Search results for 'Science, Medieval Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ernest A. Moody (1975). Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Science, and Logic: Collected Papers, 1933-1969. University of California Press.score: 145.0
    William of Auvergne and His Treatise De Anima I. Introduction William of Auvergne, Bishop of Paris from until his death in, is of interest to us chiefly ...
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  2. Anneliese Maier (1982). On the Threshold of Exact Science: Selected Writings of Anneliese Maier on Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. University of Pennsylvania Press.score: 144.0
    The nature of motion -- Causes, forces, and resistance -- The concept of the function in fourteenth-century physics -- The significance of the theory of impetus for Scholastic natural philosophy -- Galileo and the Scholastic theory of impetus -- The theory of the elements and the problem of their participation in compounds -- The achievements of late Scholastic natural philosophy.
     
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  3. John Emery Murdoch & Edith Dudley Sylla (eds.) (1975). The Cultural Context of Medieval Learning: Proceedings of the First International Colloquium on Philosophy, Science, and Theology in the Middle Ages--September 1973. D. Reidel Pub. Co..score: 139.0
    JOHN E. MURDOCH AND EDITH DUDLEY SYLLA INTRODUCTION Conferences and colloquia are held and their results often published, but very rarely is any account ...
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  4. John N. Deely (2010). Medieval Philosophy Redefined: The Development of Cenoscopic Science, Ad 354 to 1644 (From the Birth of Augustine to the Death of Poinsot). [REVIEW] University of Scranton Press.score: 125.0
    Medieval philosophy redefined: the Latin age, c. 400-1635 -- The geography of the Latin age -- The fading light of antiquity: Neoplatonism and the tree of Porphyry, c. 3rd-5th cent. AD -- Founding fathers of the Latin Age: Augustine ([d.] 430) and Boethius ([d.] c. 525) -- The five centuries of darkness, c. 525-1025 -- Dawning of the main development : Anselm ([d.] 1109), Abaelard ([d.] 1142), Lombard ([d.] 1160) -- Enter Aristotle, c. 1150 -- Albert ([d.] 1280) (...)
     
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  5. Simo Knuuttila, Reijo Työrinoja & Sten Ebbesen (eds.) (1900). Knowledge and the Sciences in Medieval Philosophy: Proceedings of the Eighth International Congress of Medieval Philosophy (S.I.E.P.M.). [REVIEW] [S.N.].score: 115.0
  6. Ralph Lerner (1963/1972). Medieval Political Philosophy: A Sourcebook. Ithaca, N.Y.,Cornell University Press.score: 102.0
    For students of political philosophy, the history of religion, and medieval civilization, this book provides a rich storehouse of medieval thought drawn from Latin, Hebrew, and Arabic sources.
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  7. Edward Grant (2010). The Nature of Natural Philosophy in the Late Middle Ages. Catholic University of America Press.score: 96.0
    When did modern science begin? -- Science and the medieval university -- The condemnation of 1277, God's absolute power, and physical thought in the late Middle Ages -- God, science, and natural philosophy in the late Middle Ages -- Medieval departures from Aristotelian natural philosophy -- God and the medieval cosmos -- Scientific imagination in the Middle Ages -- Medieval natural philosophy : empiricism without observation -- Science and theology in the Middle Ages (...)
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  8. Ruth Glasner (2009). Averroes' Physics: A Turning Point in Medieval Natural Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 94.0
    Ruth Glasner presents an illuminating reappraisal of Averroes' physics.
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  9. Cary J. Nederman (1997). Medieval Aristotelianism and its Limits: Classical Traditions in Moral and Political Philosophy, 12th-15th Centuries. Variorum.score: 94.0
  10. Jack Zupco (1997). What is the Science of the Soul? A Case Study in the Evolution of Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Synthese 110 (2):297-334.score: 93.0
    This paper aims at a partial rehabilitation of E. A. Moody''s characterization of the 14th century as an age of rising empiricism, specifically by contrasting the conception of the natural science of psychology found in the writings of a prominent 13th-century philosopher (Thomas Aquinas) with those of two 14th-century philosophers (John Buridan and Nicole Oresme). What emerges is that if the meaning of empiricism can be disengaged from modern and contemporary paradigms, and understood more broadly in terms of a cluster (...)
