Did he, in other words, diminish beauty? Far from it, says Dawkins--Newton's unweaving is the key too much of modern astronomy and to the breathtaking poetry of modern cosmology. Mysteries don't lose their poetry because they are solved: the solution often is more beautiful than the puzzle, uncovering deeper mystery. (The Keats who spoke of "unweaving the rainbow" was a very young man, Dawkins reminds us.) (...)
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  20. Bernard Dixon (1989). Society and Science: Changing the Way We Live. Distributed by Sterling Pub. Co..score: 90.0
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  21. John L. Farrands (1993). Don't Panic, Panic!: [The Use and Abuse of Science to Create Fear]. Text Pub. Co..score: 90.0
     
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  22. Robert M. Geraci (2011). Martial Bliss: War and Peace in Popular Science Robotics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 24 (3):339-354.score: 66.0
    In considering how to best deploy robotic systems in public and private sectors, we must consider what individuals will expect from the robots with which they interact. Public awareness of robotics—as both military machines and domestic helpers—emerges out of a braided stream composed of science fiction and popular science. These two genres influence news media, government and corporate spending, and public expectations. In the Euro-American West, both science fiction and popular science are ambivalent about the (...)
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  23. Alan D. Sokal (2008). Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    In 1996, Alan Sokal, a Professor of Physics at New York University, wrote a paper for the cultural-studies journal Social Text, entitled: 'Transgressing the Boundaries: Towards a transformative hermeneutics of quantum gravity'. It was reviewed, accepted and published. Sokal immediately confessed that the whole article was a hoax - a cunningly worded paper designed to expose and parody the style of extreme postmodernist criticism of science. The story became front-page news around the world and triggered fierce and wide-ranging (...)
     
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  24. C. W. Churchman (2004). Philosophy of Science. Philosophy of Science 61 (2):214-216.score: 60.0
    Eview This Encyclopedia would be a useful guide to this growing area of philosophy. - Library Journal Thoughtful, concise essays that are both well structured and ordered... Larger schools with advanced courses of study in philosophy and/or bioethics will find this an extremely valuable addition to their collection. Highly recommended. -Choice Contributors from many countries provide a reference to developments in the philosophy of science since the beginning of the 20th century, that is, themes that have emerged starting with (...)
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  25. Peter B. Lloyd, Discussion of Amit Goswami's Science Within Consciousness.score: 54.0
    Amit Goswami published his book, "The Self-Aware Universe: How Consciousness Creates the Material World", in 1993. In 1996, he and Henry Swift started up the online newsletter Science Within Consciousness, which carries articles and news features connected with the Goswamian philosophy. Below, I comment on Goswami's metaphysical theories as represented in his writings in the SWC newsletter, especially in his pieces: Monistic Idealism May Provide Better Ontology for Cognitive Science: A Reply to Dyer (undated, circa (...)
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  26. J. D. Smith (2011). Dowsing and Science: Essays. Texas Review Press.score: 54.0
    Defining terms -- The real world -- The news -- Reading as vacation -- Uses of culture -- The postmodern smirk -- The corporate gallery -- Icons and idols -- Man as Romanian -- Dowsing and science -- Origin myths -- Diplomatic memoir -- A syndrome of simile and metaphor -- Three dreams, one trip -- My obituaries -- Salt water -- My coronation -- Representations -- The pornographic dream -- Against art fairs -- Rescuing the subject from (...)
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  27. Toby A. Ten Eyck (2002). Food Irradiation in the News: The Cultural Clash of a Postharvest Technology. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 19 (1):53-61.score: 48.0
    Food irradiation has been acommercially viable postharvest technology fornearly 50 years (the actual idea of usingionizing radiation to extend the shelf-life offoods is over a century old), yet it has beenused only occasionally and sporadically.Interviews with reporters and the sources theyused at a Louisiana newspaper and a Floridanewspaper uncovered three cultural spherespresent in the debate over this post harvesttechnology – food, science/technology, andjournalism. Each of these spheres were pointsof contention for reporters and sources, andthis has had an affect on (...)
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  28. Samuel L. Popkin (2007). Changing Media and Changing Political Organization: Delegation, Representation and News. Japanese Journal of Political Science 8 (1):71-93.score: 42.0
    This article examines the ways that new communications technologies change the organization of politics as well as the content of news. Changes in the media lead to changes in the mediators, the persons who choose and interpret the news for the public. When new mediators convey different news stories or offer different interpretations from the previous regime, they redistribute control of politics and culture.
