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Profile: Scott Wisor (University of Birmingham)
  1. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2014). The Ethics of International Trade. In Darrel Moellendorf & Heather Widdows (eds.), Handbook of Global Ethics. Routledge.
  2. Scott Wisor (2014). The Moral Problem of Worse Actors. Ethics and Global Politics 7 (2):47-64.
    Individuals and institutions sometimes have morally stringent reasons to not do a given action. For example, an oil company might have morally stringent reasons to refrain from providing revenue to a genocidal regime, or an engineer might have morally stringent reasons to refrain from providing her expertise in the development of weapons of mass destruction. But in some cases, if the agent does not do the action, another actor will do it with much worse consequences. For example, the oil company (...)
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  3. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2013). Global Poverty. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
  4. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2013). World Trade Organization. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley.
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  5. Alison Jaggar & Scott Wisor (2013). Feminist Methodology in Practice: Lessons From a Research Program. In , Just Methods: An Interdisciplinary Reader. Paradigm.
    This article reflects critically on the methodology of one feminist research project which is ongoing as we write. The project is titled “Assessing Development: Designing Better Indices of Poverty and Gender Equity” and its aim is to develop a better standard or metric for measuring poverty across the world. The authors of this article are among several philosophers on the research team, which also includes scholars from the disciplines of anthropology, sociology and economics. This article begin by explaining why a (...)
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  6. Scott Wisor (2013). Gender Injustice and the Resource Curse: Feminist Assessment and Reform. In Alison Jaggar (ed.), Gender and Global Justice. Polity. 168-192.
    Every day consumers use and purchase products whose supply chains begin with natural resources in countries plagued by widespread human rights deficits. Many economists and political scientists argue that there is a resource curse: those countries which possess valuable natural resources, especially oil, natural gas, and minerals, are prone to authoritarianism, civil war, and economic mismanagement. The combination of these two empirical facts—that consumers indirectly purchase resources from countries plagued with human rights abuses, and that these abuses are systematically correlated (...)
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  7. Scott Wisor (2012). After the MDGs: Citizen Deliberation and the Post-2015 Development Framework. Ethics and International Affairs 26 (1):113-133.
    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), an unprecedented set of global commitments to reduce various forms of human deprivation and promote human development, are set to expire in 2015. Despite their promise, the MDGs are flawed in a variety of ways. The development community is already discussing what improved development framework should replace the MDGs. I argue that global justice advocates should focus first on the procedure for developing the post-2015 development framework. Specifically, they should create spaces for citizens, especially the (...)
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  8. Scott Wisor (2012). How Should INGOs Allocate Resources? Ethics and Global Politics 5 (1).
    International Non-governmental Organizations (INGOs) face difficult choices when choosing to allocate resources. Given that the resources made available to INGOs fall far short of what is needed to reduce massive human rights deficits, any chosen scheme of resource allocation requires failing to reach other individuals in great need. Facing these moral opportunity costs, what moral reasons should guide INGO resource allocation? Two reasons that clearly matter, and are recognized by philosophers and development practitioners, are the consequences (or benefit or harm (...)
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  9. Scott Wisor (2012). Measuring Global Poverty: Toward a Pro-Poor Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Global poverty measurement is important. It is used to allocate scarce resources, evaluate progress, and assess existing projects, policies, and institutional designs. But given the diversity of ways in which poverty is conceived, how can we settle on a conception and measure that can be used for interpersonal and inter-temporal global comparison? -/- This book lays out the key contemporary debates in poverty measurement, and provides a new analytical framework for thinking about poverty conception and measurement. Rather than trying to (...)
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  10. Scott Wisor (2012). Poverty and Poverty Alleviation. In M. Juergensmeyer & H. K. Anheier (eds.), Encyclopedia of Global Studies. Sage.
    Poverty refers to a core set of basic human deprivations, and poverty alleviation refers to efforts by individuals and institutions to reduce these deprivations. Poverty and poverty alleviation are two of the most important topics in global studies. In a variety of disciplines in global studies, the most important questions include understanding what poverty is, what it is like to be poor, what causes poverty, how poverty can be alleviated, and how poverty is reproduced or reduced by different institutional arrangements.
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  11. Scott Wisor (2012). Property Rights and the Resource Curse: A Reply to Wenar. Journal of Philosophical Research 37:185-204.
    In “Property Rights and the Resource Curse” Leif Wenar argues that the purchase and sale of resources from certain countries constitutes a violation of property rights, and the priority in reforming global trade should be on protecting these property rights. Specifically, Wenar argues that the U.S. and other western liberal democracies should not be complicit in the trade of so-called cursed resources, and the extant legal system can be used to end the trade in cursed resources by prohibiting the importation (...)
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  12. Scott Wisor (2012). The World Development Report 2012: A Review. [REVIEW] Crop Poverty Brief.
    -/- The World Development Report 2012 "Gender Equality and Development" (GED), represents a new push to raise the profile of gender equality among a variety of official development actors. In this new CROP Poverty Brief Scott Wisor situates GED in the broader development context, discusses its key findings and some shortcomings and suggests how it should be used by advocates and allies concerned with eliminating gross gender injustice and global poverty.
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  13. Scott Wisor (2011). Against Shallow Ponds: An Argument Against Singer's Approach to Global Poverty. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (1):19 - 32.
    For 40 years, Peter Singer has deployed the case of the child drowning in the shallow pond to argue for greater donations in foreign aid. The persistent use of the shallow pond example in theorizing about global poverty ignores morally salient features of the real world, and ignoring such morally salient features can have a variety of harmful implications for anti-poverty work. I argue that the shallow pond example should be abandoned, and defend this claim against possible objections.
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  14. Scott Wisor (2009). Is There a Moral Reason To Limit Family Size? Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly 29 (3/4):26-31.
    Although we have an important obligation to protect the environment, people are not morally required to choose to have smaller families for environmental reasons.
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