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  11. Jack Zupko (1997). What Is the Science of the Soul? A Case Study in the Evolution of Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Synthese 110 (2):297 - 334.score: 93.0
    This paper aims at a partial rehabilitation of E. A. Moody's characterization of the 14th century as an age of rising empiricism, specifically by contrasting the conception of the natural science of psychology found in the writings of a prominent 13th-century philosopher (Thomas Aquinas) with those of two 14th-century philosophers (John Buridan and Nicole Oresme). What emerges is that if the meaning of empiricism can be disengaged from modern and contemporary paradigms, and understood more broadly in terms of a (...)
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  12. Arthur Stephen McGrade, John Kilcullen & M. S. Kempshall (eds.) (2001). Ethics and Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 92.0
    The eagerly-awaited second volume of The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts will allow scholars and students access for the first time in English to major texts in ethics and political thought from one of the most fruitful periods of speculation and analysis in the history of western thought. Beginning with Albert the Great, who introduced the Latin west to the challenging moral philosophy and natural science of Aristotle, and concluding with the first substantial presentation in English of (...)
     
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  13. Kadish Seth Avi (2003). The Medieval Hebrew Encyclopedias of Science and Philosophy: Proceedings of the Bar-Ilan University Conference. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (2).score: 90.0
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  14. Janet Coleman (1977). Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Science and Logic: Collected Papers by Ernest A. Moody. History of Science 15:67-72.score: 90.0
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  15. Joshua Parens & Joseph C. Macfarland (eds.) (2011). Medieval Political Philosophy: A Sourcebook. Cornell University Press.score: 90.0
     
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  16. Charles B. Schmitt (1976). Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Science, and Logic. International Studies in Philosophy 8:227-228.score: 90.0
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  17. Seth Kadish (2003). The Medieval Hebrew Encyclopedias of Science and Philosophy: Proceedings of the Bar-Ilan University Conference (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (2):269-270.score: 90.0
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  18. Till Grüne-Yanoff (2014). Teaching Philosophy of Science to Scientists: Why, What and How. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 4 (1):115-134.score: 88.0
    This paper provides arguments to philosophers, scientists, administrators and students for why science students should be instructed in a mandatory, custom-designed, interdisciplinary course in the philosophy of science. The argument begins by diagnosing that most science students are taught only conventional methodology: a fixed set of methods whose justification is rarely addressed. It proceeds by identifying seven benefits that scientists incur from going beyond these conventions and from acquiring abilities to analyse and evaluate justifications of scientific methods. It concludes (...)
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  19. J. A. Weisheipl (1985). Book Reviews : Prelude to Galileo--Essays on Medieval and Sixteenth-Century Sources of Galileo's Thought. BY WILLIAM A. WALLACE. (Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Volume 62.) Dordrecht/Boston/London: D. Reidel Publishing Company, 1981. Pp. Xvi + 369. Cloth US $49.95, Paper $23.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 15 (1):97-101.score: 87.0
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  20. Anthony J. Lisska (1977). Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Science, and Logic. International Philosophical Quarterly 17 (3):347-350.score: 87.0
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  21. Jon McGinnis (ed.) (2004). Interpreting Avicenna: Science and Philosophy in Medieval Islam: Proceedings of the Second Conference of the Avicenna Study Group. Brill.score: 87.0
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  22. Shlomo Pines (1986). Studies in Arabic Versions of Greek Texts and in Mediaeval Science. E.J. Brill.score: 87.0
  23. Rein Vihalemm & Peeter Müürsepp (2007). Philosophy of Science in Estonia. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 38 (1):167 - 191.score: 86.0
    This paper presents a survey of the philosophy of science in Estonia. Topics covered include the historical background (science at the 17th century Academia Gustaviana, in the 19th century, during the Soviet period) and an overview of the current situation and main areas of research (the problem of demarcation, a critique of the traditional understandings of science, φ-science, classical and non-classical science, the philosophy of chemistry, the problem of induction, the sociology of scientific knowledge, semiotics as a methodology).
