Search results for 'Scottish Cinema' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. John Marmysz (2011). Review of Scotland: Global Cinema: Genres, Modes and Identities. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 15 (2):159-165.score: 96.0
    A review of Scotland: Global Cinema, by David Martin-Jones.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Knud Haakonssen (1996). Natural Law and Moral Philosophy: From Grotius to the Scottish Enlightenment. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This major contribution to the history of philosophy provides the most comprehensive guide to modern natural law theory available, sets out the full background to liberal ideas of rights and contractarianism, and offers an extensive study of the Scottish Enlightenment. The time span covered is considerable: from the natural law theories of Grotius and Suarez in the early seventeenth century to the American Revolution and the beginnings of utilitarianism. After a detailed survey of modern natural law theory, the book (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Alexander Broadie, Scottish Philosophy in the 18th Century. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    Philosophy was at the core of the eighteenth century movement known as the Scottish Enlightenment. The movement included major figures, such as Francis Hutcheson, David Hume, Adam Smith, Thomas Reid and Adam Ferguson, and also many others who produced notable works, such as Gershom Carmichael, George Turnbull, George Campbell, James Beattie, Alexander Gerard, Henry Home (Lord Kames) and Dugald Stewart. I discuss some of the leading ideas of these thinkers, though paying less attention than I otherwise would to Hume, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alexander Broadie (2000). Why Scottish Philosophy Matters. Saltire Society.score: 24.0
    CHAPTER Introduction I do not take lightly the title of this book. I believe that Scottish philosophy matters greatly and my principal aim is to say why it ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. James Fieser & James Oswald (eds.) (2000). Scottish Common Sense Philosophy: Sources and Origins. Thoemmes Press.score: 24.0
    The Scottish Common Sense School of philosophy emerged during the Scottish Enlightenment of the second half of the eighteenth century. The School’s principal proponents were Thomas Reid, James Oswald, James Beattie and Dugald Stewart. They believed that we are all naturally implanted with an array of common sense intuitions and these intuitions are in fact the foundation of truth. Their approach dominated philosophical thought in Great Britain and the United States until the mid nineteenth century. In recent years (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Alexander Broadie (1990). The Tradition of Scottish Philosophy: A New Perspective on the Enlightenment. Barnes & Noble.score: 24.0
    Introduction The chief aim of this book is to give an account of two great periods in the history of Scottish culture. One is, inevitably, that of the ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. M. A. Stewart (ed.) (1990). Studies in the Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This collection of new papers on Scottish philosophy in the age of Hutcheson and Hume pays close attention to the study of context and the use of original historical sources as a key to philosophical interpretation. The book includes revolutionary new research on Hume's early reading in science and religion and its impact of his thought.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Alexander Broadie (ed.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment offers a philosophical perspective on an eighteenth-century movement that has been profoundly influential on western culture. A distinguished team of contributors examines the writings of David Hume, Adam Smith, Thomas Reid, Adam Ferguson, Colin Maclaurin and other Scottish thinkers, in fields including philosophy, natural theology, economics, anthropology, natural science and law. In addition, the contributors relate the Scottish Enlightenment to its historical context and assess its impact and legacy in Europe, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Roger L. Emerson (2008). Essays on David Hume, Medical Men, and the Scottish Enlightenment: Industry, Knowledge, and Humanity. Ashgate Pub. Ltd..score: 24.0
    The world in which the Scottish Enlightenment took shape -- Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll (1682-1761) : patronage and the creation of the Scottish Enlightenment -- How many Scots were enlightened? -- What did eighteenth-century Scottish students read? -- Our excellent and never to be forgotten friend : David Hume (26 April 1711- 25 August 1776) -- Hume's intellectual development : part II, 1711-1762 -- Hume's histories -- Hume's economics -- Numbering the medics -- Numbers and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Alberto Brodesco (2013). Corpo nudo, deforme, violato. Un montaggio nelle Histoire(s) du cinéma di Jean-Luc Godard. Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 24 (47).score: 24.0
