Search results for 'Scientists Biography' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    George Sarton (1921). Materials for the Biography of Contemporary Scientists. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 4:161-219.
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  2. Frederick E. Brasch (1924). Materials for the Biography of Contemporary Scientists. Isis 6 (3):460-474.
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  3. Helge Kragh (2015). On Scientific Biography and Biographies of Scientists. In Ana Simões, Jürgen Renn & Theodore Arabatzis (eds.), Relocating the History of Science. Springer International Publishing
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  4. William Montgomery (1983). Concise Dictionary of Scientific Biography by James F. Maurer; A Biographical Encyclopedia of Scientists by John Daintith; Sarah Mitchell; Elizabeth Tootil. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 74:257-258.
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  5. Robert Seidel (1990). Books on the BombAtomic Bomb Scientists: Memoirs, 1939-1945Joseph J. ErmencThe End of the World That Was: Six Lives in the Atomic AgePeter GoldmanManhattan: The Army and the Atomic BombVincent C. JonesDay of the Bomb: Countdown to HiroshimaDan KurzmanThe General and the Bomb: A Biography of General Leslie R. Groves, Director of the Manhattan ProjectWilliam LawrenTime Bomb: Fermi, Heisenberg, and the Race for the Atomic BombMalcolm C. MacPhersonThe Making of the Atomic AgeAlwyn McKayThe Road to Trinity: A Personal Account of How America's Nuclear Policies Were MadeK. D. NicholsThe Making of the Atomic BombRichard RhodesStallion GateMartin Cruz SmithThe Atomic Scientists: A Biographical HistoryHenry A. Boorse Lloyd Motz Jefferson Hane WeaverForging the Atomic Shield: Excerpts From the Office Diary of Gordon E. DeanGordon E. Dean Roger M. AndersThe Nuclear Oracles: A Political History of the General Advisory Committee of the Atomic Energy Commission, 1947-1977Richard T. SylvesBetter a Shi. [REVIEW] Isis 81 (3):519-537.
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  6. Renate Tobies (2016). Magdolna Hargittai.Women Scientists: Reflections, Challenges, and Breaking Boundaries. Xiii + 363 Pp., Figs., Index. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. £20.49 .Paola Govoni; Zelda Alice Franceschi .Writing About Lives in Science: Biography, Gender, and Genre. 287 Pp. Göttingen: V&R Unipress, 2014. €44.99. [REVIEW] Isis 107 (2):382-383.
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  7. Tadeusz Alek-Kowalski (1993). Sociological Studies. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego.
     
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  8. John Henry Bridges (1914). The Life & Work of Roger Bacon: An Introduction to the Opus Majus. Richwood Pub. Co..
  9.  8
    Babette Babich (2015). Calling Science Pseudoscience: Fleck's Archaeologies of Fact and Latour's ‘Biography of an Investigation’ in AIDS Denialism and Homeopathy. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 29 (1):1-39.
    Fleck's Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact foregrounds claims traditionally excluded from reception, often regarded as opposed to fact, scientific claims that are increasingly seldom discussed in connection with philosophy of science save as examples of pseudoscience. I am especially concerned with scientists who question the epidemiological link between HIV and AIDS and who are thereby discounted—no matter their credentials, no matter the cogency of their arguments, no matter the sobriety of their statistics—but also with other classic examples (...)
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  10. A. P. Martinich (1999). Hobbes a Biography. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Thomas Hobbes is recognized as one of the fathers of modern philosophy and political theory. In his own time he was as famous for his work in physics, geometry, and religion. He associated with some of the greatest writers, scientists, and politicians of his age. Martinich has written a complete and accessible biography of Hobbes. The book takes full account of the historical and cultural context in which Hobbes lived, drawing on both published and unpublished sources. It will (...)
     
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  11. A. P. Martinich (1999). Hobbes: A Biography. Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Hobbes is recognized as one of the fathers of modern philosophy and political theory. In his own time he was as famous for his work in physics, geometry, and religion. He associated with some of the greatest writers, scientists, and politicians of his age. Martinich has written a complete and accessible biography of Hobbes. The book takes full account of the historical and cultural context in which Hobbes lived, drawing on both published and unpublished sources. It will (...)