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  29. James T. Hamilton (2007). News That Sells: Media Competition and News Content. Japanese Journal of Political Science 8 (1):7-42.score: 42.0
    This paper explores the economic factors that influence news coverage and discusses the difficulties of determining the impact of news content on political outcomes. Evidence from the United States clearly shows how supply and demand concepts can be used to predict content in newspapers, television, and the Internet. To demonstrate how the concept of market-driven news extends beyond the US, I trace out hypotheses about how media content in many countries should vary depending on three factors in (...)
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  30. Matthew A. Baum (2007). Soft News and Foreign Policy: How Expanding the Audience Changes the Policies. Japanese Journal of Political Science 8 (1):115-145.score: 42.0
    Since the 1980s, the mass media have changed the way they cover major political stories, like foreign policy crises. As a consequence, what the public learns about these events has changed. More media outlets cover major events than in the past, including the entertainment-oriented soft news media. When they do cover a political story, soft news outlets focus more on than traditional news media and less on the political or strategic context, or substantive nuances, of policy debates. (...)
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  31. Christian Collet & Gento Kato (2014). Does NHK Make You Smarter (and Super News Make You 'Softer')? An Examination of Japanese Political Knowledge and the Potential Influence of TV News. Japanese Journal of Political Science 15 (1):23-50.score: 42.0
    A fundamental component of liberal democracy has only recently been examined in Japan; rarer still are assessments of the impact of media consumption on political awareness. In this paper, we utilize two recent sources to address two related questions: (1) what factors influence Japanese political knowledge? and (2) is the changing media environment in Japan having an influence on what citizens know about political affairs? With regard to the first question, we find, in line with previous studies in the US (...)
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  32. David M. Potter & Douglas van Belle (2004). News Media Coverage Influence on Japan's Foreign Aid Allocations. Japanese Journal of Political Science 5 (1):113-135.score: 42.0
    This study explores the role that news coverage plays in the allocation of Japanese development aid. Conceptually, it is expected that democratic foreign policy officials, including those working in bureaucratic governmental structures will try to match the magnitude of their actions with what they expect is the public's perception of the importance of the recipient. News media salience serves an easily accessible indicator of that domestic political importance and, in the case of foreign aid, this suggests that higher (...)
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  33. Cheryl Lyn Dybas (2001). News From the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Ecological Genomics: The Genome Revolution Comes to the Oceans Aquatic Sciences Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico 12–16 February 2001. [REVIEW] BioScience 51 (4):313-316.score: 40.0
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  34. C. Kaplan (2010). Film Review: Films Media Group, Films for the Humanities and Sciences, Medical Ethics and Issues Anthology: The News Hour with Jim Lehrer, Cambridge Educational: Princeton, New Jersey, 2007, 179 Minutes: 9781421367866, US$299.95 (3-DVD Set). [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 17 (3):413-415.score: 40.0
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  35. Christine James (2005). Sonar Technology and Shifts in Environmental Ethics. Essays in Philosophy 6 (1).score: 36.0
    The history of sonar technology provides a fascinating case study for philosophers of science. During the first and second World Wars, sonar technology was primarily associated with activity on the part of the sonar technicians and researchers. Usually this activity is concerned with creation of sound waves under water, as in the classic “ping and echo”. The last fifteen years have seen a shift toward passive, ambient noise “acoustic daylight imaging” sonar. Along with this shift a new relationship has (...)
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  36. John G. Cramer, News From CyberSpace: VR and Hypertext.score: 36.0
    I live in Seattle, the city which last Fall was host to two major international conferences of interest to science fiction readers: The Annual International IEEE Symposium on Virtual Reality (VRAIS- 93) and The 5th ACM Conference on Hypertext (Hypertext-93). I was able to attend both conferences, and I'll use this column to provide an overview of what I learned there.
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  37. Malcolm R. Forster (1999). How Do Simple Rules `Fit to Reality' in a Complex World? Minds and Machines 9 (4):543-564.score: 36.0
    The theory of fast and frugal heuristics, developed in a new book called Simple Heuristics that make Us Smart (Gigerenzer, Todd, and the ABC Research Group, in press), includes two requirements for rational decision making. One is that decision rules are bounded in their rationality –- that rules are frugal in what they take into account, and therefore fast in their operation. The second is that the rules are ecologically adapted to the environment, which means that they `fit to reality.' (...)
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  38. Paolo Legrenzi & Carlo Umilta (2011). Neuromania: On the Limits of Brain Science. OUP Oxford.score: 36.0
    Neuroeconomics, neuromarketing, neuroaesthetics, and neurotheology are just a few of the novel disciplines that have been inspired by a combination of ancient knowledge together with recent discoveries about how the human brain works. The mass media are full of news items featuring colour photos of the brain, that show us the precise location in which a certain thought or emotion, or even love occurs, hence leading us to believe that we can directly observe, with no mediation, the brain at (...)