    L’articolo ragiona intorno al film-saggio Histoire(s) du cinéma (1988-1998) di Jean-Luc Godard e si sofferma in particolare su un controverso montaggio in cui il regista francese accosta estratti da un film pornografico, Freaks di Tod Browning e riprese dai campi di concentramento. In questa sequenza Godard sottopone a una verifica estrema la sua teoria del montaggio, l’idea della riconciliazione, destinata a produrre scintille di pensiero, tra realtà contrapposte. Questa forzatura delle immagini richiama un’analoga forzatura del testimone mostrata in una scena (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Alastair Renton (2006). Seeing the Point of Politics: Exploring the Use of CSAV Techniques as Aids to Understanding the Content of Political Debates in the Scottish Parliament. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 14 (4):277-304.score: 24.0
    Governments now recognise the potential for ICTs to improve the way in which they can engage with the population, whether conducting online consultations to elicit the people’s views on proposed policy, or disseminating information via websites. However, much of the information remains in text format, leaving the task of extracting data the viewer’s responsibility. This can be a daunting prospect, especially in the case of reports of parliamentary proceedings. In the past, Argument Visualisation techniques were used in training law students (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Andrew Ryder (2013). Review Essay: Daniel Morgan, Late Godard and the Possibilities of Cinema. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (2):158-162.score: 24.0
    A review of Daniel Morgan, Late Godard and the Possibilities of Cinema (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2013).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Gerry Coulter (2010). Jean Baudrillard and Cinema: The Problems of Technology, Realism and History. Film-Philosophy 14 (2):6-20.score: 24.0
    Jean Baudrillard loved cinema and was fascinated by the collusions which occur between it and life. He also believed that technologies of virtualization and the pursuit of realism were deeply harmful to the quality of the cinematic image. Precisely at the time when cinema was subject to these forces he pointed out that it is coming to play a far more important role in the collective understanding of history than are the best scholarly histories. Because of the focus (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Júlio Cézar Adam (2012). Da ficção científica para a ficção religiosa: ideias para pensar o cinema de ficção científica como o culto da religião vivida (From Science Fiction to Religious Fiction: ideas to think on Science Fiction cinema as the cult of lived religion). Horizonte 10 (26):552-565.score: 24.0
    Da ficção científica para a ficção religiosa: ideias para pensar o cinema de ficção científica como o culto da religião vivida (From Science Fiction to Religious Fiction: ideas to think on Science Fiction cinema as the cult of lived religion). DOI - 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n26p552 Este artigo tem como objetivo refletir sobre a chamada religião vivida como uma forma de repensar o papel da teologia e das ciências da religião na contemporaneidade. O estudo da religião vivida será investigado na relação (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. David B. Clarke (2009). Dreams Rise in Darkness: The White Magic of Cinema. Film-Philosophy 14 (2):21-40.score: 24.0
    This paper considers Baudrillard’s thought in relation to cinema. It begins with a discussion of the way in which Baudrillard’s work typically invokes film and of the consequent paucity of Baudrillardian studies of cinema, making reference to the literature on Blade Runner and The Matrix . It proceeds to excavate a fuller account of Baudrillard’s conception of cinema, drawing, initially, on Baudrillard’s use of the 1926 German silent film, The Student of Prague , in his conclusion to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Fernando Morais da Costa (2010). Pode o cinema contemporâneo representar o ambiente sonoro em que vivemos? Logos 17 (1):94-106.score: 24.0
    Este texto pretende discutir a possibilidade do cinema representar o ambiente sonoro no qual vive o homem contemporâneo urbano. Tal questionamento parte do entendimento de que o contato cotidiano com os ruídos que nos cercam é matéria-prima fundamental para a produção cinematográfica atual, passando esses sons a ter presenças e funções narrativas cada vez maiores.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Cristiane Gutfreind & Helena Stigger (2013). A resistência armada: Lamarca e Marighella no cinema nacional. Logos 20 (1).score: 24.0
    O presente artigo estuda a ditadura militar no cinema brasileiro, e em especial, analisa a representação de dois líderes da esquerda armada: Carlos Marighella e Carlos Lamarca. O assassinato de Marighella foi evidenciado em filmes como Batismo de sangue (Helvécio Ratton, 2007) e Marighella, retrato falado de um guerrilheiro (Silvio Tendler, 2001). Assim como o caráter humanista de Lamarca foi destacado no filme Lamarca – o capitão da guerrilha (Sérgio Rezende, 1994). Portanto, partindo dessa identificação, buscamos estudar a relação (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. James McCosh (1966). The Scottish Philosophy, Biographical, Expository, Critical, From Hutcheson to Hamilton. Hildesheim, Georg Olms.score: 24.0
    1875. McCosh, Eleventh President of Princeton University, he was a supporter of the Scottish School of Philosophy, and the work of Thomas Reid and Dugald ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jaimie Arona Krems & R. I. M. Dunbar (2013). Clique Size and Network Characteristics in Hyperlink Cinema. Human Nature 24 (4):414-429.score: 24.0
