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  1. Scott Jenkins (2014). Nietzsche's Use of Monumental History. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):169-181.
    Of the three forms of history that Nietzsche describes in "On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life," monumental history is the one that pertains to us as beings who act and strive (HL 2, p. 67).1 Thus, one might reasonably expect monumental history to play a significant role in Nietzsche’s later accounts of life-enhancing practices. But when we turn to Nietzsche’s later writings, there is absolutely no mention of monumental history. It seems to disappear along with so-called "antiquarian" (...)
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  2. Scott Jenkins (2014). Tragedy, Recognition, and the Death of God: Studies in Hegel and Nietzsche, by Robert R. Williams. Mind 123 (489):260-264.
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  3. Scott Jenkins (2013). The Flame of Eternity: An Interpretation of Nietzsche's Thought (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (1):140-141.
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  4. Scott Jenkins (2012). Nietzsche's Questions Concerning the Will to Truth. Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):265-289.
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  5. Scott Jenkins (2012). Time and Personal Identity in Nietzsche's Theory of Eternal Recurrence. Philosophy Compass 7 (3):208-217.
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  6. Scott Jenkins (2011). Hegel on Space: A Critique of Kant's Transcendental Philosophy. Inquiry 53 (4):326-355.
    This paper considers Hegel's views on space and his account of Kant's theory of space. I show that Hegel's discussions of space exhibit a deep understanding of Kant's apriority argument in the first Critique , commit him to the central premise of that argument, and separate his concerns from the familiar problem of the neglected alternative. Nevertheless, Hegel makes two objections to Kant's theory of space. First, he argues that the theory is internally inconsistent insofar as Kant's identification of space (...)
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  7. Scott Jenkins (2011). What Does Nietzsche Owe Thucydides? Journal of Nietzsche Studies 42 (1):32-50.
    In the concluding section of Twilight of the Idols, entitled "What I Owe the Ancients," Nietzsche tells us that his debt to the Greeks has little to do with Greek philosophy. Plato is portrayed as simply a step toward Christian moralism, and Nietzsche states more generally that "the philosophers are the decadents of Greek culture" (TI "Ancients" 3).1 In contrast, he remarks that "my recreation, my preference, my cure from all Platonism has always been Thucydides" (TI "Ancients" 2). This esteem (...)
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  8. Scott Jenkins (2010). selF-ConsCiousness, sysTem, dialeCTiC. In Dean Moyar (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge. 3.
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  9. Scott Jenkins (2010). Nietzsche's Therapy: Self-Cultivation in the Middle Works (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 39 (1):93-96.
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  10. Scott Jenkins (2009). Hegel's Concept of Desire. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 103-130.
    Hegel’s assertion that self-consciousness is desire in general stands at a critical point in the Phenomenology , but the concept of desire employed in this identification is obscure. I examine three ways in which Hegel’s concept of desire might be understood and conclude that this concept is closely related to Fichte’s notions of drive and longing. So understood, the concept plays an essential role in Hegel’s non-foundational, non-genetic account of the awareness that individual rational subjects have of themselves. This account, (...)
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  11. Scott Jenkins (2008). Review of Brian Leiter, Neil Sinhababu (Eds.), Nietzsche and Morality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (1).
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  12. Scott Jenkins (2008). Review of Leiter & Sinhababu (2007). [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1 (3).
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  13. Scott Jenkins (2006). Hegel's Epistemology. The Owl of Minerva 38 (1-2):151-158.
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  14. Scott Jenkins (2006). Hegel's Epistemology: A Philosophical Introduction to the Phenomenology of Spirit, by Kenneth R. Westphal. The Owl of Minerva 38 (1/2):151-158.
     
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  15. Scott Jenkins (2003). Morality, Agency, and Freedom in Nietzsche's "Genealogy of Morals". History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (1):61 - 80.
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