     
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  12.  6
    Michael R. Dietrich (2011). Reinventing Richard Goldschmidt: Reputation, Memory, and Biography. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):693 - 712.
    Richard Goldschmidt was one of the most controversial biologists of the mid-twentieth century. Rather than fade from view, Goldschmidt's work and reputation has persisted in the biological community long after he has. Goldschmidt's longevity is due in large part to how he was represented by Stephen J. Gould. When viewed from the perspective of the biographer, Gould's revival of Goldschmidt as an evolutionary heretic in the 1970s and 1980s represents a selective reinvention of Goldschmidt that provides a contrast to other (...)
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  13.  2
    Thomas Söderqvist (2011). The Seven Sisters: Subgenres of "Bioi" of Contemporary Life Scientists. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):633 - 650.
    Today, scientific biography is primarily thought of as a way of writing contextual history of science. But the genre has other functions as well. This article discusses seven kinds of ideal-typical subgenres of scientific biography. In addition to its mainstream function as an ancilla historiae, it is also frequently used to enrich the understanding of the individual construction of scientific knowledge, to promote the public engagement with science, and as a substitute for belles-lettres. Currently less acknowledged kinds of (...)
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  14.  42
    Peter S. Alagona (2004). Biography of a "Feathered Pig": The California Condor Conservation Controversy. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):557 - 583.
    In the early 20th century, after hundreds of years of gradual decline, the California condor emerged as an object of intensive scientific study, an important conservation target, and a cultural icon of the American wilderness preservation movement. Early condor researchers generally believed that the species' survival depended upon the preservation of its wilderness habitat. However, beginning in the 1970s, a new generation of scientists argued that no amount of wilderness could prevent the condor's decline and that only intensive scientific (...)
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  15.  68
    Kay Herrmann (1994). Jakob Friedrich Fries (1773-1843): Eine Philosophie der Exakten Wissenschaften. Tabula Rasa. Jenenser Zeitschrift Für Kritisches Denken (6).
    Jakob Friedrich Fries (1773-1843): A Philosophy of the Exact Sciences -/- Shortened version of the article of the same name in: Tabula Rasa. Jenenser magazine for critical thinking. 6th of November 1994 edition -/- 1. Biography -/- Jakob Friedrich Fries was born on the 23rd of August, 1773 in Barby on the Elbe. Because Fries' father had little time, on account of his journeying, he gave up both his sons, of whom Jakob Friedrich was the elder, to the Herrnhut (...)
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  16.  40
    Hugh Lacey (2016). Science, Respect for Nature, and Human Well-Being: Democratic Values and the Responsibilities of Scientists Today. Foundations of Science 21 (1):51-67.
    The central question addressed is: How should scientific research be conducted so as to ensure that nature is respected and the well being of everyone everywhere enhanced? After pointing to the importance of methodological pluralism for an acceptable answer and to obstacles posed by characterizing scientific methodology too narrowly, which are reinforced by the ‘commercial-scientific ethos’, two additional questions are considered: How might research, conducted in this way, have impact on—and depend on—strengthening democratic values and practices? And: What is thereby (...)
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  17.  16
    Rosalyn W. Berne (2006). Nanotalk: Conversations with Scientists and Engineers About Ethics, Meaning, and Belief in the Development of Nanotechnology. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    No one really knows where nanotechnology is leading, what its pursuit will mean, and how it may affect human and other forms of life. Nevertheless, its research and development are moving briskly into that unknown. It has been suggested that rapid movement towards 'who knows where' is endemic to all technological development; that its researchers pursue it for curiosity and enjoyment, without knowing the consequences, believing that their efforts will be beneficial. Further, that the enthusiasm for development comes with no (...)
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  18.  40
    Abraham Pais (1986). Inward Bound: Of Matter and Forces in the Physical World. Oxford University Press.
    Abraham Pais's Subtle Is the Lord was a publishing phenomenon: a mathematically sophisticated exposition of the science and the life of Albert Einstein that reached a huge audience and won an American Book Award. Reviewers hailed the book as "a monument to sound scholarship and graceful style", "an extraordinary biography of an extraordinary man", and "a fine book". In this groundbreaking new volume, Pais undertakes a history of the physics of matter and of physical forces since the discovery of (...)
