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  1. Guy E. Hawkins, A. A. J. Marley, Andrew Heathcote, Terry N. Flynn, Jordan J. Louviere & Scott D. Brown (2014). Integrating Cognitive Process and Descriptive Models of Attitudes and Preferences. Cognitive Science 38 (4):701-735.
    Discrete choice experiments—selecting the best and/or worst from a set of options—are increasingly used to provide more efficient and valid measurement of attitudes or preferences than conventional methods such as Likert scales. Discrete choice data have traditionally been analyzed with random utility models that have good measurement properties but provide limited insight into cognitive processes. We extend a well-established cognitive model, which has successfully explained both choices and response times for simple decision tasks, to complex, multi-attribute discrete choice data. The (...)
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  2. Dora Matzke, Jonathon Love, Thomas V. Wiecki, Scott D. Brown, Gordon D. Logan & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers (2013). Release the BEESTS: Bayesian Estimation of Ex-Gaussian STop-Signal Reaction Time Distributions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    The stop-signal paradigm is frequently used to study response inhibition. In this paradigm, participants perform a two-choice response time task where the primary task is occasionally interrupted by a stop-signal that prompts participants to withhold their response. The primary goal is to estimate the latency of the unobservable stop response (stop signal reaction time or SSRT). Recently, Matzke, Dolan, Logan, Brown, and Wagenmakers (in press) have developed a Bayesian parametric approach that allows for the estimation of the entire distribution of (...)
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  3. Alexander Provost, Blake Johnson, Frini Karayanidis, Scott D. Brown & Andrew Heathcote (2013). Two Routes to Expertise in Mental Rotation. Cognitive Science 37 (7):1321-1342.
    The ability to imagine objects undergoing rotation (mental rotation) improves markedly with practice, but an explanation of this plasticity remains controversial. Some researchers propose that practice speeds up the rate of a general-purpose rotation algorithm. Others maintain that performance improvements arise through the adoption of a new cognitive strategy—repeated exposure leads to rapid retrieval from memory of the required response to familiar mental rotation stimuli. In two experiments we provide support for an integrated explanation of practice effects in mental rotation (...)
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  4. Guy Hawkins, Scott D. Brown, Mark Steyvers & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers (2012). Context Effects in Multi-Alternative Decision Making: Empirical Data and a Bayesian Model. Cognitive Science 36 (3):498-516.
    For decisions between many alternatives, the benchmark result is Hick's Law: that response time increases log-linearly with the number of choice alternatives. Even when Hick's Law is observed for response times, divergent results have been observed for error rates—sometimes error rates increase with the number of choice alternatives, and sometimes they are constant. We provide evidence from two experiments that error rates are mostly independent of the number of choice alternatives, unless context effects induce participants to trade speed for accuracy (...)
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