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  24. Philip Mirowski (2004). The Scientific Dimensions of Social Knowledge and Their Distant Echoes in 20th-Century American Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):283-326.score: 84.7
    The widespread impression that recent philosophy of science has pioneered exploration of the “social dimensions of scientific knowledge‘ is shown to be in error, partly due to a lack of appreciation of historical precedent, and partly due to a misunderstanding of how the social sciences and philosophy have been intertwined over the last century. This paper argues that the referents of “democracy‘ are an important key in the American context, and that orthodoxies in the philosophy of science (...)
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  25. Thomas Mormann (2013). Topology as an Issue for History of Philosophy of Science. In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao J. Gonzalez, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer. 423--434.score: 84.0
    Since antiquity well into the beginnings of the 20th century geometry was a central topic for philosophy. Since then, however, most philosophers of science, if they took notice of topology at all, considered it as an abstruse subdiscipline of mathematics lacking philosophical interest. Here it is argued that this neglect of topology by philosophy may be conceived of as the sign of a conceptual sea-change in philosophy of science that expelled geometry, and, more generally, mathematics, from the (...)
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  26. Paul Hoyningen-Huene (1993). Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of Science. University of Chicago Press.score: 84.0
    Few philosophers of science have influenced as many readers as Thomas S. Kuhn. Yet no comprehensive study of his ideas has existed--until now. In this volume, Paul Hoyningen-Huene examines Kuhn's work over four decades, from the days before The Structure of Scientific Revolutions to the present, and puts Kuhn's philosophical development in a historical framework. Scholars from disciplines as diverse as political science and art history have offered widely differing interpretations of Kuhn's ideas, appropriating his notions of paradigm shifts and (...)
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  27. Nicholas Maxwell (2002). The Need for a Revolution in the Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (2):381-408.score: 84.0
    There is a need to bring about a revolution in the philosophy of science, interpreted to be both the academic discipline, and the official view of the aims and methods of science upheld by the scientific community. At present both are dominated by the view that in science theories are chosen on the basis of empirical considerations alone, nothing being permanently accepted as a part of scientific knowledge independently of evidence. Biasing choice of theory in the direction of simplicity, (...)
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  28. Stathis Psillos (2012). What is General Philosophy of Science? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):93-103.score: 84.0
    The very idea of a general philosophy of science relies on the assumption that there is this thing called science—as opposed to the various individual sciences. In this programmatic piece I make a case for the claim that general philosophy of science is the philosophy of science in general or science as such. Part of my narrative makes use of history, for two reasons. First, general philosophy of science is itself characterised by an intellectual tradition which (...)
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  29. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 84.0
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and (...)
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  30. Ernan McMullin (1984). On the Threshold of Exact Science: Selected Writings of Anneliese Maier on Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (3):368-371.score: 84.0
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  31. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1993). Philosophy of Science in Finland: 1970–1990. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 24 (1):147 - 167.score: 84.0
    This paper gives a survey of the philosophy of science in Finland during the two decades 1970-90. Topics covered include the background (earlier studies by Eino Kaila, G. H. von Wright, and Jaakko Hintikka), the main areas of research (inductive logic, probability, truthlikeness, scientific theory, theory change, scientific realism, explanation and action, foundations of special disciplines), and the cultural impact of science studies.
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  32. Dimitri Ginev (1992). Varianten der Kritischen WissenschaftstheorieVariants of Critical Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 23 (1):45-60.score: 84.0
    It is the purpose of this paper to represent an analysis of four variants of critical philosophy of science: the constructivistic methodology, the reflexion upon science from the viewpoint of the critical theory of society, the ‘social natural science’ as a further development of the finalization conception, and the projective philosophy of science. Special attention is paid to the comparison of these variants. Some points of convergence as well as of divergence among them are revealed. A common shortcoming (...)