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  19. Vasso Kindi (2012). Collingwoods Opposition to Biography. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):44-59.
    Abstract Biography is usually distinguished from history and, in comparison, looked down upon. R. G. Collingwood's view of biography seems to fit this statement considering that he says it has only gossip-value and that “history it can never be“. His main concern is that biography exploits and arouses emotions which he excludes from the domain of history. In the paper I will try to show that one can salvage a more positive view of biography from within (...)
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  20. Vivian Weil (2002). Making Sense of Scientists' Responsibilities at the Interface of Science and Society. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (2):223-227.
    As Kenneth Pimple points out, scientists’ responsibilities to the larger society have received less attention than ethical issues internal to the practice of science. Yet scientists and specialists who study science have begun to provide analyses of the foundations and scope of scientsts’ responsibilities to society. An account of contributions from Kristen Shrader-Frechette, Melanie Leitner, Ullica Segerstråle, John Ahearne, Helen Longino, and Carl Cranor offers work on scientists’ social responsibilities upon which to build.
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  21.  36
    Richard Peterson (2010). When Scientists Go to War. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell 420--428.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * 1 Science and Scientists in Conflict – the Case of Bohr and Heisenberg * 2 Professional/Personal Ethics in a Time Of War – Meitner, Einstein, Compton, and Wilson * 3 An Existential Experience: The Epiphany of the First Atomic Bomb Test * References.
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  22.  13
    Alan Petersen & Alison Anderson (2007). A Question of Balance or Blind Faith?: Scientists' and Science Policymakers' Representations of the Benefits and Risks of Nanotechnologies. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (3):243-256.
    In recent years, in the UK and elsewhere, scientists and science policymakers have grappled with the question of how to reap the benefits of nanotechnologies while minimising the risks. Having recognised the importance of public support for future innovations, they have placed increasing emphasis on ‘engaging’ ‘the public’ during the early phase of technology development. Meaningful engagement suggests some common ground between experts and lay publics in relation to the definition of nanotechnologies and of their benefits and risks. However, (...)
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  23.  23
    J. R. Lucas, Wilberforce and Huxley: A Legendary Encounter.
    The legend of the encounter between Wilberforce and Huxley is well established. Almost every scientist knows, and every viewer of the BBC's recent programme on Darwin was shown,* how Samuel Wilberforce, bishop of Oxford, attempted to pour scorn on Darwin's Origin of Species at a meeting of the British Association in Oxford on 30 June 1860, and had the tables turned on him by T. H. Huxley. In this memorable encounter Huxley's simple scientific sincerity humbled the prelatical insolence and clerical (...)
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  24.  9
    Kathryn Nixdorff (2013). Education for Life Scientists on the Dual-Use Implications of Their Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1487-1490.
    Advances in the life sciences are occurring with extreme rapidity and accumulating a great deal of knowledge about life’s vital processes. While this knowledge is essential for fighting disease in a more effective way, it can also be misused either intentionally or inadvertently to develop novel and more effective biological weapons. For nearly a decade civil-academic society as well as States Parties to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention have recognised the importance of dual-use biosecurity education for life scientists (...)
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  25. Carlo Cercignani (1998). Ludwig Boltzmann: The Man Who Trusted Atoms. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The book presents the life and personality, the scientific and philosophical work of Ludwig Boltzmann, one of the great scientists who marked the passage from 19th to 20th century physics. His rich and tragic life, ending by suicide at the age of 62, is described in detail. A substantial part of the book is devoted to discussing his scientific and philosophical ideas and placing them in the context of the second half of the 19th century. The fact that Boltzmann (...)
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  26. Stefania Ruzsits Jha (2002). Reconsidering Michael Polanyi's Philosophy. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    The chemist and philosopher Michael Polanyi was one of the first twentieth-century scientists to propose a program to resolve the internal conflict of the modern Enlightenment: scientific detachment and moral nihilism with humanist values. Stefania Jha’s intellectual biography places Polanyi in the context of his time and culture, analyzes his key philosophical ideas, and explicates the application—and at times misappropriation—of his work. Polanyi’s method was not laid out in his published works, and his vocabulary tends to make his (...)