    Hyperlink cinema is an emergent film genre that seeks to push the boundaries of the medium in order to mirror contemporary life in the globalized community. Films in the genre thus create an interacting network across space and time in such a way as to suggest that people’s lives can intersect on scales that would not have been possible without modern technologies of travel and communication. This allows us to test the hypothesis that new kinds of media might permit (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Lance Wahlert (2013). The Burden of Poofs: Criminal Pathology, Clinical Scrutiny, and Homosexual Etiology in Queer Cinema. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):149-175.score: 24.0
    Given the resurgence of scientific studies on the etiology of homosexuality in the wake of the AIDS epidemic, this article considers the effects these studies had on contemporaneous queer filmmakers. By using the subject of criminality as a way to talk about homosexual causality, queer films of the 1990s illustrate that contemporary scientific studies on homosexuality were historically and politically situated in relation to cultural anxieties about other forms of deviance. This article focuses on films that dissect the hetero-normative tendency (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Yadin Dudai (2012). The Cinema-Cognition Dialogue: A Match Made in Brain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    That human evolution amalgamates biological and cultural change is taken as a given, and that the interaction of brain, body and culture is more reciprocal then initially thought becomes apparent as the science of evolution evolves (Jablonka & Lamb 2005). The contribution of science and technology to this process is probably the first to come to mind: the biology of Homo sapiens permits and promotes the development of artificial devices that in turn enable us to sense and reach physical niches (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Andréa França (2010). Cinema Documentário e Espectador em Cena. Logos 17 (1):05-16.score: 24.0
    From the point of view of the spectator, what singularizes the documentary cinema? This essay argues that documentary’s audience defines itself in relation to its capacity to judge. Documentary movies usually demands the public to untie themselves from the immersive condition in order to be put in situ. To address this question, we discuss films that invite the spectator not only judge its scenes, but the daily images of the world.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Tapio Takala Pia Tikka, Aleksander Väljamäe, Aline W. De Borst, Roberto Pugliese, Niklas Ravaja, Mauri Kaipainen (2012). Enactive Cinema Paves Way for Understanding Complex Real-Time Social Interaction in Neuroimaging Experiments. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    We outline general theoretical and practical implications of what we promote as enactive cinema for the neuroscientific study of online socio-emotional interaction. In a real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) setting, participants are immersed in cinematic experiences that simulate social situations. While viewing, their physiological reactions - including brain responses - are tracked, representing implicit and unconscious experiences of the on-going social situations. These reactions, in turn, are analysed in real-time and fed back to modify the cinematic sequences they (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Pia Tikka, Aleksander Väljamäe, Aline W. de Borst, Roberto Pugliese, Niklas Ravaja, Mauri Kaipainen & Tapio Takala (2012). Enactive Cinema Paves Way for Understanding Complex Real-Time Social Interaction in Neuroimaging Experiments. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    We outline general theoretical and practical implications of what we promote as enactive cinema for the neuroscientific study of online socio-emotional interaction. In a real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) setting, participants are immersed in cinematic experiences that simulate social situations. While viewing, their physiological reactions - including brain responses - are tracked, representing implicit and unconscious experiences of the on-going social situations. These reactions, in turn, are analysed in real-time and fed back to modify the cinematic sequences they (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Michael B. Gill (2010). From Cambridge Platonism to Scottish Sentimentalism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):13-31.score: 21.0
    The Cambridge Platonists were a group of religious thinkers who attended and taught at Cambridge from the 1640s until the 1660s. The four most important of them were Benjamin Whichcote, John Smith, Ralph Cudworth, and Henry More. The most prominent sentimentalist moral philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment – Hutcheson, Hume, and Adam Smith – knew of the works of the Cambridge Platonists. But the Scottish sentimentalists typically referred to the Cambridge Platonists only briefly and in passing. The surface (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Craig Smith (2009). The Scottish Enlightenment, Unintended Consequences and the Science of Man. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (1):9-28.score: 21.0