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  33. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). Answers for Aristotle: How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to A More Meaningful Life. Basic Books.score: 84.0
    How should we live? According to philosopher and biologist Massimo Pigliucci, the greatest guidance to this essential question lies in combining the wisdom of 24 centuries of philosophy with the latest research from 21st century science. In Answers for Aristotle, Pigliucci argues that the combination of science and philosophy first pioneered by Aristotle offers us the best possible tool for understanding the world and ourselves. As Aristotle knew, each mode of thought has the power to clarify the other: (...)
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  34. Joachim Stolz (1996). Bericht: 10th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science (August 19–25, 1995; Florence, Italy). [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 27 (1):167-170.score: 84.0
    The International Union of History and Philosophy of Science organizing the 10th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science is at its cross-road: the alternative is mass-performance or creative exchange of ideas. The program is criticized because the thematic center in History and Philosophy of Science has been shifted too far into the realm of micro-fields of Logic and the time reduction for presentation and discussion of papers to 20 minutes should be reconsidered. Several outstanding (...)
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  35. Gabriella Ujlaki (1994). Philosophy of Science in Hungary. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 25 (1):157 - 175.score: 84.0
    The report gives a survey of the Hungarian philosophy of science after 1973. The report throws some light on the history of Hungarian philosophy in the context of the political circumstances of the late sixties and seventies. It starts with the not so well-known history of 'persecution of philosophers' in 1973. Then it treats the emergence of the philosophy of science focussing on the most significant representatives of this branch of philosophy, which was up to that (...)
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  36. Massimo Pigliucci (2013). When Science Studies Religion: Six Philosophy Lessons for Science Classes. Science and Education 22 (1):49-67.score: 81.0
    It is an unfortunate fact of academic life that there is a sharp divide between science and philosophy, with scientists often being openly dismissive of philosophy, and philosophers being equally contemptuous of the naivete ́ of scientists when it comes to the philosophical underpinnings of their own discipline. In this paper I explore the possibility of reducing the distance between the two sides by introducing science students to some interesting philosophical aspects of research in evolutionary biology, using biological (...)
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  37. Paul Thagard (2009). Why Cognitive Science Needs Philosophy and Vice Versa. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):237-254.score: 81.0
    Contrary to common views that philosophy is extraneous to cognitive science, this paper argues that philosophy has a crucial role to play in cognitive science with respect to generality and normativity. General questions include the nature of theories and explanations, the role of computer simulation in cognitive theorizing, and the relations among the different fields of cognitive science. Normative questions include whether human thinking should be Bayesian, whether decision making should maximize expected utility, and how norms should be (...)
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  38. Peter Byrne (1993). C. Schwöbel and C. Gunton. Eds. Persons, Divine and Human. Pp. 165. (Edinburgh: T. And T. Clark, 1992.) £16.95.R. M. Hare. Essays on Religion and Education. Pp. 238. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992.) £27.50B. B. Price. Medieval Thought: An Introduction. Pp. 261. (Oxford: Blackwell, 1992.) £40 Hdbk, £11.95 Pbk.H. Margenau and R. A. Varghese, Eds. Cosmos, Bios, Theos: Scientists Reflect on Science, God and the Origins of the Universe, Life and Homo Sapiens. Pp. 285. (La Salle: Open Court, 1992.) $38.95 Hdbk, $17.95 Pbk.Jacob Neusner. The Transformation of Judaism: From Philosophy to Religion. Pp. 343. (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1992.) $34.95. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 29 (1):137.score: 81.0
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  39. Richard Lemay (1996). Abu Maʻšar, The Abbreviation of the Introduction to Astrology, Together with the Medieval Latin Translation of Adelard of Bath, Ed. And Trans. Charles Burnett, Keiji Yamamoto, and Michio Yano.(Islamic Philosophy, Theology, and Science, 15.) Leiden, New York, and Cologne: EJ Brill, 1994. Pp. Viii, 170; Tables. $57.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (2):384-385.score: 81.0