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  39. Antonio López Peláez & José Antonio Díaz (2007). Science, Technology and Democracy: Perspectives About the Complex Relation Between the Scientific Community, the Scientific Journalist and Public Opinion. Social Epistemology 21 (1):55 – 68.score: 36.0
    Scientific-technological innovation (particularly in the field of transgenic foods and cloning), scientific journalism and public opinion all share a complex relationship. The rupture of internal consensus among the scientific community, the role played by scientific journalists as "mediators" and the differentiation between what can be referred to as the "informed public" or "epistemological leaders" and the rest of the population were the starting point for our research on the impact of news related to biotechnological advances. In this paper we (...)
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  40. Robert Davis (2011). A Computer-Aided Affective Content Analysis of Nanotechnology Newspaper Articles. NanoEthics 5 (3):319-334.score: 36.0
    This paper explores the application of an affective content analysis to a selection of nanotechnology news articles gathered from selected newspapers. Thematic content analyses dominate current efforts to mine large text collections of popular science media; the addition of an affective analysis element can yield useful information to supplement future content analysis efforts. Using Whissell’s Dictionary of Affect in Language , the analysis rates news articles gathered over a twenty-two year period for their pleasantness, activeness, and imagery, (...)
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  41. Matthew C. Nisbet & Declan Fahy (2013). Bioethics in Popular Science: Evaluating the Media Impact of The Immortal Llife of Henrietta Lacks on the Biobank Debate. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):1-9.score: 36.0
    BackgroundThe global expansion of biobanks has led to a range of bioethical concerns related to consent, privacy, control, ownership, and disclosure. As an opportunity to engage broader audiences on these concerns, bioethicists have welcomed the commercial success of Rebecca Skloot’s 2010 bestselling book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. To assess the impact of the book on discussion within the media and popular culture more generally, we systematically analyzed the ethics-related themes emphasized in reviews and articles about the book, and (...)
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  42. Tim Groseclose & Jeffrey Milyo (2005). A Social‐Science Perspective on Media Bias. Critical Review 17 (3-4):305-314.score: 36.0
    Abstract The questions of whether the news media are biased, and if so, in what direction, typically generate more heat than light. Here, we review some of the most recent and meritorious empirical studies on media bias. This evidence suggests that several prominent national news outlets have a distinct slant to the left or right, and that exposure to these sources influences both public opinion and voting behavior.
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  43. C. West Churchman (1951). News and Notices. Philosophy of Science 18 (4):369.score: 36.0
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  44. Mark C. Hollstein (2005). Matthew A. Baum, Soft News Goes To War, Princeton University Press, 2003, 343 Pp., $49.95, ISBN 0-691-11586–9. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Political Science 6 (3):443-444.score: 36.0
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  45. Subhash C. Lakhotia (2009). Nature of Methods in Science: Technology Driven Science Versus Science Driven Technology. Bioessays: News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology 31 (12):1370-1371.score: 36.0
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  46. Matthew Nisbet & Declan Fahy (2013). Bioethics in Popular Science: Evaluating the Media Impact of The Immortal Llife of Henrietta Lacks on the Biobank Debate. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):10-.score: 36.0
    Background: The global expansion of biobanks has led to a range of bioethical concerns related to consent, privacy, control, ownership, and disclosure. As an opportunity to engage broader audiences on these concerns, bioethicists have welcomed the commercial success of Rebecca Skloot’s 2010 bestselling book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. To assess the impact of the book on discussion within the media and popular culture more generally, we systematically analyzed the ethics-related themes emphasized in reviews and articles about the book, (...)
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  47. Thomas Broman (2013). Criticism and the Circulation of News: The Scholarly Press in the Late Seventeenth Century. History of Science 51 (2):125-150.score: 36.0
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  48. Clifford G. Christians & P. Mark Fackler (1994). Good News: Social Ethics and the Press. OUP USA.score: 36.0
    Mass media ethics and the classical liberal ideal of the autonomous individual are historically linked and professionally dominant--yet the authors of this work feel this is intrisically flawed. They show how recent research in philosophy and social science--together with a longer tradition in theological inquiry--insist that community, mutuality, and relationship are fundamental to a full concept of personhood. The authors argue that "persons-in-community" provides a more defensible grounding for journalists' professional moral decison-making in crucial areas such as truthtelling, privacy, (...)
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  49. Michael Fowler (2003). News: Galileo and Einstein: Using History to Teach Basic Physics to Nonscientists. Science and Education 12 (2):229-231.score: 36.0
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  50. Ken'ichi Ikeda (2001). Ellis S. Krauss Broadcasting Politics in Japan: NHK and Television News, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2000. Japanese Journal of Political Science 2 (2):257-271.score: 36.0
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