    It is a commonplace that the writers of eighteenth century Scotland played a key role in shaping the early practice of social science. This paper examines how this ‘Scottish’ contribution to the Enlightenment generation of social science was shaped by the fascination with unintended consequences. From Adam Smith's invisible hand to Hume's analysis of convention, through Ferguson's sociology, and Millar's discussion of rank, by way of Robertson's View of Progress, the concept of unintended consequences pervades the writing of the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Nathaniel Wolloch (2006). The Status of Animals in Scottish Enlightenment Philosophy. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 4 (1):63-82.score: 21.0
    Abstract This article examines the consideration of animals by various eighteenth-century Scottish philosophers, with special attention given to the physician and philosopher John Gregory, who utilized the comparison of human beings with animals as a starting point for a discussion about human moral and social improvement. In so doing Gregory, like most of his contemporary fellow Scottish philosophers, exemplified the basic anthropocentrism of the common early modern consideration of animals.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. George Elder Davie (2009). Victor Cousin and the Scottish Philosophers. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (2):193-214.score: 21.0
    Exchanges in the nineteenth century between Sir William Hamilton, James Frederick Ferrier and the French philosopher Victor Cousin are crucial to understanding contemporary efforts to preserve the continuity of the Scottish philosophical tradition on the part of those alive to new themes emanating from Kant and philosophy in Germany. Ferrier's strategy aimed at re-invigorating Descartes and Berkeley by drawing on elements in Adam Smith's social philosophy. But the promising steps taken in this direction in Ferrier's essays on consciousness were (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ryan Patrick Hanley (2009). Social Science and Human Flourishing: The Scottish Enlightenment and Today. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (1):29-46.score: 21.0
    The Scottish Enlightenment is commonly identified as the birthplace of modern social science. But while Scottish and contemporary social science share a commitment to empiricism, contemporary insistence on the separation of empirical analysis from normative judgment invokes a distinction unintelligible to the Scots. In this respect the methods of modern social science seem an attenuation of those of Scottish social science. A similar attenuation can be found in the modern aspiration to judge the outcome of institutions or (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John Marmysz (2002). The Cutting Edge Between Trash Cinema and High Art. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 6 (8).score: 21.0
    A review of Joan Hawkins' Cutting Edge: Art-Horror and the Horrific Avant-gard.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Douglas McDermid (2013). Ferrier and the Myth of Scottish Common Sense Realism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):87-107.score: 21.0
    Once a name to conjure with, Scottish idealist James Frederick Ferrier (1808–1864) is now a largely forgotten figure, notwithstanding the fact that he penned a work of remarkable power and originality: the Institutes of Metaphysic (1854). In ‘Reid and the Philosophy and Common Sense,’ an essay of 1847 which anticipates some of the central themes of the Institutes of Metaphysic, Ferrier presents an excoriating critique of Thomas Reid's brand of common sense realism. Understanding Ferrier's critique of Reid – its (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Toni Vogel Carey (2011). The 'Sub-Rational' in Scottish Moral Science. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (2):225-238.score: 21.0
    Jacob Viner introduced the term ‘sub-rational’ to characterize the faculties – human instinct, sentiment and intuition – that fall between animal instinct and full-blown reason. The Scots considered sympathy both an affective and a physiological link between mind and body, and by natural history, they traced the most foundational societal institutions – language and law, money and property – to a sub-rational origin. Their ‘social evolutionism’ anticipated Darwin's ‘dangerous idea’ that humans differ from the lower animals only in degree, not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Michael J. Demoor (2006). The Philosophy of Art in Reid's Inquiry and Its Place in 18th-Century Scottish Aesthetics. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 4 (1):37-49.score: 21.0
    Abstract It is argued that the scattered remarks on the fine arts made in Reid's Inquiry into the Human Mind (1764) present a conception of the relation between perception and the fine arts that is at once compatible with and different from Reid's mature theory of art in Of Taste (1785). This alternative account of art-relevant perception also points beyond the limits of a philosophy of art developed according to the traditional theory of taste dominant in 18th-century Scottish aesthetic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jehanne-Marie Gavarini (2012). Cristina Johnston (2010) French Minority Cinema. Film-Philosophy 16 (1):287-291.score: 21.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Alexander Broadie (ed.) (1997). The Scottish Enlightenment: An Anthology. Canongate Books.score: 21.0