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  40. David C. Lindberg (1983). Anneliese Maier, On the Threshold of Exact Science: Selected Writings of Anneliese Maier on Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Ed. And Trans. Steven D. Sargent. (The Middle Ages.) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1982. Pp. Xiv, 173. $21.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 58 (4):1129.score: 81.0
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  41. L. Sturlese (1989). Philosophy and Natural-Science of the Middle-High-German'lucidarius'-on the Diffusion of Texts and Ideas of Guillaume-de-Conches in Medieval Germany. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 9 (2):161-183.score: 81.0
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  42. John L. Treloar (1977). "The Cultural Context of Medieval Learning: Proceedings of the First Intemational Colloquium on Philosophy, Science, and Theology in the Middle Ages—1973," Edited with an Introduction by John Emery Murdoch and Edith Dudley Sylla. The Modern Schoolman 54 (4):416-417.score: 81.0
  43. Massimo Pigliucci (2008). The Borderlands Between Science and Philosophy. Quarterly Review of Biology 83 (1):7-15.score: 80.0
    Science and philosophy have a very long history, dating back at least to the 16th and 17th centuries, when the first scientist-philosophers, such as Bacon, Galilei, and Newton, were beginning the process of turning natural philosophy into science. Contemporary relationships between the two fields are still to some extent marked by the distrust that maintains the divide between the so-called “two cultures.” An increasing number of philosophers, however, are making conceptual contributions to sciences ranging from quantum mechanics to (...)
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  44. Gideon Manning (ed.) (2012). Matter and Form in Early Modern Science and Philosophy. Brill.score: 80.0
    Bringing together an international team of historians of science and philosophy to discuss the fate of matter and form, this volume shows how disputes about matter and form spurred innovation as well as conservatism in early modern science ...
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  45. Dachun Liu & Yongmou Liu (2009). A Reflection on the Alternative Philosophy of Science. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):576-588.score: 79.0
    A prominent phenomenon in contemporary philosophy of science has been the unexpected rise of alternative philosophers of science. This article analyses in depth such alternative philosophers of science as Paul Feyerabend, Richard Rorty, and Michel Foucault, summarizing the similarities and differences between alternative philosophies of science and traditional philosophy of science so as to unveil the trends in contemporary philosophy of science. With its different principles and foundation, alternative philosophy of science has made breakthroughs in terms (...)
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  46. Massimo Pigliucci (2004). What is Philosophy of Science Good For? Philosophy Now 44:45.score: 79.0
    What is the purpose of philosophy of science? Here are some answers.
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  47. Gregor Reisch (2010). Natural Philosophy Epitomised: A Translation of Books 8-11 of Gregor Reisch's Philosophical Pearl (1503). Ashgate.score: 79.0
    Its author was a Carthusian monk. Offered here is a translation, with annotation and an important introduction, of the four books on natural philosophy, the predecessor of modern science.
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  48. Bence Nanay (2013). From Philosophy of Science to Philosophy of Literature (and Back) Via Philosophy of Mind. Philip Kitcher’s Philosophical Pendulum. Theoria (77):257-264.score: 78.0
    A recent focus of Philip Kitcher’s research has been, somewhat surprisingly in the light of his earlier work, the philosophical analyses of literary works and operas. Some may see a discontinuity in Kitcher’s oeuvre in this respect – it may be difficult to see how his earlier contributions to philosophy of science relate to this much less mainstream approach to philosophy. The aim of this paper is to show that there is no such discontinuity: Kitcher’s contributions to the (...)
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  49. Robert Garland Colodny (1962). Frontiers of Science and Philosophy. Pittsburgh]University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 78.0
    Six essays by noted philosophers of science include the following topics: explanation in science and in history; philosophy and the scientific image of man; ...
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  50. Philipp Frank (1957/2004). Philosophy of Science: The Link Between Science and Philosophy. Dover Publications.score: 78.0
    A great mathematician and teacher, and a physicist and philosopher in his own right, bridges the gap between science and the humanities in this exposition of the philosophy of science. He traces the history of science from Aristotle to Einstein to illustrate philosophy's ongoing role in the scientific process. In this volume he explains modern technology's gradual erosion of the rapport between physical theories and philosophical systems, and offers suggestions for restoring the link between these related areas. This (...)
     
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