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  27.  23
    Ademola A. Adenle (2014). Stakeholders' Perceptions of GM Technology in West Africa: Assessing the Responses of Policymakers and Scientists in Ghana and Nigeria. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):241-263.
    The perception of two key stakeholders such as policymakers and scientists on genetic modification (GM) technology was examined in Ghana and Nigeria using semi-structured interviews. A total sample of 20 policymakers (16 at ministries and 4 at parliament/cabinet) and 58 scientists (43 at research institutes and 15 at universities) participated at the interviews. This study revealed respondents perspectives on potential benefits and risks of GM technology, status and development of biosafety regulatory frameworks, role of science and technology innovation (...)
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  28.  8
    Nathaniel Comfort (2011). When Your Sources Talk Back: Toward a Multimodal Approach to Scientific Biography. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):651 - 669.
    Interviewing offers the biographer unique opportunities for gathering data. I offer three examples. The emphatic bacterial geneticist Norton Zinder confronted me with an interpretation of Barbara McClintock's science that was as surprising as it proved to be robust. The relaxed setting of the human geneticist Walter Nance's rural summer home contributed to an unusually improvisational oral history that produced insights into his experimental and thinking style. And "embedding" myself with the biochemical geneticist Charles Scriver in his home, workplace, and city (...)
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  29.  15
    Christopher P. Toumey (2008). Reading Feynman Into Nanotechnology. Techne 12 (3):133-168.
    As histories of nanotechnology are created, one question arises repeatedly: how influential was Richard Feynman’s 1959 talk, “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom”? It is often said by knowledgeable people that this talk was the origin of nanotech. It preceded events like the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope, but did it inspire scientists to do things they would not have done otherwise? Did Feynman’s paper directly influence important scientific developments in nanotechnology? Or is his paper being retroactively (...)
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  30.  7
    Dennis Bray & Hans von Storch (forthcoming). The Normative Orientations of Climate Scientists. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-17.
    In 1942 Robert K. Merton tried to demonstrate the structure of the normative system of science by specifying the norms that characterized it. The norms were assigned the abbreviation CUDOs: Communism, Universalism, Disinterestedness, and Organized skepticism. Using the results of an on-line survey of climate scientists concerning the norms of science, this paper explores the climate scientists’ subscription to these norms. The data suggests that while Merton’s CUDOs remain the overall guiding moral principles, they are not fully endorsed (...)
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  31.  2
    Fiammetta Palladini (2015). Grotius’s Biography: On Henk Nellen’s Hugo Grotius. A Lifelong Struggle. Grotiana 36 (1):40-61.
    _ Source: _Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 40 - 61 In this review article of Henk Nellen, _Hugo Grotius. A lifelong struggle for Peace in Church and State, 1583–1645_ the story of Grotius’s life is outlined and issues of interpretation are discussed. It is argued that this biography supports the argument that Grotius towards the end of his life was close to becoming a Catholic. It seems plausible that Grotius’s principled refusal to request permission to return to the Republic (...)
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  32. Mary Pickering (1993). Auguste Comte: An Intellectual Biography. Cambridge University Press.
    This book constitutes the first volume of a projected two-volume intellectual biography of Auguste Comte, the founder of modern sociology and a philosophical movement called positivism. Volume One offers a reinterpretation of Comte's "first career," (1798-1842) when he completed the scientific foundation of his philosophy. It describes the interplay between Comte's ideas and the historical context of postrevolutionary France, his struggles with poverty and mental illness, and his volatile relationships with friends, family, and colleagues, including such famous contemporaries as (...)
     
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  33.  17
    John Thomas Brittingham (2013). Book Review: Benoît Peeters, Derrida: A Biography. [REVIEW] Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):199-204.
    A review of Benoit Peeters, Derrida: A Biography, trans. Andrew Brown (Cambridge: Polity, 2013).
