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  1. Scott Friskics (2010). The Wilderness Debate Rages On. Environmental Ethics 32 (1):85-90.
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  2. Scott Friskics (2008). The Twofold Myth of Pristine Wilderness. Environmental Ethics 30 (4):381-399.
    In recent years, the notion of wilderness has been roundly criticized by several prominent environmental philosophers and historians. They argue that the “received wilderness idea” is dualistic, ethnocentric, and static. According to these critics, this idea of wilderness finds clear expression in the Wilderness Act of 1964. However, the idea of wilderness so ably deconstructed by its critics bears little resemblance to the understanding of wilderness presented in the Wilderness Act. The critics assume a backward-looking, purity-based definition of wilderness that (...)
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  3. Scott Friskics (2003). Dialogue, Responsibility, and Oil and Gas Leasing on Montana's Rocky Mountain Front. Ethics and the Environment 8 (2):8-30.
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  4. Scott Friskics (2001). Dialogical Relations with Nature. Environmental Ethics 23 (4):391-410.
    I suggest that our dialogical encounters with our fellow creatures furnish the experiential ground of ethical action with respect to them. Unfortunately, this ground is seldom realized or recognized in our society; our capacity for ethical action remains unmoored from its animating sources. Yet despite our habitual inattentiveness, nature’s creatures may still grace us with their presence in dialogue. The works of Martin Buber and Henry Bugbee provide the theoretical framework within which I attempt to work through these ideas and (...)
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  5. Scott Friskics (2001). How Does Nature Speak to OurConcern? Jhe Case of Montana's Rocky Mountain Front. In Laura Duhan Kaplan (ed.), Philosophy and Everyday Life. Seven Bridges Press. 193.
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