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  1.  10 DLs
    Lori Marino, Scott O. Lilienfeld, Randy Malamud, Nathan Nobis & Ron Broglio (2010). Do Zoos and Aquariums Promote Attitude Change in Visitors? A Critical Evaluation of the American Zoo and Aquarium Study. Society and Animals 18 (2):126-138.
    Modern-day zoos and aquariums market themselves as places of education and conservation. A recent study conducted by the American Zoo and Aquarium Association is being widely heralded as the first direct evidence that visits to zoos and aquariums produce long-term positive effects on people’s attitudes toward other animals. In this paper, we address whether this conclusion is warranted by analyzing the study’s methodological soundness. We conclude that Falk et al. contains at least six major threats to methodological validity that undermine (...)
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  2.  5 DLs
    Randy Malamud, Lori Marino, Nathan Nobis, Ron Broglio & Scott O. Lilienfeld (2010). Do Zoos and Aquariums Promote Attitude Change in Visitors? A Critical Evaluation of the American Zoo and Aquarium Study. Society and Animals 18 (2):126-138.
    Modern-day zoos and aquariums market themselves as places of education and conservation. A recent study conducted by the American Zoo and Aquarium Association is being widely heralded as the first direct evidence that visits to zoos and aquariums produce long-term positive effects on people’s attitudes toward other animals. In this paper, we address whether this conclusion is warranted by analyzing the study’s methodological soundness. We conclude that Falk et al. contains at least six major threats to methodological validity that undermine (...)
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  3.  3 DLs
    Lori Marino, Randy Malamud, Ron Broglio, Scott O. Lilienfeld & Nathan Nobis (2011). Strong Claims, Feeble Evidence: A Rejoinder to Falk Et Al. (2010). Society and Animals 19 (3):291-293.
    The criticisms of Falk et al. are addressed, and the question of whether claims made by Falk et al. are valid is revisited. This rebuttal contends that Falk et al. misconstrue Popper’s role in philosophy of science and hence do not provide a strong test of their hypothesis. Falk et al. claim that they never made causal statements about the impact of zoo and aquarium visits in their 2007 study. Yet, this commentary shows that Falk et al. draw several unsupported, (...)
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  4.  2 DLs
    Scott O. Lilienfeld (2006). The Heuristic Value of Controversy in Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):580-581.
    Ceci et al.'s (2006) findings remind us that tenure rarely serves its intended purpose. I argue that tenure often fails in part because many faculty members possess an insufficient appreciation for the heuristic value of controversy in science and other disciplines. Using two case examples from clinical/personality psychology, I show how controversial positions can draw sharp criticism while facilitating scientific progress. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  5.  1 DLs
    Scott O. Lilienfeld & Robert D. Latzman (2014). Threat Bias, Not Negativity Bias, Underpins Differences in Political Ideology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (3):318-319.
  6.  0 DLs
    Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Scott O. Lilienfeld (2007). Hypnosis and Neuroscience: Implications for the Altered State Debate. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 145-165.
     
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  7.  0 DLs
    Dennis E. Reidy, Amos Zeichner, Kallio Hunnicutt-Ferguson & Scott O. Lilienfeld (2008). Psychopathy Traits and the Processing of Emotion Words: Results of a Lexical Decision Task. Cognition and Emotion 22 (6):1174-1186.
  8.  0 DLs
    Scott O. Lilienfeld (2007). The Assault on Scientific Mental Health. In Paul Kurtz & David R. Koepsell (eds.), Science and Ethics: Can Science Help Us Make Wise Moral Judgments? Prometheus Books 208.
     
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