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  34.  13
    Katerina Zabrodska & Constance Ellwood (2011). Subjectivity as a Play of Territorialization: Exploring Affective Attachments to Place Through Collective Biography. Human Affairs 21 (2):184-195.
    In this paper the authors seek to contribute to a new ontology of an embodied, desiring subject through an exploration of their own subjectivities and of the ways in which subjectivities are produced and transformed through affective attachments to place. Using the method of collective biography and drawing on Deleuze and Guattari’s concepts of desire and territorialization they examine their affective responses and attachments to place: Australia and the Czech Republic. As a point of departure for their analysis, the (...)
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  35.  12
    Oren Harman (2011). Helical Biography and the Historical Craft: The Case of Altruism and George Price. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):671 - 691.
    The life of George Price (1922-1975), the eccentric polymath genius and father of the Price equation, is used as a prism and counterpoint through which to consider an age-old evolutionary conundrum: the origins of altruism. This biographical project, and biography and history more generally, are considered in terms of the possibility of using form to convey content in particular ways. Closer to an art form than a science, this approach to scholarship presents both a unique challenge and promise.
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  36.  12
    Stanley Joel Reiser & Ruth E. Bulger (1997). The Social Responsibilities of Biological Scientists. Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (2):137-143.
    Biological scientists, like scientists in other disciplines, are uncertain about whether or how to use their knowledge and time to provide society with insight and guidance in handling the effects of inventions and discoveries. This article addresses this issue. It presents a typography of structures in which scientists may contribute to social understanding and decisions. It describes the different ways in which these contributions can be made. Finally it develops the ethical arguments that justify the view that (...)
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  37. Carlo Cercignani (2006). Ludwig Boltzmann: The Man Who Trusted Atoms. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This book presents the life and personality, the scientific and philosophical work of Ludwig Boltzmann, one of the great scientists who marked the passage from 19th- to 20th-Century physics. His rich and tragic life, ending by suicide at the age of 62, is described in detail. A substantial part of the book is devoted to discussing his scientific and philosophical ideas and placing them in the context of the second half of the 19th century. The fact that Boltzmann was (...)
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  38. Linda Merricks (1996). The World Made New: Frederick Soddy, Science, Politics, and Environment. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This is the biography of one of the most original and widely significant, yet largely forgotten, British scientists. Frederick Soddy is an intriguing figure who was deeply concerned with and involved in politics, economics, and the role of science in the world. He was one of the first generation of English atomic scientists, working with Rutherford on the initial discoveries about atomic disintegration, and received the Nobel Prize in 1921 for hi research on isotopes. Soddy's worry about (...)
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  39.  3
    Manfred Kuehn (1996). Review: Stark, Werner, Nachforschungen zu Briefen und Handschriften Immanuel Kants. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (1):146-149.
    146 JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 34:1 JANUARY 1996 thought that the two were incompatible and opted for one or the other. Others, most notably Robert Boyle, "the Christian Virtuoso," thought that the two were compatible. The most reliable kind of person was the Christian gentleman, because he was a supposedly disinterested spectator. Physicians, chemists, schoolmen, priests, and pro- fessional authors all had professional or mercenary interests that made their testimony suspect. A large part of the book, especially chapters (...)
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  40.  17
    Mott T. Greene (2007). Writing Scientific Biography. Journal of the History of Biology 40 (4):727 - 759.
    Much writing on scientific biography focuses on the legitimacy and utility of this genre. In contrast, this essay discusses a variety of genre conventions and imperatives which continue to exert a powerful influence on the selection of biographical subjects, and to control the plot and structure of the ensuing biographies. These imperatives include the following: the plot templates of the Bildungsroman (the realistic novel of individual self-development), the life trajectories of Weberian ideal types, and the functional elements and personae (...)
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  41.  4
    Naomi Pasachoff (2014). Celebrating Photography’s Two Fathers. Metascience 23 (3):639-643.
    In early 1839, two very different geniuses, one French and one English, told the world about their discoveries of two different ways of creating permanent photographic images. Anticipating the 2014 celebration of the 175th anniversary of those events, Capturing the Light comes as a welcome gift recognizing the birth of photography. More than a rich, if condensed, dual biography of Louis Daguerre (1787–1851) and Henry Talbot (1800–1877), the book is a clear and fascinating account of the history of photography (...)