    In his lengthy introduction, Alexander Broadie emphasizes not only the diversity of intellectual discussion taking place in Scotland, but also the European ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. S. A. Grave (1960/1973). The Scottish Philosophy of Common Sense. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.score: 21.0
  37. Jon Baldwin (2010). Introduction - White Magic: Baudrillard and Cinema. Film-Philosophy 14 (2):1-5.score: 21.0
    An introduction to the special issue on Baudrillard with an overview of the articles included.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. J. H. Burns (2009). Scottish Kantians: An Exploration. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (2):115-131.score: 21.0
    From the late 1790s to the early 1890s, Scottish scholars contributed, as translators, commentators, or critics to the ‘reception’ of Kant's philosophy in Britain. The discussion here considers particularly the work of Richardson, Semple, Gillies, MacVicar, Ferrier, Meiklejohn, and Hastie, and attempts to assess the character, quality, and value of their contributions to Kantian scholarship. An important question throughout is whether – and if so, how far and why – the work of Scottish Kantians can be meaningfully discussed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Giovanni Gellera (2013). The Philosophy of Robert Forbes: A Scottish Scholastic Response to Cartesianism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (2):191-211.score: 21.0
    In the second half of the seventeenth century, philosophy teaching in the Scottish universities gradually moved from scholasticism to Cartesianism. Robert Forbes, regent at Marischal College and King's College, Aberdeen, was a strenuous opponent of Descartes. The analysis of the philosophy of Forbes and of his teacher Patrick Gordon sheds light on the relationship between Scottish Reformed scholasticism and the reception of Descartes in Scotland.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Daniel Sommer Robinson (1961). The Story of Scottish Philosophy. New York, Exposition Press.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jeffrey M. Zacks (2010). The Brain's Cutting-Room Floor: Segmentation of Narrative Cinema. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 21.0
  42. Fabrizio Desideri (2009). Cinema, arte e temporalità nella Montagna incantata. Bioscopia: un capitolo trascurato dell'estetizzazione della politica. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 2 (2).score: 21.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Kevin L. Ferguson (2010). The Cinema of Control: On Diabetic Excess and Illness in Film. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (3):183-204.score: 21.0
    While not rare, films that represent diabetes must work around the disease’s banal invisibility, and images of diabetics in film are especially susceptible to metaphor and exaggeration. This essay is the first to outline a diabetic filmography, discussing medical and cinematic strategies for visualizing the disease as well as how the illness informs family plots and heroic characters in horror films. Doing so, it participates in a larger discussion of the manner in which film images of ill or disabled groups (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Hunter Vaughan (2010). The Paradox of Film: An Industry of Sex, a Form of Seduction (Notes on Jean Baudrillard's Seduction and the Cinema). Film-Philosophy 14 (2):41-61.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Matthias Vollet (2011). Images – perception and cinema in Bergson and Deleuze. [Spanish]. Eidos 5:70-93.score: 21.0
    Deleuze explica el cine a partir de dos nociones claves: imagen-movimiento e imagen-tiempo. Con las dos, quiere a grosso modo explicar el cine hasta la Segunda Guerra Mundial como un cine que se concentra en acción y movimiento, a diferencia del cine de Posguerra, que se ha vuelto reflexivo y pivilegia la presencia del tiempo. Deleuze afirma que ha tomado ambos conceptos de Bergson, y especialmente de su obra Materia y memoria. Este artículo explicará brevemente algunos rasgos fundamentales de estas (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. George Elder Davie (1991). Scottish Enlightenment and Other Essays. Polygon.score: 21.0
  47. George Elder Davie (1973). The Social Significance of the Scottish Philosophy of Common Sense. [University of Dundee].score: 21.0
  48. John Alfred Dwyer (1998). The Age of the Passions: An Interpretation of Adam Smith and Scottish Enlightenment Culture. Tuckwell Press.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Rebecca Garden & Hyon Joo Yoo Murphree (2007). Class and Ethnicity in the Global Market for Organs: The Case of Korean Cinema. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (4):213-229.score: 21.0
    While organ transplantation has been established in the medical imagination since the 1960s, this technology is currently undergoing a popular re-imagination in the era of global capitalism. As transplantation procedures have become routine in medical centers in non-Western and developing nations and as organ sales and transplant tourism become increasingly common, organs that function as a material resource increasingly derive from subaltern bodies. This essay explores this development as represented in Korean filmmaker Park Chan-wook’s 2002 Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, focusing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Laécio Almeida Gomes (2011). A filosofia eo cinema catástrofe:“O Dia depois de Amanhã” na relação Homem x Natureza. Cadernos Do Pet Filosofia 1 (2):p - 50.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000