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  1. Scott Woodcock (forthcoming). Neo-Aristotelian Naturalism and the Indeterminacy Objection. International Journal of Philosophical Studies:1-22.
    Philippa Foot’s virtue ethics remains an intriguing but divisive position in normative ethics. For some, the promise of grounding human virtue in natural facts is a useful method of establishing normative content. For others, the natural facts on which the virtues are established appear naively uninformed when it comes to the empirical details of our species. In response to this criticism, a new cohort of neo-Aristotelians like John Hacker-Wright attempt to defend Foot by reminding critics that the facts at stake (...)
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  2. Scott Woodcock (2014). Comic Immoralism and Relatively Funny Jokes. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (4).
    A widely accepted view in the philosophy of humour is that immoral jokes, like racist, sexist or homophobic jokes, can nevertheless be funny. What remains controversial is whether the moral flaws in these jokes can sometimes increase their humour. Moderate comic immoralism claims that it is possible, in at least some cases, for moral flaws to increase the humour of jokes. Critics of moderate comic immoralism deny that this ever occurs. They recognise that some jokes are both funny and immoral, (...)
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  3. Scott Woodcock (2013). Horror Films and the Argument From Reactive Attitudes. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):309-324.
    Are horror films immoral? Gianluca Di Muzio argues that horror films of a certain kind are immoral because they undermine the reactive attitudes that are responsible for human agents being disposed to respond compassionately to instances of victimization. I begin with this argument as one instance of what I call the Argument from Reactive Attitudes (ARA), and I argue that Di Muzio’s attempt to identify what is morally suspect about horror films must be revised to provide the most persuasive interpretation (...)
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  4. Scott Woodcock (2011). Abortion Counselling and the Informed Consent Dilemma. Bioethics 25 (9):495-504.
    An obstacle to abortion exists in the form of abortion ‘counselling’ that discourages women from terminating their pregnancies. This counselling involves providing information about the procedure that tends to create feelings of guilt, anxiety and strong emotional reactions to the recognizable form of a human fetus. Instances of such counselling that involve false or misleading information are clearly unethical and do not prompt much philosophical reflection, but the prospect of truthful abortion counselling draws attention to a delicate issue for healthcare (...)
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  5. Scott Woodcock (2011). David Baggett , Ed. Tennis and Philosophy: What is the Racket All About? Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 31 (1):1-3.
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  6. Scott Woodcock (2010). Giovanni Boniolo and Gabrielle De Anna, Eds. Evolutionary Ethics and Contemporary Biology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 27 (5):317-320.
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  7. Scott Woodcock (2010). Moral Schizophrenia and the Paradox of Friendship. Utilitas 22 (1):1-25.
    In his landmark paper, , Michael Stocker introduces an affliction that is, according to his diagnosis, endemic to all modern ethical theories. Stocker's paper is well known and often cited, yet moral schizophrenia remains a surprisingly obscure diagnosis. I argue that moral schizophrenia, properly understood, is not necessarily as disruptive as its name suggests. However, I also argue that Stocker's inability to demonstrate that moral schizophrenia constitutes a reductio of modern ethical theories does not rule out the possibility that he (...)
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  8. Scott Woodcock (2009). Disability, Diversity, and the Elimination of Human Kinds. Social Theory and Practice 35 (2):251-278.
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  9. Scott Woodcock (2009). David L. Hull and Michael Ruse, Eds., The Cambridge Companion to The Philosophy of Biology. Philosophy in Review 29 (2):114.
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  10. Scott Woodcock (2009). Five Reasons Why Margaret Somerville is Wrong About Same-Sex Marriage and the Rights of Children. Dialogue 48 (04):867-.
  11. Scott Woodcock (2008). The Social Dimensions of Modesty. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (1):1-29.
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  12. Scott Woodcock (2008). What is Communicative Success? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (1):pp. 85-115.
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  13. Scott Woodcock, Frederick Kroon, Thomas Bittner & Peter Pagin (2008). Vulnerabilities of Morality. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (1):pp. 141-159.
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  14. Scott Woodcock (2006). Philippa Foot's Virtue Ethics has an Achilles' Heel. Dialogue 45 (3):445-468.
    My aim in this article is to argue that Philippa Foot fails to provide a convincing basis for moral evaluation in her book Natural Goodness. Foot’s proposal fails because her conception of natural goodness and defect in human beings either sanctions prescriptive claims that are clearly objectionable or else it inadvertently begs the question of what constitutes a good human life by tacitly appealing to an independent ethical standpoint to sanitize the theory’s normative implications. Foot’s appeal to natural facts about (...)
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  15. Scott Woodcock (2006). The Significance of Non-Vertical Transmission of Phenotype for the Evolution of Altruism. Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):213-234.
    My aim in this paper is to demonstrate that a very simple learning rule based on imitation can help to sustain altruism as a culturally transmitted pattern or behaviour among agents playing a standard prisoner’s dilemma game. The point of this demonstration is not to prove that imitation is single-handedly responsible for existing levels of altruism (a thesis that is false), nor is the point to show that imitation is an important factor in explanations for the evolution of altruism (a (...)
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  16. Scott Woodcock (2005). Pedagogy and People-Seeds. Teaching Philosophy 28 (3):213-235.
    Judith Thomson’s “A Defense of Abortion” is one of the most widely taught papers in undergraduate philosophy, yet it is notoriously difficult to teach. Thomson uses simple terminology and imaginative thought experiments, but her philosophical moves are complex and sometimes difficult to explain to a class still mystified by the prospect of being kidnapped to save a critically ill violinist. My aim here is to identify four sources of difficulty that tend to arise when teaching this paper. In my experience, (...)
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  17. Scott Woodcock (2004). Jonathan Hodge and Gregory Radick, Eds., The Cambridge Companion to Darwin Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (3):199-203.
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  18. Scott Woodcock & Joseph Heath (2002). The Robustness of Altruism as an Evolutionary Strategy. Biology and Philosophy 17 (4):567-590.
    Kin selection, reciprocity and group selection are widely regarded as evolutionary mechanisms capable of sustaining altruism among humans andother cooperative species. Our research indicates, however, that these mechanisms are only particular examples of a broader set of evolutionary possibilities.In this paper we present the results of a series of simple replicator simulations, run on variations of the 2–player prisoner's dilemma, designed to illustrate the wide range of scenarios under which altruism proves to be robust under evolutionary pressures. The set of (...)
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  19. Scott Woodcock (2000). Michael Ruse, Mystery of Mysteries: Is Evolution a Social Construction? Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (3):214-216.
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