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  42.  4
    Guido Vanheeswijck (2012). History Man. The First Biography on R.G. Collingwood. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):134-142.
    Abstract Is `History Man', Fred Inglis' biography on R.G. Collingwood a successful biography? Inglis' explicit ambition is to portray the concrete figure Collingwood by abducting him from what he calls the vacuum-packed academic world of scholars. But the best biographers look for a balanced equilibrium between rendering philosophical ideas and dramatizing a philosopher's life. Put another way, they evoke the interweaving of a philosopher's thought with the vicissitudes of his life. Despite the unmistakable qualities of this biography, (...)
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  43.  1
    Anders Persson, Sven Hemlin & Stellan Welin (2007). Profitable Exchanges for Scientists: The Case of Swedish Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 15 (4):291-304.
    In this article two inter-related issues concerning the ongoing commercialisation of biomedical research are analyzed. One aim is to explain how scientists and clinicians at Swedish public institutions can make profits, both commercially and scientifically, by controlling rare human biological material, like embryos and embryonic stem cell lines. This control in no way presupposes legal ownership or other property rights as an initial condition. We show how ethically sensitive material (embryos and stem cell lines) have been used in Sweden (...)
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  44. William F. Brewer & Marlene Schommer-Aikins (2006). Scientists Are Not Deficient in Mental Imagery: Galton Revised. Review of General Psychology 10:130-146.
    In 1880, Galton carried out an investigation of imagery in a sample of distinguished men and a sample of nonscientists (adolescent male students). He concluded that scientists were either totally lacking in visual imagery or had “feeble” powers of mental imagery. This finding has been widely accepted in the secondary literature in psychology. A replication of Galton’s study with modern scientists and modern university undergraduates found no scientists totally lacking in visual imagery and very few with feeble (...)
     
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  45.  2
    Kay Herrmann (2000). Mathematische Naturphilosophie in der Grundlagendiskussion – Eine Studie über das Verhältnis von Jakob Friedrich Fries’ kritischer Philosophie zu Naturwissenschaft und Mathematik. Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht.
    Jakob Friedrich Fries is one of the most important representatives of the Critical Philosophy, someone who built immediately on the original Kantian philosophy. -/- Fries was born in 1773 in Barby (on the Elbe). In 1805 he was extraordinary professor for philosophy in Jena and in the same year was ordinary professor for philosophy in Heidelberg. Returning to Jena in 1816, one year later he was compulsorily retired because of his participation at the nationalistic and republican Wartburg Festival. In 1924 (...)
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  46. Margaret P. Munger (ed.) (2003). The History of Psychology: Fundamental Questions. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The History of Psychology: Fundamental Questions provides significant excerpts from the philosophers, theologians, and scientists who contributed to the development of psychology. It also includes more recent works covering issues and ideas in cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Extensively classroom-tested, this anthology addresses a comprehensive range of topics, yet is suitable for use as a core text or as a supplement in a single-semester course on the history of psychology. The History of Psychology offers selections from: · Aristotle · St. (...)
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  47. Renée Weber (ed.) (1986). Dialogues with Scientists and Sages: The Search for Unity. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
     
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  48.  15
    Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis (1999). Living with Your Biographical Subject: Special Problems of Distance, Privacy and Trust in the Biography of G. Ledyard Stebbins Jr. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (3):421 - 438.
    This paper explores the special problems encountered by the biographer of a living scientific subject. In particular, it explores the complex of problems that emerges from the intense interpersonal dynamic involving issues of distance, privacy and trust. It also explores methodological problems having to do with oral history interviews and other supporting documentation. It draws on the personal experience of the author and the biographical subject of G. Ledyard Stebbins Jr., the botanist, geneticist and evolutionist. It also offers prescriptives and (...)
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  49.  3
    Mary Edwards (2015). Thomas R. Flynn, Sartre: A Philosophical Biography. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (6):296-298.
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  50. P. B. Medawar (1990). The Threat and the Glory: Reflections on Science and Scientists. Oxford University Press.
     
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