22 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Scott R. Sehon [11]Scott Sehon [11]
  1. Scott Sehon, Dementors, Horcruxes, and Immortality: The Soul in Harry Potter.
    Souls play a huge part in the Harry Potter story. Voldemort creates six Horcruxes, thereby dividing his own soul into seven parts, and Harry must destroy all of the Horcruxes before Voldemort can die. At different points in the books, several main characters (Harry, Sirius, and Dudley) narrowly avoid having their souls sucked out of them by a dementor; Barty Crouch, Jr., does not escape this fate. So what is the soul? In Harry Potter’s world, it is clear that people (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Scott Sehon, Teleology and Degrees of Freedom.
    There is a debate in philosophy of mind about the nature of reason explanations of action, and this volume is testament to a resurgence of interest in non-causal accounts. In Teleological Realism: Mind, Agency, and Explanation,2 I have proposed a non-causal account according to which common-sense reason explanations of action are irreducibly teleological in form. I claim that we explain behavior by citing the state of affairs towards which the agent was directing her behavior, i. e., by citing the purpose (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Scott Sehon, “Truth and Relativism”.
    By this point in orientation, you in the first year class have been talked at so much that you can easily be forgiven if you forget everything I say today. And you probably will: Last spring, I asked a group of seniors what they remembered from convocation, and none of them could come up with anything. So I figure I can say whatever I want. The only catch is that if I manage to say anything that offends some of my (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Scott Sehon (2013). Epistemic Issues in the Free Will Debate: Can We Know When We Are Free? Philosophical Studies 166 (2):363-380.
    In this paper, I argue that the views of Robert Kane on the one hand and John Fischer and Mark Ravizza on the other both lead to the following conclusion: we should have very low confidence in our ability to judge that someone is acting freely or in a way for which they can be held responsible. This in turn means, I claim, that these views, in practice, collapse into a sort of hard incompatibilist position, or the position of a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Scott Sehon (2012). Action Explanation and the Free Will Debate: How Incompatibilist Arguments Go Wrong1. Philosophical Issues 22 (1):351-368.
  6. Scott Sehon (2011). A Flawed Conception of Determinism in the Consequence Argument. Analysis 71 (1):30 - 38.
    According to the Consequence Argument, the truth of determinism plus other plausible principles would yield the conclusion that we have no free will. In this paper I will argue that the conception of determinism typically employed in the various versions of the Consequence Argument is not plausible. In particular, I will argue that, taken most straightforwardly, determinism as defined in the Consequence Argument would imply that the existence of God is logically impossible. This is quite an implausible result. The truth (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Scott Sehon (2011). Aguilar , Jesùs , and Buckareff , Andrei , Eds. Causing Human Actions: New Perspectives on the Causal Theory of Action . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2010. Pp. 336. $35.00 (Paper). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (1):168-174.
  8. Donald Stanley & Scott Sehon (2011). Taking Procrustes' Axe to Professor Fisher's Response. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):1009-1010.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Scott Sehon (2010). The Problem of Evil: Skeptical Theism Leads to Moral Paralysis. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (2):67 - 80.
    Natural disasters would seem to constitute evidence against the existence of God, for, on the face of things, it is mysterious why a completely good and all-powerful God would allow the sort of suffering we see from earthquakes, diseases, and the like. The skeptical theist replies that we should not expect to be able to understand God's ways, and thus we should not regard it as surprising or mysterious that God would allow natural evil. I argue that skeptical theism leads (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Scott Sehon & Donald Stanley (2010). Evidence and Simplicity: Why We Should Reject Homeopathy. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):276-281.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Scott Sehon (2008). Review of Mark Timmons, John Greco, Alfred R. Mele (Eds.), Rationality and the Good: Critical Essays on the Ethics and Epistemology of Robert Audi. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (3).
  12. Scott R. Sehon (2007). 8 Goal-Directed Action and Teleological Explanation. In J. K. Campbell, M. O'Rourke & H. S. Silverstein (eds.), Causation and Explanation. Mit Press. 4--155.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Scott R. Sehon (2005). Teleological Realism: Mind, Agency, and Explanation. Cambridge MA: Bradford Book/MIT Press.
  14. Scott R. Sehon (2000). An Argument Against the Causal Theory of Action Explanation. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):67-85.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Scott R. Sehon (1998). Barry Miller, A Most Unlikely God: A Philosophical Enquiry Into the Nature of God Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (2):129-131.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Scott R. Sehon (1998). Connectionism and the Causal Theory of Action Explanation. Philosophical Psychology 11 (4):511-532.
    It is widely assumed that common sense psychological explanations of human action are a species of causal explanation. I argue against this construal, drawing on Ramsey et al.'s paper, “Connectionism, eliminativism, and the future of folk psychology”. I argue that if certain connec-tionist models are correct, then mental states cannot be identified with functionally discrete causes of behavior, and I respond to some recent attempts to deny this claim. However, I further contend that our common sense psychological practices are not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Scott R. Sehon (1997). Deviant Causal Chains and the Irreducibility of Teleological Explanation. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (2):195–213.
    We typically explain human action teleologically, by citing the action's goal or purpose. However, a broad class of naturalistic projects within the philosophy of mind presuppose that teleological explanation is reducible to causal explanation. In this paper I argue that two recently suggested strategies - one suggested by Al Mele and the other proposed by John Bishop and Christopher Peacocke - fail to provide a successful causal analysis of teleological explanation. The persistent troubles encountered by the reductive project suggest that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Scott R. Sehon (1997). Natural Kind Terms and the Status of Folk Psychology. American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (3):333-44.
  19. Scott R. Sehon (1996). Okin on Feminism and Rawls. Philosophical Forum 27 (4):321-332.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Scott R. Sehon & Joseph F. Rychlak (1996). Logical Learning Theory: A Human Teleology and its Empirical Support. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):246.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Scott R. Sehon (1995). Barbara Hannan, Subjectivity and Reduction: An Introduction to the Mind-Body Problem Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (4):250-252.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Scott R. Sehon (1994). Teleology and the Nature of Mental States. American Philosophical Quarterly 31 (1):63-72.